History Literature / TheCryingOfLot49

23rd Oct '17 3:39:45 PM CassandraLeo
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ArtisticLicenseHistory: A lot of this is more on the part of the characters than Pynchon himself (who usually knows his stuff) and the basic errors in facts probably indicates their loose grasp on history. Mike Fallopian for instance notes that the Russian Tsar who abolished serfdom (and according to him, attacked Peter Pinguid to prevent France and England intervening on behalf of the South) is Nicholas II. The Tsar is actually Alexander II, while Nicholas II was the last tsar in Russian history, executed alongside his family by the Bolshevik regime at Yekaterinaburg.

to:

* ArtisticLicenseHistory: A lot of this is more on the part of the characters than Pynchon himself (who usually knows his stuff) and the basic errors in facts probably indicates indicate their loose grasp on history. Mike Fallopian for instance notes that the Russian Tsar who abolished serfdom (and according to him, attacked Peter Pinguid to prevent France and England intervening on behalf of the South) is Nicholas II. The Tsar is actually Alexander II, while Nicholas II was the last tsar in Russian history, executed alongside his family by the Bolshevik regime at Yekaterinaburg.


Added DiffLines:

* MundaneMadeAwesome: The central conspiracy of the novel concerns a centuries-old rivalry between two mail companies.
26th Sep '17 11:28:15 AM SeptimusHeap
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ShoutOut: When Serge of The Paranoids loses his 16-year old girlfriend to a middle-aged man, he writes a song that namechecks [[{{Lolita}} Humbert Humbert]]. As you would expect from a Pynchon novel, there are dozens of others.

to:

* ShoutOut: When Serge of The Paranoids loses his 16-year old girlfriend to a middle-aged man, he writes a song that namechecks [[{{Lolita}} [[Literature/{{Lolita}} Humbert Humbert]]. As you would expect from a Pynchon novel, there are dozens of others.
4th Sep '17 8:00:04 AM JustTroper
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* {{Mockspiracy}}: Trystero may be a delusion of Oedipa or an elaborate practival hoke by her deceased husband. Or it may be real after all.
15th Feb '17 3:15:28 PM JulianLapostat
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ArtisticLicenseHistory: A lot of this is more on the part of the characters than Pynchon himself (who usually knows his stuff) and the basic errors in facts probably indicates their loose grasp on history. Mike Fallopian for instance notes that the Russian Tsar who abolished serfdom (and according to him, attacked Peter Pinguid to prevent France and England intervening on behalf of the South) is Nicholas II. The Tsar is actually Alexander II, while Nicholas II was the last tsar in Russian history, executed alongside his family by the Bolshevik regime at Yekaterinaburg.



* BrokenMasquerade

to:

* BrokenMasqueradeBrokenMasquerade: The overall thesis is that Trystero after waiting in the shadows all this time might well decide to step into the light.



* ConspiracyTheory
* DownerEnding: [[spoiler:Regardless of whether or not Oedipa Maas manages to get anything done, it's completely for naught. Either nearly everyone she knows is part of a conspiracy (whether it's a genuine conspiracy or a joke her late husband - who might not even be dead - is playing on her, almost ''everyone'' is on it and against her), or she is insane, paranoid and detached from reality. And to top it off, no matter what, the experience has completely broken her.]]

to:

* ConspiracyTheory
ConspiracyTheory: The overall fuel for the novel's plot, is using conspiracy as a method by which to guide a character into a labyrinthine reality where random chance and tangents brush up with one another. The fact that these connections are tangential, random and are ambiguous in terms of "meaning" fuels the overall paranoid nature of the story.
* DownerEnding: [[spoiler:Regardless of A signficant plot point when Metzger and Oedipa discuss an old movie he made as a child star called ''Cashiered''. [[spoiler:Oedipa has to guess whether the movie has a happy or not sad ending. She assumes that like any Hollywood movie in UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode it had a happy ending. She eventually has sex with him anyway when the broadcast gets interrupted and Oedipa Maas manages to get anything done, it's completely for naught. Either nearly everyone believes it had a studio-mandated happy ending. After sleeping with Metzger she knows is part of a conspiracy (whether it's a genuine conspiracy or a joke her late husband - who might not even be dead - is playing on her, almost ''everyone'' is on it wakes up and against her), or she is insane, paranoid the TV shows the end of the film, which in fact ended on a downer with Metzger's character, his father and detached from reality. And to top it off, no matter what, the experience has completely broken her.]]his pet dog all drowning in a sunken submarine]].


Added DiffLines:

* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: Towards the end, Professor Emory Bortz notes that many anti-Trystero Germans came to America after the ''UsefulNotes/RevolutionsOf1848'' and they sought to stifle the growth of Trystero and prevent the revolution. The German immigrants who came to America in Forty-Eight were largely revolutionary exiles and many of them became vocal supporters of the Union cause and strong abolitionists and active in the American Left.
9th Feb '17 4:19:02 PM benda
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ItMakesJustAsMuchSenseInContext: The TitleDrop illuminates absolutely nothing.


Added DiffLines:

* TheReveal: Which makes it ''even worse'' for the reader. We get to know what [[TitleDrop the 49th lot]] is... and pretty much nothing else.
9th Feb '17 4:13:20 PM benda
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TitleDrop: In the very last sentence.

to:

* TitleDrop: In the The very last sentence.words of the novella.
9th Feb '17 4:12:05 PM benda
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Still on the ''Lolita'' train, it also contains an early usage of the term "nymphet", which might have helped popularize it.

to:

*** Still on the ''Lolita'' train, it also contains an early usage of the term "nymphet", which might have helped popularize it. Now you could tell that Pynchon was Nabokov's student at Cornell University (ironically, Nabokov himself didn't remember him at all).
7th Feb '17 2:44:33 AM JustTroper
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* MocksteryTale: The conspirological plot about Trystero is never resolved, and it is heavily implied to be a metaphor for the philosophical questions faced by mankind.
2nd Feb '17 11:44:42 AM JustTroper
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* PopCultureSymbology: Being a postmodern novel, it lives and breathes this trope. For example, it is implied that the villainous character dressed in black from [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Blow_Out one of the early Porky Pig cartoons]] was a reference to a real-life secret organization called Trystero.
19th Jun '16 2:04:17 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


''The Crying of Lot 49'' is a 1966 novel (or perhaps novella) by ThomasPynchon. It is about a woman named Oedipa Maas who unravels the rivalry between two mail distribution companies, Trystero and Thurn und Taxis. Possibly. Or maybe it's an elaborate prank. [[MindScrew Or maybe she is actually hallucinating it all.]]

to:

''The Crying of Lot 49'' is a 1966 novel (or perhaps novella) by ThomasPynchon.Creator/ThomasPynchon. It is about a woman named Oedipa Maas who unravels the rivalry between two mail distribution companies, Trystero and Thurn und Taxis. Possibly. Or maybe it's an elaborate prank. [[MindScrew Or maybe she is actually hallucinating it all.]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 32. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheCryingOfLot49