History Literature / ThePictureOfDorianGray

8th Dec '17 10:17:45 PM Bartron
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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: In the novel, Dorian stabs the painting for entirely selfish reasons- he hates looking at it, and its continued existence represents the last dregs of a conscience he wishes to be entirely rid of (and there is a chance it could link him to the murder of Basil Howard). In the 1945 movie, his reasons are exactly the opposite- he considers it responsible for leading his life astray, and sees its destruction as a necessary step toward reforming himself into a better man.

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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: In the novel, Dorian stabs the painting for entirely selfish reasons- he hates looking at it, and its continued existence represents the last dregs of a conscience he wishes to be entirely rid of (and there is a chance it could link him to the murder of Basil Howard).Hallward). In the 1945 movie, his reasons are exactly the opposite- he considers it responsible for leading his life astray, and sees its destruction as a necessary step toward reforming himself into a better man.
8th Dec '17 10:16:09 PM Bartron
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Added DiffLines:

*AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: In the novel, Dorian stabs the painting for entirely selfish reasons- he hates looking at it, and its continued existence represents the last dregs of a conscience he wishes to be entirely rid of (and there is a chance it could link him to the murder of Basil Howard). In the 1945 movie, his reasons are exactly the opposite- he considers it responsible for leading his life astray, and sees its destruction as a necessary step toward reforming himself into a better man.
2nd Nov '17 7:03:49 PM WillBGood
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* GoodScarsEvilScars: Dorian's lash marks and picture distortion.

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* GoodScarsEvilScars: (2009 film) Dorian's lash marks and picture distortion.



* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: Lord Henry says "God forgive me" after he sees the portrait and the decayed body of Dorian and figures out what happened.

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* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: (2009 film) Lord Henry says "God forgive me" after he sees the portrait and the decayed body of Dorian and figures out what happened.
18th Oct '17 2:39:14 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* EveryoneHasStandards: Dorian's grandfather, Lord Kelso hired an adventurer to challenge his commoner son-in-law to a duel so he could be killed. While the gentry couldn't understand why Dorian's mother chose somebody below her station, even they were appalled by Kelso's cruelty. According to Harry's uncle "he ate his chop alone in the club for sometime".

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* EveryoneHasStandards: Dorian's grandfather, Lord Kelso Kelso, hired an adventurer to challenge his commoner son-in-law to a duel so he could be killed. While the gentry couldn't understand why Dorian's mother chose somebody below her station, even they were appalled by Kelso's cruelty. According to Harry's uncle "he uncle, "He ate his chop alone in the club for sometime".some time".



* EvilMakesYouUgly: Evil would make Dorian ugly if not for the picture taking the ugliness upon itself.
** This is also a running theme through the book, in accordance to Victorian society believing in this trope. The idea that evil inevitably shows itself in one's features, and that the lower classes are inherently evil because of their ugliness.
* FaceOfAnAngelMindOfADemon: Dorian. As usual, the youngness displays his innocence, while he can still perform murder and related.

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* EvilMakesYouUgly: A major theme in the series, in accordance with Victorian society believing this trope. Evil would make Dorian ugly if not for the picture taking the ugliness upon itself.
** This is also a running theme through the book, in accordance to Victorian society believing in this trope. The idea that evil inevitably shows itself in one's features, and that the lower classes are inherently evil because of their ugliness.
itself.
* FaceOfAnAngelMindOfADemon: Dorian. As usual, the youngness displays Dorian, due to his innocence, while he can still perform murder and related. immunity to EvilMakesYouUgly.



* FreudianTrio: A dark twist on one (the author even admitted that all three are [[AuthorAvatar reflections of himself]]). Henry may be advocating giving in to your Id, but he does so on coldly logical grounds, making him something of an {{Ubermensch}} Superego ([[BilingualBonus har har]]); Basil is the most balanced of the three, but is ignored by the protagonist, Dorian, who plays the unfettered Id.

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* FreudianTrio: A dark twist on one (the author even admitted that all three are [[AuthorAvatar reflections of himself]]). Henry may be advocating giving in to your Id, but he does so on coldly logical grounds, making him something of an {{Ubermensch}} Superego ([[BilingualBonus har har]]); Superego; Basil is the most balanced of the three, but is ignored by the protagonist, Dorian, who plays the unfettered Id.



* ImmortalityInducer: Commonly believed to be the case, but never stated. Dorian does not show signs of aging, but we don't know if he's actually immortal.



* SpookyPainting: The decayed Dorian is mighty unpleasant to look at.
** Fun fact: The version of the painting at the top of the page was done by Ivan Albright, who ''specializes'' in these.

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* SpookyPainting: The decayed Dorian is mighty unpleasant to look at.
**
at. Fun fact: The version of the painting at the top of the page was done by Ivan Albright, who ''specializes'' in these.



* AdaptationDyeJob: In the original novel, Dorian was blond. In every modern adaptation (the 1970 one with Helmut Berger is a notable exception, as is also the 1973 MadeForTVMovie with Shane Briant), he's portrayed with black hair. It has a lot to do with the way beauty standards have changed over time.

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* AdaptationalBadass: In some adaptations, Dorian'a invincible looks come with a HealingFactor that makes him virtually immune to physical damage.
* AdaptationDyeJob: In the original novel, Dorian was blond. In every most modern adaptation (the 1970 one with Helmut Berger is a notable exception, as is also the 1973 MadeForTVMovie with Shane Briant), adaptation, he's portrayed with black hair. It has a lot to do with the way beauty standards have changed over time.



* CelebrityParadox: In the 1945 film Dorian reads a poem by--Oscar Wilde.

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* CelebrityParadox: In the 1945 film Dorian reads a poem by--Oscar by Oscar Wilde.



* ImmortalityInducer: Some adaptations make Dorian immortal, possibly due to the common interpretation that Dorian is immortal in the original story. Dorian does not show signs of aging, the text never overtly states that he's actually immortal.



* SettingUpdate: The 1970 film version updates the setting to then-contemporary times. The more open attitudes about homosexuality and premarital sex shift the plot around a little, but it still works.

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* SettingUpdate: SettingUpdate:
**
The 1970 film version updates the setting to then-contemporary times. The more open attitudes about homosexuality and premarital sex shift the plot around a little, but it still works.
16th Oct '17 7:47:32 PM ProfessorGrimm
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Wilde's novel has been adapted for film, television, and stage at least two dozen times. One of the most famous adaptations is a 1945 film directed by Albert Lewin that starred Creator/GeorgeSanders as Lord Henry, Hurd Hatfield as Dorian, Donna Reed as Basil's niece Gladys (a wholly different character in the film), and 20-year-old Creator/AngelaLansbury as Sibyl Vane.

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Wilde's novel has been adapted for film, television, and stage at least two dozen times. One of the most famous adaptations is a 1945 film directed by Albert Lewin that starred Creator/GeorgeSanders as Lord Henry, Hurd Hatfield as Dorian, Donna Reed as Basil's niece Gladys (a wholly different character in the film), and 20-year-old Creator/AngelaLansbury as Sibyl Vane.
Vane. Tropes for that film should go [[Film/ThePictureOfDorianGray1945 here]].
15th Oct '17 12:24:11 PM ProfessorGrimm
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* EveryoneHasStandards: Dorian's grandfather, Lord Kelso hired an adventurer to challenge his commoner son-in-law to a duel so he could be killed. While the gentry couldn't understand why Dorian's mother chose somebody below he station, even they were appalled by Kelso's cruelty. According to Harry's uncle "he ate his chop alone in the club for sometime".

to:

* EveryoneHasStandards: Dorian's grandfather, Lord Kelso hired an adventurer to challenge his commoner son-in-law to a duel so he could be killed. While the gentry couldn't understand why Dorian's mother chose somebody below he her station, even they were appalled by Kelso's cruelty. According to Harry's uncle "he ate his chop alone in the club for sometime".
15th Oct '17 12:20:33 PM ProfessorGrimm
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* ZeroApprovalRating:

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* ZeroApprovalRating:ZeroPercentApprovalRating:
15th Oct '17 12:19:17 PM ProfessorGrimm
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* ZeroApprovalRating:
** Dorian's grandfather Lord Kelso was by all accounts a nasty old goat; even his fellow aristocrats despised him.
** Dorian is an interesting case; his reputation is infamous, plenty of people hate him, yet he's still able to move around in the best circles.


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* LineageComesFromTheFather: The reason why Dorian despite being a wealthy gentleman and having a lord for a grandfather has no title; his aristocratic mother married a common soldier, and since women couldn't inherit titles, Dorian is but a mere gentleman; luckily his mother was independently wealthy.
15th Oct '17 8:19:26 AM ProfessorGrimm
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* AristocratsAreEvil: Henry has a corrupting philosophy, though he never actually acts on it himself. Dorian becomes corrupted by his condition, and his wealth and status give him virtually free reign to indulge all of his vices.

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* AristocratsAreEvil: AristocratsAreEvil:
**
Henry has a corrupting philosophy, though he never actually acts on it himself. Dorian becomes corrupted by his condition, and his wealth and status give him virtually free reign to indulge all of his vices.
** A straighter example would be Dorian's grandfather Lord Kelso who hired an adventurer to kill his commoner son-in-law.


Added DiffLines:

* EveryoneHasStandards: Dorian's grandfather, Lord Kelso hired an adventurer to challenge his commoner son-in-law to a duel so he could be killed. While the gentry couldn't understand why Dorian's mother chose somebody below he station, even they were appalled by Kelso's cruelty. According to Harry's uncle "he ate his chop alone in the club for sometime".


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* FreudianExcuse: Dorian had a really horrible childhood: his aristocratic mother married a soldier below her social station. Her father hired an adventurer to kill her husband under the pretext of a duel. She then died of a broken heart and Dorian was left with under the care of his cruel and uncaring grandfather.
13th Sep '17 9:00:33 PM NOYB
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* TallDarkAndHandsome: Dorian often becomes this in adaptations instead of blonde haired as he was in the novel, partly because of changing beauty standards.

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* TallDarkAndHandsome: Dorian often becomes this in adaptations instead of blonde blond haired as he was in the novel, partly because of changing beauty standards.
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