History Literature / TheOnesWhoWalkAwayFromOmelas

15th Oct '16 7:48:36 PM Fireblood
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%% * {{Powered By A Forsaken Child}}]].

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%% * {{Powered By A Forsaken Child}}]].PoweredByAForsakenChild: The good of Omelas appears to rely on the abject suffering of one child.



* TakeThatAudience: The LemonyNarrator makes it clear that they are aware the reader can't possibly accept a utopia without some sort of catch, so it brings up the [[spoiler: tortured child]] with a "are you happy now?" demeanor.

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* TakeThatAudience: The LemonyNarrator makes it clear that they are aware the reader can't possibly accept a utopia without some sort of catch, so it brings up the [[spoiler: tortured child]] with a an "are you happy now?" demeanor.
3rd Sep '16 4:26:13 PM CrypticMirror
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* [[spoiler: FateWorseThanDeath: Being chosen to be the one child on whose suffering the city is founded.]]

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* [[spoiler: FateWorseThanDeath: Being [[spoiler:Being chosen to be the one child on whose suffering the city is founded.]]



* [[spoiler:{{Powered By A Forsaken Child}}]].

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%% * [[spoiler:{{Powered {{Powered By A Forsaken Child}}]].
21st Aug '16 11:09:51 PM Terran117
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* {{Deconstruction}}: More like a deconstruction of utopia deconstructions. As readers who are used to reading dystopian literature can't possibly accept a utopia with some sort of catch, the LemonyNarrator just throws out [[spoiler: the tortured child]] to satisfy the reader's inner curiosity.


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* PostModernism: The LemonyNarrator interacts with the reader a lot and there is no conventional story. Actually, this may be a case of "post-post modernism" as well since the story deconstructs the reader's desire to know what the catch of a utopia is (thereby revealing the society to be a dystopia) which has come about in post modern dystopian stories that critique the idea of a perfect society.


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* TakeThatAudience: The LemonyNarrator makes it clear that they are aware the reader can't possibly accept a utopia without some sort of catch, so it brings up the [[spoiler: tortured child]] with a "are you happy now?" demeanor.
19th Jul '16 2:52:57 PM morenohijazo
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* DefectorFromParadise: The story features the titular Ones. The Ones are people who choose to leave the perfect Utopian city of Omelas of their own will because [[spoiler: Omelas' prosperity is PoweredByAForsakenChild]].
24th Jun '16 7:36:22 PM TotemicHero
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''[[http://web.archive.org/web/20070810183849/http://www.twinoaks.org/members-exmembers/exmembers/center/omelas.html The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas]]'' is a {{Meta Fiction}} by {{Ursula K Le Guin}}, written in 1973.

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''[[http://web."[[http://web.archive.org/web/20070810183849/http://www.twinoaks.org/members-exmembers/exmembers/center/omelas.html The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas]]'' Omelas]]" is a {{Meta Fiction}} by {{Ursula K Le Guin}}, written in 1973.



!!''The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas'' contains examples of:

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!!''The !!"The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas'' Omelas" contains examples of:
31st Dec '15 3:28:35 AM CassandraLeo
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* WalkingSpoiler: [[spoiler:It's basically impossible to discuss the major themes of the work without mentioning the forsaken child.]]
20th May '15 12:05:47 PM marcoasalazarm
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* MarySueTopia: PlayedWith: the LemonyNarrator constantly mentions how perfect the town is, but obviously doesn't expects the reader to believe that such a place would exist ''anywhere'' without some kind of price being paid, so eventually the narrator [[spoiler: just drops the description of the child and what is done to it for the sake of making ''the rest'' of the town a MarySueTopia and essentially asks the reader: "There you go, a horrible flaw in the system! Are you happy now?!"]].

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* MarySueTopia: PlayedWith: the LemonyNarrator constantly mentions how perfect the town is, but obviously [[GenreSavvy doesn't expects the reader to believe believe]] that such a place would exist ''anywhere'' [[TownWithADarkSecret without some kind of price being paid, paid]], so eventually the narrator [[spoiler: just drops the description of the child and what is done to it for the sake of making ''the rest'' of the town a MarySueTopia and essentially asks the reader: "There "[[ArmorPiercingQuestion There you go, a horrible flaw in the system! Are you happy now?!"]].now?!]]"]].
20th May '15 12:03:01 PM marcoasalazarm
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* MarySueTopia: PlayedWith: the LemonyNarrator constantly mentions how perfect the town is, but obviously doesn't expects the reader to believe that such a place would exist ''anywhere'' without some kind of price being paid, so eventually the narrator [[spoiler: just drops the description of the child and what is done to it for the sake of making ''the rest'' of the town a MarySueTopia and essentially asks the reader: "There you go, a horrible flaw in the system! Are you happy now?!"]].
29th Apr '15 1:09:20 PM xanthocholy
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* ItIsDehumanizing: An IntendedAudienceReaction. The narrator refers to the child as "it" because "it could be a boy or girl" at any time in the history of Omelas, but the effect of this trope persists nonetheless: readers understand that the child is seen more as a thing than as a person.
17th Dec '14 7:19:12 PM vifetoile
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* MeaningfulName: Averted. Le Guin says that she just got the name by seeing "Salem, OR" (that's Oregon) on a road sign and spelled it backwards on a whim. But the name "Salem" is meaningful on its own -- it has the same root word as the Hebrew word ''Shalom,'' or "peace," and of course it is the name of the town which held infamous witch trials.
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