History Literature / TheOldManAndTheSea

11th Dec '17 8:38:13 PM DustSnitch
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* BadassGrandpa: And how. Santiago, naturally, being a Hemingway protagonist.



* RealLifeWritesThePlot: Of a sort. Santiago for the most part is the standard Hemingway protagonist, i.e. [[TheAce a competent]], [[DuelToTheDeath utterly determined]] [[BadassNormal paragon of manliness]]. But he's also an [[BadassGrandpa old man]]. Hemingway was starting to age around the time he wrote Old Man, and it came right after he wrote ''Across the River and into the Trees''[[labelnote:*]] Which Hemingway [[MagnumOpusDissonance actually considered]] his masterpiece[[/labelnote]], a book which got significant bad press. In a way, Santiago is probably something of a reflection upon the way Hemingway felt about himself.

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* RealLifeWritesThePlot: Of a sort. Santiago for the most part is the standard Hemingway protagonist, i.e. [[TheAce a competent]], [[DuelToTheDeath utterly determined]] [[BadassNormal paragon of manliness]]. But he's also an [[BadassGrandpa old man]].man. Hemingway was starting to age around the time he wrote Old Man, and it came right after he wrote ''Across the River and into the Trees''[[labelnote:*]] Which Hemingway [[MagnumOpusDissonance actually considered]] his masterpiece[[/labelnote]], a book which got significant bad press. In a way, Santiago is probably something of a reflection upon the way Hemingway felt about himself.
16th Oct '17 8:19:17 PM marcoasalazarm
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Added DiffLines:

* DoomedMoralVictor: Santiago wins his fight against the marlin, and in doing so he has made an unforgettable act of fishing, but the effects of being stranded at sea for ''days'' exposed to the elements, with very little food, water and sleep, and having exhausted himself beyond belief with all of the constant struggling, he's so exhausted that the feverish dreaming he's having at the end may or may not be his DyingDream.
23rd Jun '17 5:28:54 PM DustSnitch
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-->''Man is not made for defeat. A man can be destroyed but not defeated.''

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-->''Man ->''Man is not made for defeat. A man can be destroyed but not defeated.''
23rd Jun '17 5:28:39 PM DustSnitch
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* CrucifiedHeroShot

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* CrucifiedHeroShotCrucifiedHeroShot: Santiago has a nail driven into his hand, which is described in a way that it could just as easily be talking about UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} during his Crucifixion.



* WorthyOpponent: The marlin.
** The first shark might count too.

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* %%* WorthyOpponent: The marlin.
** %%** The first shark might count too.
6th Jun '17 7:36:35 PM PaulA
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Added DiffLines:

* BrokenAce: The last book Hemingway ever saw published himself was also fittingly his last [[BittersweetEnding bittersweet]] reconstruction of his philosophy of manhood. Santiago catches the fish, but it [[SenselessSacrifice gets eaten by sharks]] and [[spoiler: [[MentorOccupationalHazard it's implied he dies at the end]]]]. Nevertheless, he still passes his lessons on to the boy, and most importantly, [[DoomedMoralVictor the fish never beat him]]. His DoomedMoralVictor status is even cemented by a literary CrucifiedHeroShot.
24th Jan '17 11:55:44 AM Black_Diesel
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Added DiffLines:

[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/13269111_1_l.jpg]]
1st Dec '16 6:00:53 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* [[ThreateningShark Everything Is Even Worse With Sharks]]


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* ThreateningShark: Many of these end up devouring the Marlin after Santiago finally catches it, leaving only the head and the skeleton.
9th Oct '16 12:16:01 AM DustSnitch
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%%Don't pothole Badass to this article. I swear to God, I have 15,000 more links to go through, don't make me come back here for Old Man and the Sea.



** The marlin as well. That's one {{badass}} fish to drag the old man that far out to sea.

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** The marlin as well. That's one {{badass}} badass fish to drag the old man that far out to sea.
28th Sep '16 6:33:29 PM jamespolk
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Due to the symbolism, relatively easy prose and short length, ''The Old Man and the Sea'' is a mainstay of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanEducationalSystem high school English courses]], and is perhaps one of the most widely-read books in the United States (at least for people under thirty). It won the Pulitzer Prize in 1953 and pretty much sealed the deal on Hemingway's 1954 UsefulNotes/NobelPrizeInLiterature. It was adapted into a 1958 film with Creator/SpencerTracy and into a 1990 miniseries with Creator/AnthonyQuinn.

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Due to the symbolism, relatively easy prose and short length, ''The Old Man and the Sea'' is a mainstay of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanEducationalSystem high school English courses]], and is perhaps one of the most widely-read books in the United States (at least for people under thirty). It won the Pulitzer Prize in 1953 and pretty much sealed the deal on Hemingway's 1954 UsefulNotes/NobelPrizeInLiterature. It was adapted into a 1958 film with Creator/SpencerTracy Creator/SpencerTracy, an UsefulNotes/AcademyAward-winning 1999 Russian cartoon, and into a 1990 miniseries with Creator/AnthonyQuinn.
8th May '16 11:18:45 AM Quanyails
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* {{Beige Prose}}: This book basically defines this trope.

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* {{Beige Prose}}: %%* BeigeProse: This book basically defines this trope.



* RealLifeWritesThePlot: Of a sort. Santiago for the most part is the standard Hemingway protagonist, i.e. [[TheAce a competent]], [[DuelToTheDeath utterly determined]] [[BadassNormal paragon of manliness]]. But he's also an [[BadassGrandpa old man]]. Hemingway was starting to age around the time he wrote Old Man, and it came right after he wrote Across the River and into the Trees[[labelnote:*]] Which Hemingway [[MagnumOpusDissonance actually considered]] his masterpiece[[/labelnote]], a book which got significant bad press. In a way, Santiago is probably something of a reflection upon the way Hemingway felt about himself.

to:

* RealLifeWritesThePlot: Of a sort. Santiago for the most part is the standard Hemingway protagonist, i.e. [[TheAce a competent]], [[DuelToTheDeath utterly determined]] [[BadassNormal paragon of manliness]]. But he's also an [[BadassGrandpa old man]]. Hemingway was starting to age around the time he wrote Old Man, and it came right after he wrote Across ''Across the River and into the Trees[[labelnote:*]] Trees''[[labelnote:*]] Which Hemingway [[MagnumOpusDissonance actually considered]] his masterpiece[[/labelnote]], a book which got significant bad press. In a way, Santiago is probably something of a reflection upon the way Hemingway felt about himself.
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