History Literature / ThePrince

2nd Jan '18 2:37:07 PM DarkPaladinX
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2nd Jan '18 2:31:04 PM DarkPaladinX
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* WithUsOrAgainstUs: This is trope, along with NeutralityBacklash, is one of the reasons why the prince should avoid a "neutral" position. In times to conflicts between warring states, the Prince should at least form an alliance with a faction to gain trust from themm and even if the prince loses, the prince at least lose together with an ally.

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* WithUsOrAgainstUs: This is trope, along with NeutralityBacklash, is one of the reasons why the prince should avoid a "neutral" position. In times to conflicts between warring states, the Prince should at least form an alliance with a faction to gain trust from themm them and even if the prince loses, the prince at least lose together with an ally.
2nd Jan '18 2:30:06 PM DarkPaladinX
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* WithUsOrAgainstUs: This is trope, along with NeutralityBackfire, is one of the reasons why the prince should avoid a "neutral" position. In times to conflicts between warring states, the Prince should at least form an alliance with a faction to gain trust from them.

to:

* WithUsOrAgainstUs: This is trope, along with NeutralityBackfire, NeutralityBacklash, is one of the reasons why the prince should avoid a "neutral" position. In times to conflicts between warring states, the Prince should at least form an alliance with a faction to gain trust from them.themm and even if the prince loses, the prince at least lose together with an ally.
2nd Jan '18 2:29:04 PM DarkPaladinX
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Added DiffLines:

* ThePowerOfHate: The book advises the prince that if the prince should rule his kingdom through fear, the prince should avoid this trope, as ruling the kingdom with hatred will give your subjects enough justification of overthrowing the prince.


Added DiffLines:

* WithUsOrAgainstUs: This is trope, along with NeutralityBackfire, is one of the reasons why the prince should avoid a "neutral" position. In times to conflicts between warring states, the Prince should at least form an alliance with a faction to gain trust from them.
29th Nov '17 11:50:28 AM ImperialMajestyXO
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* TheDreaded: The book famously claims that a ruler is safer in his position feared than loved, if he cannot be both. Being an object of fear, therefore, is a good way of preserving power. However, a ruler must nevertheless ensure that he is not hated, because hatred can overcome fear.



%%* JerkJustifications

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%%* JerkJustifications* JerkJustifications: Machiavelli justifies the sometimes brutal measures he advocates by claiming that rulers have to be ruthless in order to maintain their power. That being said, however, he states that a ruler should be a pragmatist willing to cross lines if doing so would be in his own interest, rather than a puppy-kicking psycho who commits atrocities because he enjoys it.
16th Sep '17 4:00:07 PM nombretomado
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Written by Italian statesman Creator/NiccoloMachiavelli in 1513, ''The Prince'' (''Il Principe'') is the single most famous political treatise and the first entirely secular work of TheRenaissance. At the time it was first published, ''The Prince'' was seen as extremely scandalous for its endorsement of ruthlessness and amorality. Nevertheless, it quickly became popular with politicians and remains highly influential in Western politics today. If there's any MagnificentBastard in ''anything'' set after the Renaissance, it's very probable he's taken cues from this book.[[note]]Although they aren't quite as likely to actually have an in depth knowledge of the book as much as a pop-culture impression.[[/note]]

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Written by Italian statesman Creator/NiccoloMachiavelli in 1513, ''The Prince'' (''Il Principe'') is the single most famous political treatise and the first entirely secular work of TheRenaissance.UsefulNotes/TheRenaissance. At the time it was first published, ''The Prince'' was seen as extremely scandalous for its endorsement of ruthlessness and amorality. Nevertheless, it quickly became popular with politicians and remains highly influential in Western politics today. If there's any MagnificentBastard in ''anything'' set after the Renaissance, it's very probable he's taken cues from this book.[[note]]Although they aren't quite as likely to actually have an in depth knowledge of the book as much as a pop-culture impression.[[/note]]
26th Feb '17 3:33:06 PM TheBigBopper
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* HundredPercentAdorationRating: The safest position to be in.
* AboveGoodAndEvil: [[BeamMeUpScotty "The ends justify the means"]], after all.
** Subverted. The actual lesson is that one must be willing to ShootTheDog if the situation calls upon it as the leader.

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* HundredPercentAdorationRating: The safest position Machiavelli says that being universally loved would be ideal for a ruler, but it isn't a very realistic goal because of limited resources and human nature. You should earn a reputation for being strict but fair instead of bankrupting yourself in vain by trying to be in.
please everybody.
* AboveGoodAndEvil: The common misreading of the message is that [[BeamMeUpScotty "The ends justify the means"]], after all.
** Subverted. The actual
means"]]. In reality, the lesson is that one must be willing to ShootTheDog if the situation calls upon it as the leader.



* BadBoss: Machiavelli advises you to use both this trope and BenevolentBoss. You should be harsh enough to keep your subordinates in order and fear, but you also must be benevolent to them, so they will love you. In short, Machiavelli advices you to be a ''pragmatic'' boss.

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* BadBoss: Machiavelli advises you to use both this trope and BenevolentBoss. You should be harsh enough to keep your subordinates in order and fear, but you also must be benevolent enough to them, so them that they will love be loyal to you. In short, Machiavelli advices you to be a ''pragmatic'' boss.
3rd Feb '17 6:43:03 AM Anarquistador
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Added DiffLines:

* DoWrongRight: Sooner or later, you're going to be in a position where you're going to have to do something awful. That's not a criticism; that's just a reality of politics. Machiavelli offers advice on how to do this awful thing with the least amount of collateral damage.
28th Dec '16 12:15:18 PM EDP
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* WeAreStrugglingTogether: The last few chapters of the book blame many of Italy's woes on this trope. He concludes by asking the Medicis to seize Italy and conquer it with Italian armies, thereby averting the problems that had cropped up with using mercenaries. His pleas would eventually be answered... 350 years later by Giuseppe Garibaldi.

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* WeAreStrugglingTogether: The last few chapters of the book blame many of Italy's woes on this trope. He concludes by asking the Medicis to seize Italy and conquer it with Italian armies, thereby averting the problems that had cropped up with using mercenaries. His pleas would eventually be answered... 350 years later by Giuseppe Garibaldi.the House of Savoy.
28th Oct '16 12:43:30 AM Eagal
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* GondorCallsForAid: If your friends/allies are in trouble, the first thing you shall do is to help them, not to stand outside and declare "neutral". It just makes you look weak in the eyes of the enemy, and unreliable in the eyes of your allies.



** The chapters on war might as well be called "Why one should never use mercenaries parts I, II, and III."



* ThePowerOfFriendship[=/=]AFriendInNeed[=/=]GondorCallsForAid: If your friends/allies are in trouble, the first thing you shall do is to help them, not to stand outside and declare "neutral". It just makes you look weak in the eyes of the enemy, and unreliable in the eyes of your allies.



* TheUnfettered

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* %%* TheUnfettered
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