History Literature / TheNakedSun

13th Jul '17 5:45:20 AM StFan
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{It is Pronounced Tro-PAY}}: Gladia's name is pronounced glah-DIE-ah.

to:

* {{It is Pronounced Tro-PAY}}: ItIsPronouncedTroPAY: Gladia's name is pronounced glah-DIE-ah.
30th Jun '17 3:49:29 PM MagBas
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The book was adapted into a Soviet TV movie in 1978, under the name of ''The Last Alternative''. Unfortunately, a lot of the text was cut out, leaving glaring PlotHoles, and that not counting the use of a heavily cut down translation. Add special effects cheap even for that time... in short, if not for the actors being mostly decent, it might have been DarthWiki/SoBadItsHorrible; as it is, it is hardly a worthy adaptation.

to:

The book was adapted into a Soviet TV movie in 1978, under the name of ''The Last Alternative''. Unfortunately, a lot of the text was cut out, leaving glaring PlotHoles, and that not counting the use of a heavily cut down translation. Add special effects cheap even for that time... in short, if not for the actors being mostly decent, it might have been DarthWiki/SoBadItsHorrible; as it is, it is hardly a worthy adaptation.\n
22nd Jun '17 7:14:08 PM Chariset
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DeliberateValuesDissonance: Part of the Solarian moral code is that personal contact is obscene. Even standing in the same room as another human induces more than a little {{Squick}} in most Solarians. Instead, they communicate using 3D holographs that are virtually indistinguishable from the real deal. The disconnect between "seeing" as opposed to "viewing" is extremely wide: viewing someone who is totally nude at the moment is completely acceptable, because hey, it's just ''viewing''. It's not like they're ''actually'' in the room with you. Furthermore, the subject of children and anything to do with them is considered vulgar -- Baley just saying the word "children" is enough to make one Solarian blanch.

to:

* DeliberateValuesDissonance: Part of the Solarian moral code is that personal contact is obscene. Even standing taboo: even being in the same room as with another human induces more than a little {{Squick}} in most Solarians. Instead, they communicate using person strikes Solarians as obscenely intimate. On the other hand, meeting with someone via 3D holographs that holograph (which are virtually indistinguishable from meeting in the real deal. flesh) is as impersonal as a telephone call. The disconnect between "seeing" as opposed to "viewing" is extremely wide: viewing someone who is totally nude at the moment is ''viewing'' someone's completely acceptable, because hey, it's just ''viewing''. It's not like they're ''actually'' in nude hologram is fine but ''seeing'' the room with you. same person fully clothed is pornographic. Furthermore, the subject of children and anything to do with them is considered vulgar -- Baley just saying the word "children" is enough to [[{{Squick}} make one Solarian blanch.blanch]].



* SexIsEvil: Not because Solarians consider it immoral, but because it is the epitome of what they despise most: physical contact. Plus, it is the one form of physical contact they are required to engage in for the sake of their society (except for medical treatment, but that is [[WeWillHavePerfectHealthInTheFuture only occasionally necessary]]). Gladia actually considers herself a sexual deviant simply because, unlike everyone else on her world, physical contact ''doesn't'' repulse her.

to:

* SexIsEvil: Not because Solarians consider it immoral, but because it is the epitome of what they despise most: physical contact. Plus, it is the one form of physical contact they are required to engage in for the sake of their society (except for medical treatment, but that is [[WeWillHavePerfectHealthInTheFuture only occasionally necessary]]). Gladia actually considers herself a sexual deviant simply because, unlike everyone else on her world, because the thought of physical contact ''doesn't'' repulse doesn't ''repulse'' her.
16th Mar '17 10:40:06 AM Synch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ScienceMarchesOn: It's a major plot point that marriage is only still necessary because although artificial incubation of fetuses is the norm, humanity still must rely on in vivo fertilization. IVF would only be achieved 20 years after the novel, but we have still not achieved the means of artificial pregnancy.
15th Mar '17 4:42:20 PM Circeus
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ScienceMarchesOn: It's a major plot point that marriage is only still necessary because although artificial incubation of fetuses is the norm, humanity still must rely on in vivo fertilization. IVF would only be achieved 20 years after the novel, but we have still not achieved the means of artificial pregnancy.
7th Mar '17 11:04:39 PM Timjames98
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* GoodGirlsAvoidAbortion: It is at one point revealed that the artificial gestation facility on Solaria is manually operated because Robots would keep all the fetuses and embryos alive (including the imperfect ones). This, combined with the First Law Of Robotics (Robots must never harm humans) means that the within the story embryos and fetuses are living human beings.
2nd Mar '17 10:29:57 AM Synch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{Foreshadowing}}: The circumvention of the First Law in ''Literature/RobotsAndEmpire'' by [[spoiler:changing a robot's definition of human]] is hinted at in this book during the scene at the farm, when one of the robots [[spoiler:describes Earthmen as "inferior" humans, which apparently is part of its default programming]]. And though the robot denies it, Baley suspects this may have caused it to hesitate when the child it was guarding suddenly fired an arrow at him.

to:

* {{Foreshadowing}}: {{Foreshadowing}}:
**
The circumvention of the First Law in ''Literature/RobotsAndEmpire'' by [[spoiler:changing a robot's definition of human]] is hinted at in this book during the scene at the farm, when one of the robots [[spoiler:describes Earthmen as "inferior" humans, which apparently is part of its default programming]]. And though the robot denies it, Baley suspects this may have caused it to hesitate when the child it was guarding suddenly fired an arrow at him.him.
** As part of his work on the farm, Delmarre wanted to create robots that were sophisticated enough to understand that disciplining children for misbehaving is better for their development in the long term. As it turns out later, [[spoiler:Daneel and Giskard were already on their way to understanding this concept at a much higher level than anyone could have expected.]]



