History Literature / TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe

27th May '16 10:23:18 AM JoieDeCombat
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** All of Peter's tactics are terrible. He wastes most of his best fighters on a pointless charge into the heart of the enemy army when they are already charging into terrain that favors his more organized forces and nullifies the enemy numbers advantage. Then when that force is broken and has retreated he has no flankers to cut off the Queen and her vanguard when they follow them into the ravine. This is in contrast to the book, where he had actually nearly won the battle by the time Aslan and reinforcements showed up through superior tactics and Edmund destroying Jadis' wand.

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** All of Peter's tactics are terrible. He wastes most of his best fighters on a pointless charge into the heart of the enemy army when they are already charging into terrain that favors his more organized forces and nullifies the enemy numbers advantage. Then when that force is broken and has retreated he has no flankers to cut off the Queen and her vanguard when they follow them into the ravine. This is in contrast to the book, where he which establishes that Aslan drills him intensively on tactics beforehand, with the result that Peter had actually nearly won the battle by the time Aslan and reinforcements showed up through his use of superior tactics and Edmund destroying Jadis' wand.
27th May '16 10:16:54 AM JoieDeCombat
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* AlwaysChaoticEvil: [[OurDwarvesAreDifferent Dwarfs]], Wolves, Minotaurs, Hags, Harpies, Giants and all the other races that are loyal to the witch initially appear this way, but it's later shown a good portion of them do have Good members, as seen by dwarfs, a giant, and even wolves rescued from the Witch's castle, who later fight for Aslan. Later books and films show many good Narnian dwarves, giants, and minotaurs. Indeed, if you only read those books you'd think the dwarfs are just another of the many AlwaysLawfulGood races in Narnia, with only a few bad apples. [[spoiler:Until the revolt of a large amount of them in Literature/TheLast Battle.]] However, in the only other appearance of a Hag and a Werewolf, in ''Literature/PrinceCaspian'', it's implied that they really are AlwaysChaoticEvil.

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* AlwaysChaoticEvil: [[OurDwarvesAreDifferent Dwarfs]], Wolves, Minotaurs, Hags, Harpies, Giants and all the other races that are loyal to the witch initially appear this way, but it's later shown a good portion of them do have Good members, as seen by dwarfs, a giant, and even wolves rescued from the Witch's castle, who later fight for Aslan. Later books and films show many good Narnian dwarves, giants, and minotaurs. Indeed, if you only read those books you'd think the dwarfs are just another of the many AlwaysLawfulGood races in Narnia, with only a few bad apples. [[spoiler:Until the revolt of a large amount of them in Literature/TheLast Battle.''Literature/TheLastBattle''.]] However, in the only other appearance of a Hag and a Werewolf, in ''Literature/PrinceCaspian'', it's implied that they really are AlwaysChaoticEvil.
27th May '16 10:08:09 AM Morgenthaler
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* WorldWarII: In the background; treated more prominently in the first film. The kids are in the Professor's house in the first place because they were sent into the country to get away from places that might be bombed.
27th May '16 10:07:28 AM Morgenthaler
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* YouImaginedIt: [[AvertedTrope Averted]]; none of the Pevensies were concussed or on hallucinogens at the time. The narrative suggests Lucy invoking this at the start but she won't because she's too truthful.
6th Apr '16 3:04:21 PM TheMightyHeptagon
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* RuleOfSymbolism: As a Christian allegory, nearly every one of the book's major plot points ties back into a corresponding plot point in the Gospels in some way or another.
** The Pevensie siblings come to see themselves as Aslan's disciples, and vow to carry out his will in Narnia by fighting the White Witch. Appropriately, there are four siblings (just as the Gospels were written by Christ's four closest Apostles), and {{the leader}} of the group is named "[[MeaningfulName Peter]]".
** Edmund's betrayal of the group (for Turkish Delight) is based on Judas Iscariot's betrayal of Jesus (for 20 pieces of silver). Aslan chooses to peacefully give himself up to the White Witch after his betrayal, just as Jesus chooses to peacefully give himself up to the Romans.
** Aslan's death and resurrection at the Stone Table is based on Jesus' crucifixion and resurrection. The innocent Aslan chooses to die in place of the traitor Edmund, just as the sinless Jesus chooses to die to atone for the sins of humanity. Before killing him, the White Witch's minions [[KickTheDog humiliate Aslan]] by binding him and forcibly shaving his mane, just as the Roman soldiers humiliate Jesus by stripping him naked, gambling for his clothes, forcing him to drink sour wine, and crowning him with thorns.
** The two girls in the quartet, Susan and Lucy, stay with Aslan to comfort him before his death, and are the first to find him alive after his miraculous resurrection, just as a group of women close to Jesus ([[DependingOnTheWriter including Mary Magdalene and at least one other woman]]) witness his crucifixion and first realize that he's alive after finding his tomb empty.
** The Stone Table, which represents the most ancient laws of Narnia, symbolically stands in for the divine law of the Old Testament (which was engraved on '''stone table'''ts given to Moses). Aslan's death and resurrection causes the table to crack, signifying the beginning of a new age built on Aslan's law. In the Christian Bible, Jesus' death and resurrection signifies the beginning of the New Testament, and the beginning of a new age based on Jesus' teachings.
9th Oct '15 11:56:22 PM PrincessGwen
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** Ironically, one of the outakes from the 2013 film shows the actor of Edmund shutting the door behind him as he climbs into the wardrobe...and demonstrating why Lewis was careful to emphasise the warning against doing that.

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** Ironically, one of the outakes from the 2013 2005 film shows the actor of Edmund shutting the door behind him as he climbs into the wardrobe...and demonstrating why Lewis was careful to emphasise the warning against doing that.
15th Sep '15 3:59:42 PM HeroGal2347
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* FaceScribbling: Edmund, during his nasty period, rather tackily scribbles a mustache and glasses on a lion that's been turned to stone, telling himself it must be Aslan himself, TakenForGranite.

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* FaceScribbling: FaceDoodling: Edmund, during his nasty period, rather tackily scribbles a mustache and glasses on a lion that's been turned to stone, telling himself it must be Aslan himself, TakenForGranite.
15th Sep '15 3:55:57 PM HeroGal2347
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* FaceScribbling: Edmund, during his nasty period, rather tackily scribbles a mustache and glasses on a lion that's been turned to stone, telling himself it must be Aslan himself, TakenForGranite.
15th Sep '15 10:40:11 AM eroock
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* DontTryThisAtHome: Every time someone climbs into the wardrobe, to the point where one begins to wonder if it's an inside joke or a RunningGag.



* DontTryThisAtHome: Every time someone climbs into the wardrobe, to the point where one begins to wonder if it's an inside joke or a RunningGag.



* TheMarvelousDeer: The wish-granting stag -- that is not caught. Instead the hunt sends them back home.



* TheMarvelousDeer: The wish-granting stag -- that is not caught. Instead the hunt sends them back home.
16th Aug '15 7:24:20 PM Jillie_chan
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**However it is what is known as an "Eye rhyme". Each line ends with "-one"making it look like it SHOULD rhyme.
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