History Literature / TheOldManAndTheSea

24th Jan '17 11:55:44 AM Black_Diesel
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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/13269111_1_l.jpg]]
1st Dec '16 6:00:53 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* [[ThreateningShark Everything Is Even Worse With Sharks]]


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* ThreateningShark: Many of these end up devouring the Marlin after Santiago finally catches it, leaving only the head and the skeleton.
9th Oct '16 12:16:01 AM DustSnitch
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%%Don't pothole Badass to this article. I swear to God, I have 15,000 more links to go through, don't make me come back here for Old Man and the Sea.



** The marlin as well. That's one {{badass}} fish to drag the old man that far out to sea.

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** The marlin as well. That's one {{badass}} badass fish to drag the old man that far out to sea.
28th Sep '16 6:33:29 PM jamespolk
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Due to the symbolism, relatively easy prose and short length, ''The Old Man and the Sea'' is a mainstay of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanEducationalSystem high school English courses]], and is perhaps one of the most widely-read books in the United States (at least for people under thirty). It won the Pulitzer Prize in 1953 and pretty much sealed the deal on Hemingway's 1954 UsefulNotes/NobelPrizeInLiterature. It was adapted into a 1958 film with Creator/SpencerTracy and into a 1990 miniseries with Creator/AnthonyQuinn.

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Due to the symbolism, relatively easy prose and short length, ''The Old Man and the Sea'' is a mainstay of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanEducationalSystem high school English courses]], and is perhaps one of the most widely-read books in the United States (at least for people under thirty). It won the Pulitzer Prize in 1953 and pretty much sealed the deal on Hemingway's 1954 UsefulNotes/NobelPrizeInLiterature. It was adapted into a 1958 film with Creator/SpencerTracy Creator/SpencerTracy, an UsefulNotes/AcademyAward-winning 1999 Russian cartoon, and into a 1990 miniseries with Creator/AnthonyQuinn.
8th May '16 11:18:45 AM Quanyails
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* {{Beige Prose}}: This book basically defines this trope.

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* {{Beige Prose}}: %%* BeigeProse: This book basically defines this trope.



* RealLifeWritesThePlot: Of a sort. Santiago for the most part is the standard Hemingway protagonist, i.e. [[TheAce a competent]], [[DuelToTheDeath utterly determined]] [[BadassNormal paragon of manliness]]. But he's also an [[BadassGrandpa old man]]. Hemingway was starting to age around the time he wrote Old Man, and it came right after he wrote Across the River and into the Trees[[labelnote:*]] Which Hemingway [[MagnumOpusDissonance actually considered]] his masterpiece[[/labelnote]], a book which got significant bad press. In a way, Santiago is probably something of a reflection upon the way Hemingway felt about himself.

to:

* RealLifeWritesThePlot: Of a sort. Santiago for the most part is the standard Hemingway protagonist, i.e. [[TheAce a competent]], [[DuelToTheDeath utterly determined]] [[BadassNormal paragon of manliness]]. But he's also an [[BadassGrandpa old man]]. Hemingway was starting to age around the time he wrote Old Man, and it came right after he wrote Across ''Across the River and into the Trees[[labelnote:*]] Trees''[[labelnote:*]] Which Hemingway [[MagnumOpusDissonance actually considered]] his masterpiece[[/labelnote]], a book which got significant bad press. In a way, Santiago is probably something of a reflection upon the way Hemingway felt about himself.
26th Mar '16 9:44:18 PM Jaro7788
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* {{Narm}}: The Polish title of the novella, ''Stary człowiek i morze'', while being a perfectly faithful rendition of the original, has the dubious distinction of being one of the most chuckle-inspiring titles in the history of Polish translations due to the fact that the pronunciation of the "sea"-meaning word ''morze'' and ''może'', the latter of which literally means "he/she/it can", sounds about the same. And when the verb ''może" is left without a complimentary, it is commonly associated with sexual prowess. So the whole title, when read aloud, might just as well say "An old man who can still get some".
26th Mar '16 9:43:55 PM Jaro7788
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* Narm: The Polish title of the novella, ''Stary człowiek i morze'', while being a perfectly faithful rendition of the original, has the dubious distinction of being one of the most chuckle-inspiring titles in the history of Polish translations due to the fact that the pronunciation of the "sea"-meaning word ''morze'' and ''może'', the latter of which literally means "he/she/it can", sounds about the same. And when the verb ''może" is left without a complimentary, it is commonly associated with sexual prowess. So the whole title, when read aloud, might just as well say "An old man who can still get some".

to:

* Narm: {{Narm}}: The Polish title of the novella, ''Stary człowiek i morze'', while being a perfectly faithful rendition of the original, has the dubious distinction of being one of the most chuckle-inspiring titles in the history of Polish translations due to the fact that the pronunciation of the "sea"-meaning word ''morze'' and ''może'', the latter of which literally means "he/she/it can", sounds about the same. And when the verb ''może" is left without a complimentary, it is commonly associated with sexual prowess. So the whole title, when read aloud, might just as well say "An old man who can still get some".
26th Mar '16 9:41:22 PM Jaro7788
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Added DiffLines:

* Narm: The Polish title of the novella, ''Stary człowiek i morze'', while being a perfectly faithful rendition of the original, has the dubious distinction of being one of the most chuckle-inspiring titles in the history of Polish translations due to the fact that the pronunciation of the "sea"-meaning word ''morze'' and ''może'', the latter of which literally means "he/she/it can", sounds about the same. And when the verb ''może" is left without a complimentary, it is commonly associated with sexual prowess. So the whole title, when read aloud, might just as well say "An old man who can still get some".
7th Feb '16 8:26:50 AM Freshmeat
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* RealLifeWritesThePlot: Of a sort. Santiago for the most part is the standard Hemingway protagonist, i.e. [[TheAce a competent]], [[DuelToTheDeath utterly determined]] [[BadassNormal paragon of manliness]]. But he's also an [[BadassGrandpa old man]]. Hemingway was starting to age around the time he wrote Old Man, and it came right after he wrote Across the River and into the Trees[[labelnote:*]] Which Hemingway [[MagnumOpusDissonance actually considered]] his MagnumOpus[[/labelnote]], a book which got significant bad press. In a way, Santiago is probably something of a reflection upon the way Hemingway felt about himself.

to:

* RealLifeWritesThePlot: Of a sort. Santiago for the most part is the standard Hemingway protagonist, i.e. [[TheAce a competent]], [[DuelToTheDeath utterly determined]] [[BadassNormal paragon of manliness]]. But he's also an [[BadassGrandpa old man]]. Hemingway was starting to age around the time he wrote Old Man, and it came right after he wrote Across the River and into the Trees[[labelnote:*]] Which Hemingway [[MagnumOpusDissonance actually considered]] his MagnumOpus[[/labelnote]], masterpiece[[/labelnote]], a book which got significant bad press. In a way, Santiago is probably something of a reflection upon the way Hemingway felt about himself.
12th Sep '15 11:49:16 PM nombretomado
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Due to the symbolism, relatively easy prose and short length, ''The Old Man and the Sea'' is a mainstay of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanEducationalSystem high school English courses]], and is perhaps one of the most widely-read books in the United States (at least for people under thirty). It won the Pulitzer Prize in 1953 and pretty much sealed the deal on Hemingway's 1954 NobelPrizeInLiterature. It was adapted into a 1958 film with Creator/SpencerTracy and into a 1990 miniseries with Creator/AnthonyQuinn.

to:

Due to the symbolism, relatively easy prose and short length, ''The Old Man and the Sea'' is a mainstay of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanEducationalSystem high school English courses]], and is perhaps one of the most widely-read books in the United States (at least for people under thirty). It won the Pulitzer Prize in 1953 and pretty much sealed the deal on Hemingway's 1954 NobelPrizeInLiterature.UsefulNotes/NobelPrizeInLiterature. It was adapted into a 1958 film with Creator/SpencerTracy and into a 1990 miniseries with Creator/AnthonyQuinn.
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