* RaisedByRobots: It goes without saying that given their aversion to human contact the Solarians simply cannot bear to be around children and robots perform all child-rearing tasks.

to:

* RaisedByRobots: It goes without saying that given their aversion to human contact the Solarians simply cannot bear to be around children and robots perform all most child-rearing tasks.tasks. There still has to be at least one human chaperone to keep them in line, since robots aren't so great at providing discipline.
6th Jan '17 3:22:48 AM Omeganian
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

The book was adapted into a Soviet TV movie in 1978, under the name of ''The Last Alternative''. Unfortunately, a lot of the text was cut out, leaving glaring PlotHoles, and that not counting the use of a heavily cut down translation. Add special effects cheap even for that time... in short, if not for the actors being mostly decent, it might have been DarthWiki/SoBadItsHorrible; as it is, it is hardly a worthy adaptation.
19th Jul '16 2:25:44 PM AnonFangeekGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HeKnowsTooMuch: [[spoiler: Rikaine was killed because he knew about Dr. Leebig's EvilPlan.]]



** Baley suggests that this was one of the murderer's motives - he was sexually attracted to Gladia, who refused what passed for his "advances" ([[spoiler:she refused an offer to become his assistant]]) and so hated both her and her husband. Of course, as a Solarian, there was no chance for him to act upon these urges anyway, even disregarding the fact that [[spoiler:this was Jothan Leebig, who would have not approached her under any circumstances, and likely would not have acknowledged such feelings even to himself.]]

to:

** Baley suggests that this was one of the murderer's motives - he was sexually attracted to Gladia, who refused what passed for his "advances" ([[spoiler:she refused an offer to become his assistant]]) and so hated both her and her husband. Of course, as a Solarian, there was no chance for him to act upon these urges anyway, even disregarding the fact that [[spoiler:this was Jothan Leebig, who would have not approached her under any circumstances, and likely would not have acknowledged such feelings even to himself.]]himself]]. Of course, Baley doesn't rely on just that.


Added DiffLines:

* UnwittingPawn: Robots cannot be ordered to murder humans, but they ''can'' be used in one. This happens with a robot that brought poisoned water to Hans Gruer (although Gruer doesn't die). [[spoiler: And then the robot that handed a poisoned arrow to Bik, and the robot whose arm was used to murder Rikaine Delmarre]].
19th Jul '16 1:49:16 PM AnonFangeekGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AmbiguousDisorder: Johan Leebig is extremely anti-social, and voluntarily stopped all human contact when he was a small child. Of course, [[ValuesDissonance in Solaria]], that was considered a good thing and [[LamarckWasRight proof humans were evolving past gregariousness]]. [[spoiler: He dislikes human presence so strongly that he was ready to ''conquer the galaxy'' just so that Solaria and its taboo on personal presence would remain untouched.]]



* DisproportionateRetribution: Discussed. When Baley points out Quemot as a suspect in Delmarre's murder, he suggests as a possible motive that Quemot could have been annoyed at losing too many chess games to Delmarre. When Quemont comments that losing some chess games doesn't seem like much of a motive, Baley says that some motives can seem all the world to the murderer and absolutely ridiculous to everyone else.



* NoodleIncident: Elijah mentions one case he was on where a murderer was caught only because he couldn't bring himself to break the custom of absolute silence in the communal restrooms.



* OurNudityIsDifferent: Gladia has no idea why Elijah would have a problem with her being semi-naked. After all, he's only viewing her as a hologram.
* PerfectPoison: Subverted. The poisoner uses too much poison, and the victim vomits most of it up before it can kill him. He does, however, spend the rest of the book recovering from the dose he ''did'' receive.

to:

* OurNudityIsDifferent: Solarian culture differentiates between "seeing" (actually being in the room with someone) and "viewing" (communicating from afar via highly-realistic hologram), and there's much less social restrictions on viewing, including no nudity taboo. When Gladia has a NakedFirstImpression with Elijah, she has no idea why Elijah he would have a problem with her being semi-naked. naked. After all, he's only viewing not seeing ''her'', he's just seeing a hologram in her as a hologram.
image.
* PerfectPoison: Subverted. The poisoner uses too much poison, much, and the victim vomits most of it up before it can kill him. He does, however, spend the rest of the book recovering from the dose he ''did'' receive.receive.
-->'''Baley''': You poisoners on Solaria don't know dosages. Lack of experience.
This list shows the last 10 events of 81. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheNakedSun