History Literature / TheLittleMatchGirl

23rd Feb '17 9:08:24 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* SparedByTheAdaptation: Some versions (mostly modern ones) change the ending to a family rescuing the little girl before she could die and giving her food and a warm bed.



* SparedByTheAdaptation: Some versions (mostly modern ones) change the ending to a family rescuing the little girl before she could die and giving her food and a warm bed.
20th Feb '17 2:32:32 AM Morgenthaler
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Added DiffLines:

* DeathOfAChild: Part of the reason it is considered such a tragic story- the titular character freezes to death on New Years Eve.
16th Feb '17 11:09:54 AM Tightwire
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On a cold New Year's Eve, a little girl freezes barefoot outside. She's sold none of her matches and is consequently afraid to return home, expecting a beating from her father. She looks into the window of the house she sits in front of, and imagines how nice it would be to celebrate with a family. The girl strikes her matches one by one, first trying to derive warmth, and then to see the beautiful images their light provides. She looks up and sees a shooting star, and recalls that her grandmother once told her that whenever a star streaks across the sky like that, a person goes to heaven. She lights all of her matches and it's as if she can celebrate with her grandmother right there, and on New Year's Day all that's left is her frozen body huddled against the building and surrounded by dead matches, smiling.

to:

On a cold New Year's Eve, a little girl freezes barefoot outside. She's sold none of her matches and is consequently afraid to return home, expecting a beating from her father. She looks into the window of the house she sits in front of, and imagines how nice it would be to celebrate with a family. The girl strikes Then huddling in a corner, she begins to strike her matches one by one, at first trying to derive a little warmth, and then to see keep seeing the beautiful images of warm fires, roast goose and Christmas trees their light provides.shows. She looks up and sees a shooting star, and recalls that her grandmother once told her that whenever a star streaks across the sky like that, a person goes to heaven. She With the strike of another match, she sees her beloved grandmother, and lights all of her matches and it's as if she can celebrate with at once to keep her grandmother right there, and on there. The next morning, New Year's Day all that's left is Day, passing people find her frozen body huddled against the building and surrounded by dead matches, smiling.
smiling. They are filled with pity, but it doesn't matter because the little match girl is now happy in heaven.

Just a reminder; it's considered by its fans to be one of the saddest stories ever written (to the point its detractors have called it "Tragedy Porn"). The chances of it making you cry is somewhere above 90%.



Just a reminder; it's considered by its fans to be one of the saddest stories ever written (to the point its detractors have called it "Tragedy Porn"). The chances of it making you cry is somewhere above 90%.
16th Feb '17 10:56:23 AM Tightwire
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* HairOfGoldHeartOfGold: An innocent young girl, TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth.

to:

* HairOfGoldHeartOfGold: An innocent young girl, TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth.girl.
16th Feb '17 10:36:12 AM Tightwire
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* {{Disneyfication}}:
** Averted, even by Disney. Unlike most of Andersen's other works, adaptations usually stick with the original story. The only exception is the Michael Sporn version [[spoiler:where she had a DisneyDeath and eventually revives in that adaptation.]]
** That said, many adaptations ''do'' paint the events as a tragedy, while the tone of the original treats this as a happy ending.
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ggHw9nWYFk&wide=1 In one film version,]] the Virgin Mary takes the girl to Heaven. It is unclear if the little girl is meant to be dead or if she is taken to Heaven physically, which is an obvious parallel to the Virgin Mary herself.
** In the ''HBO Storybook Musicals'' version the little girl does not die and it ends HappilyEverAfter.
** In a German adaption, she still dies, but her death leads to the arrest of the leader of her OrphanageOfFear which improves the other orphans' lives significantly. Also, she actually sold her matches but bought another orphans matches so he doesn't go home without having sold anything. So her death could be interpreted as a HeroicSacrifice.
** A rather dark aversion came along with Creator/ChristopherNielsen when he related the story of the female drug addict Audrey, replacing the matches with heroin shots. Every hallucination (the Christmas tree, the dinner and her grandmother) was drug-induced, and the final "match" was an overdose.
** Strangely enough it happens in Literature/{{Discworld}} (Along with a TakeThat), where Death, standing in for the Hogfather (Discworld's equivalent to Santa Claus) finds the little match girl lying in an alley surrounded by her burnt-out matches. His assistant Albert explains that dying is sort of her purpose, and [[TakeThat makes people feel better about their own poor situations]]. Death is very cross at the fact that a child is freezing to death in the streets even at Hogswatch and revives the little girl, even though it's against the rules. Death is not allowed to bring back the dead, but the Hogfather can.

to:

* {{Disneyfication}}:
{{Disneyfication}}: Less than you expect.
** Averted, even by Disney. Unlike most of Andersen's other works, adaptations usually stick with the original story. The only exception is the Michael Sporn version [[spoiler:where she had a DisneyDeath and eventually revives in that adaptation.]]
** That said, many adaptations ''do'' paint In the events as a tragedy, while the tone of the original treats this as a happy ending.
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ggHw9nWYFk&wide=1 In one film version,]] the Virgin Mary takes the girl to Heaven. It is unclear if
''HBO Storybook Musicals'' version the little girl is meant to be dead or if she is taken to Heaven physically, which is an obvious parallel to the Virgin Mary herself.does not die and it ends HappilyEverAfter.
** In the ''HBO Storybook Musicals'' version the little girl does not die and it ends HappilyEverAfter.
** In a German adaption, she still dies, but her death leads to the arrest of the leader of her OrphanageOfFear which improves the other orphans' lives significantly. Also, she actually sold her matches but bought another orphans matches so he doesn't go home without having sold anything. So her death could be interpreted as a HeroicSacrifice.
** A rather dark aversion came along with Creator/ChristopherNielsen when he related the story of the female drug addict Audrey, replacing the matches with heroin shots. Every hallucination (the Christmas tree, the dinner and her grandmother) was drug-induced, and the final "match" was an overdose.
** Strangely enough it happens in
Literature/{{Discworld}} (Along (along with a TakeThat), where Death, standing in for the Hogfather (Discworld's equivalent to Santa Claus) finds the little match girl lying in an alley surrounded by her burnt-out matches. His assistant Albert explains that dying is sort of her purpose, and [[TakeThat makes people feel better about their own poor situations]]. Death is very cross at the fact that a child is freezing to death in the streets even at Hogswatch and revives the little girl, even though it's against the rules. Death is not allowed to bring back the dead, but the Hogfather can.
16th Feb '17 10:33:06 AM Tightwire
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** A rather dark aversion came along with Creator/ChristopherNielsen when he related the story of the female drug addict Audrey, replacing the matches with heroin shots. Every hallucination (the christmas tree, the dinner and finally the grandmother) was drug-induced, and the final "match" was an overdose.
** Strangely enough it happens in Literature/{{Discworld}} (Along with a TakeThat), where Death, standing in for the Hogfather (Discworld's equivalent to Santa Claus) finds the the dead little match girl. His assistant explains that dying is sort of her purpose, [[TakeThat makes people feel better about not having it as bad as she does]]. Death doesn't buy it and revives the girl - despite the fact that it's against Death's own rules. Death cannot bring back the dead.

to:

** A rather dark aversion came along with Creator/ChristopherNielsen when he related the story of the female drug addict Audrey, replacing the matches with heroin shots. Every hallucination (the christmas Christmas tree, the dinner and finally the her grandmother) was drug-induced, and the final "match" was an overdose.
** Strangely enough it happens in Literature/{{Discworld}} (Along with a TakeThat), where Death, standing in for the Hogfather (Discworld's equivalent to Santa Claus) finds the the dead little match girl. girl lying in an alley surrounded by her burnt-out matches. His assistant Albert explains that dying is sort of her purpose, and [[TakeThat makes people feel better about not having it as bad as she does]]. their own poor situations]]. Death doesn't buy it is very cross at the fact that a child is freezing to death in the streets even at Hogswatch and revives the girl - despite the fact that little girl, even though it's against Death's own the rules. Death cannot is not allowed to bring back the dead.dead, but the Hogfather can.
5th Jan '17 6:00:42 PM Luc
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* EsotericHappyEnding: A textbook example. Anderson insisted that the Girl ascending to Heaven was a happy ending, ignoring the fact that a girl just froze to death for no good reason.
5th Jan '17 5:19:05 PM Luc
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%% * EsotericHappyEnding: The original version possibly provides a textbook example of a Esoteric Happy Ending.

to:

%% * EsotericHappyEnding: The original version possibly provides a A textbook example of example. Anderson insisted that the Girl ascending to Heaven was a Esoteric Happy Ending.happy ending, ignoring the fact that a girl just froze to death for no good reason.
4th Jan '17 2:43:53 AM LordGro
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* EsotericHappyEnding: The original version possibly provides a textbook example of a Esoteric Happy Ending.

to:

%% * EsotericHappyEnding: The original version possibly provides a textbook example of a Esoteric Happy Ending.



* TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth: To quote from that page, "the narrative does not so much carry this trope as flamboyantly juggle it while singing the complete score to Handel's Messiah." Part of the reason most versions of the story are called "Tragedy Porn".

to:

* %%* TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth: To quote from that page, "the narrative does not so much carry this trope as flamboyantly juggle it while singing the complete score to Handel's Messiah." Part of the reason most versions of the story are called "Tragedy Porn".
4th Jan '17 2:40:32 AM Luc
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* EsotericHappyEnding: The original version possibly provides a textbook example of a Esoteric Happy Ending.



%%* TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth

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%%* TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth* TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth: To quote from that page, "the narrative does not so much carry this trope as flamboyantly juggle it while singing the complete score to Handel's Messiah." Part of the reason most versions of the story are called "Tragedy Porn".
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheLittleMatchGirl