History Literature / TheHistoryOfMiddleEarth

30th Nov '16 7:36:17 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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--> A Silmaril. This swear we all…

to:

--> A Silmaril. This swear we all…all...



--> Darkness doom us if our deed faileth…

to:

--> Darkness doom us if our deed faileth…faileth...



* {{Expy}} and SelfInsertFic: "The Notion Club Papers" is Tolkien parodying his own meetings with the Inklings —- "Notion Club" being a pun on that name -— and a way for him to criticise C.S. Lewis' ideas in his Space Trilogy by having characters discuss it. It later evolved into a story about characters having ancestral memories of Númenor.\\

to:

* {{Expy}} and SelfInsertFic: "The Notion Club Papers" is Tolkien parodying his own meetings with the Inklings —- -- "Notion Club" being a pun on that name -— -- and a way for him to criticise C.S. Lewis' ideas in his Space Trilogy by having characters discuss it. It later evolved into a story about characters having ancestral memories of Númenor.\\



* PropheciesAreAlwaysRight: The original form of the Doom of Mandos is "Great is the Fall of Gondolin," uttered years before the founding of that city (though no-one seems to remember the words when the city gets named...)

to:

* PropheciesAreAlwaysRight: The original form of the Doom of Mandos is "Great is the Fall of Gondolin," uttered years before the founding of that city (though no-one seems to remember the words when the city gets named...)).
27th Nov '16 2:49:15 PM nombretomado
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* AllMythsAreTrue: In particular with ''The Book of Lost Tales'' and still to a lesser extent later. As Tolkien's friend Creator/CSLewis would go on to do with ''{{Narnia}}'', the works reconcile the idea of pagan gods with Christian theology, and include stories based on those from Myth/NorseMythology. The short explanation is that the gods are actually angelic beings delegated by God to build and maintain the world, and to oppose {{Satan}}.

to:

* AllMythsAreTrue: In particular with ''The Book of Lost Tales'' and still to a lesser extent later. As Tolkien's friend Creator/CSLewis would go on to do with ''{{Narnia}}'', ''[[Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia Narnia]]'', the works reconcile the idea of pagan gods with Christian theology, and include stories based on those from Myth/NorseMythology. The short explanation is that the gods are actually angelic beings delegated by God to build and maintain the world, and to oppose {{Satan}}.
28th Sep '16 12:03:58 AM priestessofdan
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* FramingDevice: ''The Book of Lost Tales'' is presented as a series of stories told to a mariner (Eriol or Ælfwine), who stumbles upon the island of Tol Eressëa and learns the Elves' history, which he then brings back to his human kindred. This doubles as a LiteraryAgentHypothesis frequently repeated throughout the Middle-Earth stories.

to:

* FramingDevice: ''The Book of Lost Tales'' is presented as a series of stories told to a mariner (Eriol or Ælfwine), Elfwine), who stumbles upon the island of Tol Eressëa and learns the Elves' history, which he then brings back to his human kindred. This doubles as a LiteraryAgentHypothesis frequently repeated throughout the Middle-Earth stories.



* GenerationXerox: In ''The Notion Club Papers'', there's a recurring theme of a father who's lost at sea and a son who follows in his footsteps: Tuor and Eärendil, Amandil and Elendil, Eädwine and Ælfwine, and Edwin and Alwin Lowdham.

to:

* GenerationXerox: In ''The Notion Club Papers'', there's a recurring theme of a father who's lost at sea and a son who follows in his footsteps: Tuor and Eärendil, Amandil and Elendil, Eädwine and Ælfwine, Elfwine, and Edwin and Alwin Lowdham.



* IntangibleTimeTravel: Having agreed with Creator/CSLewis that the two would write companion [[Literature/TheSpaceTrilogy space-travel]] and time-travel stories, JRRT twice tried to start a story revolving around this trope, but never finished. The first attempt is "The Lost Road" that gives its name to vol. V. The second is "The Notion Club Papers" in vol. IX. Both versions of the story tell of a father-son pair in England who experience repeated intangible Time-Travel dreams/visions, taking them back to past father-son pairs with the same names in older languages, who experience the same dreams/visions, recursively going back until reaching the original Elendil and son in Númenor and witnessing its downfall. It was going to involve around a half-dozen pairs of guys, numerous European myths, speaking in tongues, deciphering the Númenórean language, and possibly watching Ælfwine see or even travel the Strait Road to Eressëa. JRRT even considered including (pessimistic) references to his own unfinished ''Silmarillion'' manuscripts being uncovered.

to:

* IntangibleTimeTravel: Having agreed with Creator/CSLewis that the two would write companion [[Literature/TheSpaceTrilogy space-travel]] and time-travel stories, JRRT twice tried to start a story revolving around this trope, but never finished. The first attempt is "The Lost Road" that gives its name to vol. V. The second is "The Notion Club Papers" in vol. IX. Both versions of the story tell of a father-son pair in England who experience repeated intangible Time-Travel dreams/visions, taking them back to past father-son pairs with the same names in older languages, who experience the same dreams/visions, recursively going back until reaching the original Elendil and son in Númenor and witnessing its downfall. It was going to involve around a half-dozen pairs of guys, numerous European myths, speaking in tongues, deciphering the Númenórean language, and possibly watching Ælfwine Elfwine see or even travel the Strait Road to Eressëa. JRRT even considered including (pessimistic) references to his own unfinished ''Silmarillion'' manuscripts being uncovered.



** In the oldest draft, the history of the Elves supposedly came to us through Eriol, a sea-farer from 5th century Jutland; in the second draft Eriol was replaced by Ælfwine, a 10th century Anglo-Saxon mariner who stumbled upon Tol Eressëa.

to:

** In the oldest draft, the history of the Elves supposedly came to us through Eriol, a sea-farer from 5th century Jutland; in the second draft Eriol was replaced by Ælfwine, Elfwine, a 10th century Anglo-Saxon mariner who stumbled upon Tol Eressëa.



** The whole concept of Elvenhome (the island-ferry used to transport the Elves to Valinor) becoming England, the Elves being displaced by Eriol/Ælfwine's Anglo-Saxon cousins, and Avallone (capital of the exiled Noldor) becoming Warwick.

to:

** The whole concept of Elvenhome (the island-ferry used to transport the Elves to Valinor) becoming England, the Elves being displaced by Eriol/Ælfwine's Eriol/Elfwine's Anglo-Saxon cousins, and Avallone (capital of the exiled Noldor) becoming Warwick.



* TheWatson: Ælfwine/Eriol. In the FramingDevice of ''The Book of Lost Tales'' he serves as the AudienceSurrogate to whom the elves of the Lonely Isle relate the history of the Elder Days. Ælfwine's role continues, though far less emphasized, in later versions of the legendarium.

to:

* TheWatson: Ælfwine/Eriol.Elfwine/Eriol. In the FramingDevice of ''The Book of Lost Tales'' he serves as the AudienceSurrogate to whom the elves of the Lonely Isle relate the history of the Elder Days. Ælfwine's Elfwine's role continues, though far less emphasized, in later versions of the legendarium.
28th Sep '16 12:01:56 AM priestessofdan
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** Played with in ''Morgoth's Ring''. Ælfwine, the Anglo-Saxon seaman who finds Eressëa, is told that today there are two groups of Elves still remaining in Middle-Earth, the Lingerers and the Unbodied. The Lingerers are simply Elves that stayed until their [[OurSoulsAreDifferent souls burnt up their bodies]] and live in an aethereal form. The Unbodied are those that refused the summons to be judged by Mandos when they died. Lingerers tend to be gentle and harmless but flawed creatures that hang around wild lands as GeniusLoci, but sometimes visit mortals in dreams. Unbodied are actual ghosts and are not only likely to deceive mortals maliciously, but try to [[DemonicPossession steal their bodies]]. In a way Lingerers are like "Seelie" and Unbodied like "Unseelie".

to:

** Played with in ''Morgoth's Ring''. Ælfwine, Elfwine, the Anglo-Saxon seaman who finds Eressëa, is told that today there are two groups of Elves still remaining in Middle-Earth, the Lingerers and the Unbodied. The Lingerers are simply Elves that stayed until their [[OurSoulsAreDifferent souls burnt up their bodies]] and live in an aethereal form. The Unbodied are those that refused the summons to be judged by Mandos when they died. Lingerers tend to be gentle and harmless but flawed creatures that hang around wild lands as GeniusLoci, but sometimes visit mortals in dreams. Unbodied are actual ghosts and are not only likely to deceive mortals maliciously, but try to [[DemonicPossession steal their bodies]]. In a way Lingerers are like "Seelie" and Unbodied like "Unseelie".
28th Sep '16 12:01:08 AM priestessofdan
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* AnimalJingoism: The original "Tale of Tinúviel" is a mythological origin for Cats vs. Dogs -- in that version, Huan fights great cats rather than wolves (except for Karkaras/Carcharoth). At the end he takes Tevildo's golden collar and all the other cats shrink.

to:

* AnimalJingoism: The original "Tale of Tinúviel" Tinuviel" is a mythological origin for Cats vs. Dogs -- in that version, Huan fights great cats rather than wolves (except for Karkaras/Carcharoth). At the end he takes Tevildo's golden collar and all the other cats shrink.



Even some of the names of the Notion Club members are references to Tolkien's own life. One of them is named John Jethro Rashbold (Tolkien's own first name was John; Jethro is a name closely associated in the Old Testament with Tolkien's middle name Reuel; and "Rashbold" is a calque on the name Tolkien, which comes from the German ''Tollkühn'', meaning 'foolhardy'), and another is named Ramer, an old dialectal word for "raving madman" -- JRRT had written a poem called "Looney" not too many years before. Alvin Arundel Lowdham has two names that connect to Tolkien's mythology: Alvin comes from the Old English ''Ælfwine'', "Elf-friend", and it's implied he's the "reincarnation" of another Tolkien character by that name; Arundel is the modern-English form of ''Earendel'', the name that inspired Tolkien's first poems about Middle-Earth and eventually emerged as Eárendil in ''Literature/TheSilmarillion''.

to:

Even some of the names of the Notion Club members are references to Tolkien's own life. One of them is named John Jethro Rashbold (Tolkien's own first name was John; Jethro is a name closely associated in the Old Testament with Tolkien's middle name Reuel; and "Rashbold" is a calque on the name Tolkien, which comes from the German ''Tollkühn'', meaning 'foolhardy'), and another is named Ramer, an old dialectal word for "raving madman" -- JRRT had written a poem called "Looney" not too many years before. Alvin Arundel Lowdham has two names that connect to Tolkien's mythology: Alvin comes from the Old English ''Ælfwine'', ''Elfwine'', "Elf-friend", and it's implied he's the "reincarnation" of another Tolkien character by that name; Arundel is the modern-English form of ''Earendel'', the name that inspired Tolkien's first poems about Middle-Earth and eventually emerged as Eárendil in ''Literature/TheSilmarillion''.
31st Aug '16 5:58:12 AM narm00
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* FurAgainstFang: Both races -vampires and werewolves- work for the same masters -Dark Lords Morgoth and Sauron-, but [[TeethClenchedTeamwork they can not stand each other]]. Werewolves despised vampires, considering them “rats with wings” and vampires regarded wolves like big bullies. It is less evident in ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'', but when you read the meeting with [[SavageWolves Carcharoth]] in the Lay of Beren and Luthien'', the text makes clear that Carcharoth is shocked of seeing a vampire and wolf together and wolves hate wampires.

to:

* FurAgainstFang: Both races -vampires and werewolves- work for the same masters -Dark Lords Morgoth and Sauron-, but [[TeethClenchedTeamwork they can not stand each other]]. Werewolves despised vampires, considering them “rats with wings” and vampires regarded wolves like big bullies. It is less evident in ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'', but when you read the meeting with [[SavageWolves Carcharoth]] in the Lay of Beren and Luthien'', the text makes clear that Carcharoth is shocked of at seeing a vampire and wolf together and as wolves hate wampires.vampires.



* NamesTheSame: Tolkien changed names of characters and locations at least once with every draft or linguistic revision, and also recycled old ones. Names that would later be applied to well-known characters in ''The Lord of the Rings'' show up many years before that book was conceived, attached to completely unrelated characters.
** For example, one Gimli first appears in the "Tale of Tinuviel" (written in 1918-1920) as a "Gnome"[[note]]which, strangely enough, at this stage was a synonym for Noldorin Elf[[/note]] and fellow prisoner of Beren in Tevildo's kitchens.
** Legolas Greenleaf was first the name of an elf leading the fleeing people of Gondolin over the plains of Tumladen and over the pass of the Cirith Thoronarth.
** Even within the ''Silmarillion'' part of the legendarium, names sometimes switch places bizarrely. For a short time Beren was named Maglor.



* ScienceMarchesOn: Tolkien firmly believed that space travel was physically impossible; in ''The Notion Club Papers'', which takes place in 1987, it still hasn't been accomplished. About a decade later, Sputnik would prove him wrong.



* SpeechCentricWork: "Athrabeth Finrod ah Andreth" in ''Morgoth's Ring'' is a 19-page conversation between Finrod and a mortal women about mortality, theology, and the cause and nature of the differences between Elves and Mortals. Except at the beginning and end, there's hardly a word of narration.

to:

* SpeechCentricWork: "Athrabeth Finrod ah Andreth" in ''Morgoth's Ring'' is a 19-page conversation between Finrod and a mortal women woman about mortality, theology, and the cause and nature of the differences between Elves and Mortals. Except at the beginning and end, there's hardly a word of narration.



* WhatCouldHaveBeen: The point of the ''History''.



* WriteWhatYouKnow: "The Fall of Gondolin" from ''The Book of Lost Tales'' part 2 is clearly inspired by Tolkien's then-recent experiences in WorldWarOne, down to Morgoth's mechanical dragons evoking the early tanks used in the war.
* WriteWhoYouKnow: "The Notion Club Papers" is an AffectionateParody of Tolkien's own experiences with the Inklings--in particular, Michael Ramer resembles Creator/CSLewis and Alwin Arundel Lowdham resembles Tolkien himself. Also, [[AuthorAvatar Author Avatars]] Alwin Arundel Lowdham from that story and Alboin Erroll from ''The Lost Road'' are both linguists.

to:

* WriteWhatYouKnow: "The Fall of Gondolin" from ''The Book of Lost Tales'' part 2 is clearly inspired by Tolkien's then-recent experiences in WorldWarOne, down to Morgoth's mechanical dragons evoking the early tanks used in the war.
* WriteWhoYouKnow: "The Notion Club Papers" is an AffectionateParody of Tolkien's own experiences with the Inklings--in particular, Michael Ramer resembles Creator/CSLewis and Alwin Arundel Lowdham resembles Tolkien himself. Also, [[AuthorAvatar Author Avatars]] Alwin Arundel Lowdham from that story and Alboin Erroll from ''The Lost Road'' are both linguists.
9th Aug '16 4:49:52 PM unokkun
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Even some of the names of the Notion Club members are references to Tolkien's own life. One of them is named John Jethro Rashbold (Tolkien's own first name was John; Jethro is a name closely associated in the Old Testament with Tolkien's middle name Reuel; and "Rashbold" is a calque on the name Tolkien, which comes from the German ''Tollkühn'', meaning 'foolhardy'), and another is named Ramer, an old dialectal word for "raving madman" -- JRRT had written a poem called "Looney" not too many years before. Alvin Arundel Lowdham has two names that connect to Tolkien's mythology: Alvin comes from the Old English ''Ælfwine'', "Elf-friend", and it's implied he's the "reincarnation" of another Tolkien character by that name; Arundel is the modern-English form of ''Earendel'', the name that inspired Tolkien's first poems about Middle-Earth and eventually emerged as Eárendil in ''Literature/TheSilmarillion''.

to:

Even some of the names of the Notion Club members are references to Tolkien's own life. One of them is named John Jethro Rashbold (Tolkien's own first name was John; Jethro is a name closely associated in the Old Testament with Tolkien's middle name Reuel; and "Rashbold" is a calque on the name Tolkien, which comes from the German ''Tollkühn'', meaning 'foolhardy'), and another is named Ramer, an old dialectal word for "raving madman" -- JRRT had written a poem called "Looney" not too many years before. Alvin Arundel Lowdham has two names that connect to Tolkien's mythology: Alvin comes from the Old English ''Ælfwine'', "Elf-friend", and it's implied he's the "reincarnation" of another Tolkien character by that name; Arundel is the modern-English form of ''Earendel'', the name that inspired Tolkien's first poems about Middle-Earth and eventually emerged as Eárendil in ''Literature/TheSilmarillion''.



** Played with in ''Morgoth's Ring''. Ælfwine, the Anglo-Saxon seaman who finds Eressëa, is told that today there are two groups of Elves still remaining in Middle-Earth, the Lingerers and the Unbodied. The Lingerers are simply Elves that stayed until their [[OurSoulsAreDifferent souls burnt up their bodies]] and live in an aethereal form. The Unbodied are those that refused the summons to be judged by Mandos when they died. Lingerers tend to be gentle and harmless but flawed creatures that hang around wild lands as GeniusLoci, but sometimes visit mortals in dreams. Unbodied are actual ghosts and are not only likely to deceive mortals maliciously, but try to [[DemonicPossession steal their bodies]]. In a way Lingerers are like "Seelie" and Unbodied like "Unseelie".
* FramingDevice: ''The Book of Lost Tales'' is presented as a series of stories told to a mariner (Eriol or Ælfwine), who stumbles upon the island of Tol Eressëa and learns the Elves' history, which he then brings back to his human kindred. This doubles as a LiteraryAgentHypothesis frequently repeated throughout the Middle-Earth stories.

to:

** Played with in ''Morgoth's Ring''. Ælfwine, the Anglo-Saxon seaman who finds Eressëa, is told that today there are two groups of Elves still remaining in Middle-Earth, the Lingerers and the Unbodied. The Lingerers are simply Elves that stayed until their [[OurSoulsAreDifferent souls burnt up their bodies]] and live in an aethereal form. The Unbodied are those that refused the summons to be judged by Mandos when they died. Lingerers tend to be gentle and harmless but flawed creatures that hang around wild lands as GeniusLoci, but sometimes visit mortals in dreams. Unbodied are actual ghosts and are not only likely to deceive mortals maliciously, but try to [[DemonicPossession steal their bodies]]. In a way Lingerers are like "Seelie" and Unbodied like "Unseelie".
* FramingDevice: ''The Book of Lost Tales'' is presented as a series of stories told to a mariner (Eriol or Ælfwine), who stumbles upon the island of Tol Eressëa and learns the Elves' history, which he then brings back to his human kindred. This doubles as a LiteraryAgentHypothesis frequently repeated throughout the Middle-Earth stories.



* GenerationXerox: In ''The Notion Club Papers'', there's a recurring theme of a father who's lost at sea and a son who follows in his footsteps: Tuor and Eärendil, Amandil and Elendil, Eädwine and Ælfwine, and Edwin and Alwin Lowdham.

to:

* GenerationXerox: In ''The Notion Club Papers'', there's a recurring theme of a father who's lost at sea and a son who follows in his footsteps: Tuor and Eärendil, Amandil and Elendil, Eädwine and Ælfwine, and Edwin and Alwin Lowdham.



* IntangibleTimeTravel: Having agreed with Creator/CSLewis that the two would write companion [[Literature/TheSpaceTrilogy space-travel]] and time-travel stories, JRRT twice tried to start a story revolving around this trope, but never finished. The first attempt is "The Lost Road" that gives its name to vol. V. The second is "The Notion Club Papers" in vol. IX. Both versions of the story tell of a father-son pair in England who experience repeated intangible Time-Travel dreams/visions, taking them back to past father-son pairs with the same names in older languages, who experience the same dreams/visions, recursively going back until reaching the original Elendil and son in Númenor and witnessing its downfall. It was going to involve around a half-dozen pairs of guys, numerous European myths, speaking in tongues, deciphering the Númenórean language, and possibly watching Ælfwine see or even travel the Strait Road to Eressëa. JRRT even considered including (pessimistic) references to his own unfinished ''Silmarillion'' manuscripts being uncovered.

to:

* IntangibleTimeTravel: Having agreed with Creator/CSLewis that the two would write companion [[Literature/TheSpaceTrilogy space-travel]] and time-travel stories, JRRT twice tried to start a story revolving around this trope, but never finished. The first attempt is "The Lost Road" that gives its name to vol. V. The second is "The Notion Club Papers" in vol. IX. Both versions of the story tell of a father-son pair in England who experience repeated intangible Time-Travel dreams/visions, taking them back to past father-son pairs with the same names in older languages, who experience the same dreams/visions, recursively going back until reaching the original Elendil and son in Númenor and witnessing its downfall. It was going to involve around a half-dozen pairs of guys, numerous European myths, speaking in tongues, deciphering the Númenórean language, and possibly watching Ælfwine see or even travel the Strait Road to Eressëa. JRRT even considered including (pessimistic) references to his own unfinished ''Silmarillion'' manuscripts being uncovered.



** In the oldest draft, the history of the Elves supposedly came to us through Eriol, a sea-farer from 5th century Jutland; in the second draft Eriol was replaced by Ælfwine, a 10th century Anglo-Saxon mariner who stumbled upon Tol Eressëa.

to:

** In the oldest draft, the history of the Elves supposedly came to us through Eriol, a sea-farer from 5th century Jutland; in the second draft Eriol was replaced by Ælfwine, a 10th century Anglo-Saxon mariner who stumbled upon Tol Eressëa.



** The whole concept of Elvenhome (the island-ferry used to transport the Elves to Valinor) becoming England, the Elves being displaced by Eriol/Ælfwine's Anglo-Saxon cousins, and Avallone (capital of the exiled Noldor) becoming Warwick.

to:

** The whole concept of Elvenhome (the island-ferry used to transport the Elves to Valinor) becoming England, the Elves being displaced by Eriol/Ælfwine's Anglo-Saxon cousins, and Avallone (capital of the exiled Noldor) becoming Warwick.



* TheWatson: Ælfwine/Eriol. In the FramingDevice of ''The Book of Lost Tales'' he serves as the AudienceSurrogate to whom the elves of the Lonely Isle relate the history of the Elder Days. Ælfwine's role continues, though far less emphasized, in later versions of the legendarium.

to:

* TheWatson: Ælfwine/Eriol. In the FramingDevice of ''The Book of Lost Tales'' he serves as the AudienceSurrogate to whom the elves of the Lonely Isle relate the history of the Elder Days. Ælfwine's role continues, though far less emphasized, in later versions of the legendarium.
9th Aug '16 4:16:26 PM unokkun
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* EvenBadMenLoveTheirMamas: In "The Shibboleth of Fëanor," Fëanor came to think that the shift from using "þ" (in modern letters, "th") to "s" in Quenya was a conspiracy against himself and his mother. "Míriel þerindë" became "Míriel Serindë." Fëanor told his sons to ignore the use of "s" by his half-brothers and their houses: "We speak as is right, and as King Finwë himself did before he was led astray." This further widened the division between Fëanor and his half-brothers.

to:

* EvenBadMenLoveTheirMamas: In "The Shibboleth of Fëanor," Fëanor", Fëanor came to think that the shift from using "þ" (in modern letters, (usually romanized as "th") to "s" in the Noldorin dialect of Quenya was a conspiracy against himself and his mother. "Míriel þerindë" Þerindë" became "Míriel Serindë." Serindë". Fëanor told his sons to ignore the use of "s" by his half-brothers and their houses: "We speak as is right, and as King Finwë himself did before he was led astray." This further widened the division between Fëanor and his half-brothers.
31st Jan '16 5:18:03 AM fusilcontrafusil
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A precursor to the series is ''Literature/UnfinishedTales'', published 1980, which is edited and presented in the same style but is arranged according to in-universe chronology, unlike The ''History'' proper.

to:

A precursor to the series is ''Literature/UnfinishedTales'', published 1980, which is edited and presented in the same style but is arranged according to in-universe chronology, unlike The ''History'' proper.
proper. They were finally followed by the two-part ''The History of The Hobbit'' by John Rateliff, published 2007.
23rd Sep '15 4:51:49 PM nombretomado
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* AllMythsAreTrue: In particular with ''The Book of Lost Tales'' and still to a lesser extent later. As Tolkien's friend Creator/CSLewis would go on to do with ''{{Narnia}}'', the works reconcile the idea of pagan gods with Christian theology, and include stories based on those from NorseMythology. The short explanation is that the gods are actually angelic beings delegated by God to build and maintain the world, and to oppose {{Satan}}.

to:

* AllMythsAreTrue: In particular with ''The Book of Lost Tales'' and still to a lesser extent later. As Tolkien's friend Creator/CSLewis would go on to do with ''{{Narnia}}'', the works reconcile the idea of pagan gods with Christian theology, and include stories based on those from NorseMythology.Myth/NorseMythology. The short explanation is that the gods are actually angelic beings delegated by God to build and maintain the world, and to oppose {{Satan}}.



* ElvesVsDwarves: The ''Lost Tales'' present the origins of the conflict, as in ''The Silmarillion'', but the Dwarves are presented as another evil race comparable to Orcs (the influence of NorseMythology being obvious). It wouldn't be until ''The Hobbit'' (originally not part of Middle-Earth at all) that they got to be sympathetic characters -- and indeed given the Wood-elves of that book were essentially a recycled version of Tinwelint's folk from the ''Lost Tales'', it can even be considered a PerspectiveFlip.

to:

* ElvesVsDwarves: The ''Lost Tales'' present the origins of the conflict, as in ''The Silmarillion'', but the Dwarves are presented as another evil race comparable to Orcs (the influence of NorseMythology Myth/NorseMythology being obvious). It wouldn't be until ''The Hobbit'' (originally not part of Middle-Earth at all) that they got to be sympathetic characters -- and indeed given the Wood-elves of that book were essentially a recycled version of Tinwelint's folk from the ''Lost Tales'', it can even be considered a PerspectiveFlip.



* OurDwarvesAreAllTheSame: Dwarves were originally just another evil race similar to Orcs, derived closely from NorseMythology. It wasn't until ''The Hobbit'' that they became a primarily 'good' and sympathetic race -- and that version of them wasn't originally intended to be part of Middle-Earth at all.

to:

* OurDwarvesAreAllTheSame: Dwarves were originally just another evil race similar to Orcs, derived closely from NorseMythology.Myth/NorseMythology. It wasn't until ''The Hobbit'' that they became a primarily 'good' and sympathetic race -- and that version of them wasn't originally intended to be part of Middle-Earth at all.



** The original "Tale of Turambar" includes one to Sigurd from NorseMythology, in which the teller of the story mentions that men think that eating the heart of a dragon allows you to understand all tongues, but this is a false belief because the blood of a dragon is poisonous.

to:

** The original "Tale of Turambar" includes one to Sigurd from NorseMythology, Myth/NorseMythology, in which the teller of the story mentions that men think that eating the heart of a dragon allows you to understand all tongues, but this is a false belief because the blood of a dragon is poisonous.
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