History Literature / TheGrapesOfWrath

2nd Aug '16 11:48:02 PM rachiebird
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* TheAlcoholic: Uncle John.

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* TheAlcoholic: Uncle John.John normally stays away from alcohol, sex, and other such things, but when he gets drunk, he gets really drunk.



** Somewhat subverted with the Joad's car. Al's careful selection in the beginning, and his overall technical know-how mean that they never have any real trouble with the truck.

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** Somewhat subverted with the Joad's car. Al's careful selection in the beginning, as well as his and his overall Tom's technical know-how mean that they never have any real trouble with the truck.


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* FriendToAllChildren: Uncle John. One of the ways he makes up for his guilt over his wife's death is by being especially kind to children. In Hooverville, he can't bring himself to eat his dinner because of the starving children watching.
2nd Aug '16 11:32:01 PM rachiebird
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** Somewhat subverted with the Joad's car. Al's careful selection in the beginning, and his overall technical know-how mean that they never have any real trouble with the truck.
13th Jul '15 5:09:11 PM Llygodenfawr
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* TheAllegedCar: The Joad's car, and pretty much every one that the Okies use to go to California.

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* TheAllegedCar: The Joad's Joads' car, and pretty much every one that the Okies use to go to California.



* IronLady: Ma Joad She exemplifies all the traits but, most importantly, manages to hold the family together through sheer force of will alone. Mellower than most examples, see below trope.

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* IronLady: Ma Joad Joad. She exemplifies all the traits but, most importantly, manages to hold the family together through sheer force of will alone. Mellower than most examples, see below trope.
4th Jul '15 2:47:20 AM Aquila89
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* CapitalismIsBad: And it destroys the lives of the poor people of Oklahoma.

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* CapitalismIsBad: And it destroys the lives of the poor people of Oklahoma. It leads to farmers driven off their lands, because the tenant system is no longer profitable. It leads to employers exploiting mass unemployment by paying the workers the lowest wages possible - if they don't accept it, ten other men are waiting for the same job. It leads to food being destroyed to drive prices up, while people are literally starving to death nearby.
4th Jun '15 9:12:25 AM Raytina
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* AdultFear: All over the place. Losing your home, living in poverty, starving children, corrupt justice system, watching your friends get murdered, your son killed a man and has to go into hiding for it, problems with giving birth- just to name a few.

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* AdultFear: All over the place. Losing your home, living in poverty, starving children, corrupt justice system, watching your friends get murdered, your son killed a man and has to go into hiding for it, your husband/kids leave the family without you knowing, problems with giving birth- birth - just to name a few.
4th Jun '15 9:10:46 AM Raytina
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* AdultFear: All over the place.

to:

* AdultFear: All over the place. Losing your home, living in poverty, starving children, corrupt justice system, watching your friends get murdered, your son killed a man and has to go into hiding for it, problems with giving birth- just to name a few.
15th May '15 1:51:34 PM MarkLungo
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A 1939 novel by Creator/JohnSteinbeck, winner of the 1940 UsefulNotes/PulitzerPrize. The book makes a strong political statement (of the social liberal kind), and is pretty much the antithesis of anything by Creator/AynRand. The story follows a poor family from Oklahoma [[TheGreatDepression hit by the dust bowl]] that travel all the way to California (losing the grandparents along the way) to find jobs on farms. Sadly, they discover that work conditions are horrid and farms are overpopulated and people are paid poorly. The themes of the book made it very controversial in its day, and it is still divisive today. What isn't denied is that the book was extremely influential.

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A 1939 novel by Creator/JohnSteinbeck, winner of the 1940 UsefulNotes/PulitzerPrize. The book makes a strong political statement (of the social liberal kind), and is pretty much the antithesis of anything by Creator/AynRand. The story follows a poor family from Oklahoma [[TheGreatDepression hit by the dust bowl]] that travel all the way to California UsefulNotes/{{California}} (losing the grandparents along the way) to find jobs on farms. Sadly, they discover that work conditions are horrid and farms are overpopulated and people are paid poorly. The themes of the book made it very controversial in its day, and it is still divisive today. What isn't denied is that the book was extremely influential.
15th May '15 1:51:04 PM MarkLungo
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1939 novel by Creator/JohnSteinbeck, winner of the 1940 PulitzerPrize. The book makes a strong political statement (of the social liberal kind), and is pretty much the antithesis of anything by Creator/AynRand. The story follows a poor family from Oklahoma [[TheGreatDepression hit by the dust bowl]] that travel all the way to California (losing the grandparents along the way) to find jobs on farms. Sadly, they discover that work conditions are horrid and farms are overpopulated and people are paid poorly. The themes of the book made it very controversial in its day, and it is still divisive today. What isn't denied is that the book was extremely influential.

to:

A 1939 novel by Creator/JohnSteinbeck, winner of the 1940 PulitzerPrize.UsefulNotes/PulitzerPrize. The book makes a strong political statement (of the social liberal kind), and is pretty much the antithesis of anything by Creator/AynRand. The story follows a poor family from Oklahoma [[TheGreatDepression hit by the dust bowl]] that travel all the way to California (losing the grandparents along the way) to find jobs on farms. Sadly, they discover that work conditions are horrid and farms are overpopulated and people are paid poorly. The themes of the book made it very controversial in its day, and it is still divisive today. What isn't denied is that the book was extremely influential.
15th May '15 1:48:43 PM MarkLungo
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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/718587ddecefee8a1ba91dc6672758f2.jpg]]


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->''"Wherever there's a fight so hungry people can eat, I'll be there. Wherever there's a cop beating up a guy, I'll be there. I'll be in the way guys yell when they're mad. I'll be in the way kids laugh when they're hungry and they know supper's ready. And when the people eat the stuff they raise, and living in the houses they build, I'll be there, too."''
-->--'''Tom Joad'''
13th Mar '15 9:39:03 AM Raytina
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* TheAlcoholic: Uncle John.


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* TheCasanova: Al Joad.
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