History Literature / TheCountofMonteCristo

17th Apr '18 11:30:26 PM PaulA
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* OffingTheOffspring: [[spoiler:After her crimes are discovered, Madame de Villefort kills herself and, to spite her husband, their son too.]]



* TheOldConvict: Abbe Faria. He teaches Dantes everything he will need to know for his new life on the outside, tells him where a fortune is hidden, and his death provides Dantes with his means of escape.



* UndyingLoyalty: Jacopo, Haydee and Ali to the Count.
* UnfriendlyFire: One of the characters tells a story about a bandit lord named Cucumetto who shot a treacherous underling in the back during a skirmish with some soldiers.



* WickedCultured: Luigi Vampa, Benedetto, and the Count himself.

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* WickedCultured: WickedCultured:
** The bandit leader,
Luigi Vampa, is a polite, nice guy who reads Caesar's ''[[Literature/CommentariesOnTheGallicWar Commentaries]]'' for fun. He's also a strong believer in punctuality, and if a ransom is not paid on time, he will calmly stab the kidnappee to death or shoot them in the head.
**
Benedetto, and the a young career criminal who has no trouble posing as a cultured aristocrat.
** The
Count himself.himself has impeccable taste and if not an outright villain, is a ruthless WellIntentionedExtremist.
* WickedStepmother: Madame Heloise de Villefort is the young wife of middle-aged prosecutor Villefort, with a spoiled eight-year-old son. She despises Valentine, Villefort's daughter by his previous marriage, because all of the property of her grandparents will revert to her rather than her step-brother. She eventually [[spoiler:goes on a killing spree, poisoning Valentine's maternal grandparents and attempting to poison her husband's paralytic father (his servant is killed instead). To escape justice, she poisons herself, and [[KicktheDog just to spite her husband]], kills [[OffingtheOffspring her son]] as well.]]



* YouAreNumberSix: Abbe Faria is prisoner number 27; Dantes is number 34.

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* YouAreNumberSix: While Edmond Dantès is imprisoned in the Château d'If, a new governor is put in charge. He doesn't want to bother learning the names of the prisoners, so he refers to them by the numbers of their cells. Abbe Faria is prisoner number 27; Dantes is number 34.




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* YoungConqueror: Luigi Vampa, a celebrated bandit, is analogized to one of these, because he's achieved power and celebrity and is not yet 30. Vampa may be aware of the comparison, since he likes to read Julius Caesar for fun.
* YoungLoveVersusOldHate: The once young and benevolent protagonist has turned to a bitter and vengeful old man, threatening to destroy not only the old men who once wronged him, but also the next generation of people who are just as untainted as he himself once was.
15th Apr '18 7:53:46 PM PaulA
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* NoDoubtTheYearsHaveChangedMe: Dantes does this type of reveal to each of his enemies.



* NouveauRiche: The villainous Danglars is described as a stereotypical Nouveau Riche, with an appearance as repellent as his personality. In contrast, the Count is himself Wicked Cultured despite having spent most of his life as a humble sailor and prisoner. It seems that the lowborn will only develop shallow tastes in response to riches if they're bad people to begin with.



* OfficerAndAGentleman: Despite being a rabble-rousing populist, General Nortier provides a good example of a gentleman soldier behaving honorably to those of the same class, even if on opposing sides. In the backstory, Franz d'Epinay's father, a Royalist, was caught infiltrating the group of pro-Napoleon soldiers Nortier belonged to and seeing that d'Epinay was a fellow gentleman, Nortier allowed him to duel to the death instead of simply killing him outright.



* OnceForYesTwiceForNo: Noirtier is completely paralyzed except for his eyes. He communicates by a system of blinks, including two agreed-upon signals meaning yes and no.



* PoisonedChaliceSwitcheroo: There is some in-story discussion of this trope as used by the Borgias. According to one of the men, the chalice contained a secret compartment that released the poison when the cupfiller needed, thus allowing him to serve an entire row of cardinals with only one in the middle one dying.
* PoisonIsEvil: The murder technique of choice of [[spoiler:Madame de Villefort, who poisons her husband's relatives one by one so her son will inherit everything]]. Its use by the Borgias is also mentioned.



* PrankDate: Albert is propositioned by a peasant girl at the Carnival in Rome, but it turns out to be a ploy to lure him into the clutches of bandits who hold him for ransom.
* PrematurelyGreyHaired: Danglars' hair turns white prematurely when the Count's vengeance catches up with him.



* ProtoSuperhero: Arguably, although perhaps more of a super''villain'' than hero at times.

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* ProtoSuperhero: Arguably, although perhaps more of a super''villain'' than hero at times. Like Batman, he's a brooding loner bent on revenge who is massively wealthy, a Master of Disguise, and has picked up immense physical prowess along the way.



* RageAgainstTheLegalSystem: Edmond's revenge includes the corrupt judge who had him incarcerated indefinitely despite knowing he was innocent.



* RelativeError: Mercedes is mistaken for her son's mistress. The fact that [[MommasBoy Albert]] just can't shut up about how perfect his mother is really doesn't help matters. The Count probably [[InvokedTrope made that mistake on purpose]] -- he didn't want to reveal to Albert that he knew Mercedes.

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* RelativeError: Mercedes is mistaken for her son's mistress. The fact that [[MommasBoy Albert]] just can't shut up about how perfect his mother is really doesn't help matters. The Count probably [[InvokedTrope made that mistake on purpose]] -- he didn't want to reveal to Albert that he knew Mercedes. Debray doesn't have the same excuse.



* RevengeByProxy: Monte-Cristo is perfectly willing to let Valentine get bumped off just to get his revenge on her father. Only when Morrel lets out his AnguishedDeclarationOfLove does the Count realize that he's not the omniscient BigGood he thought he was.

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* RevengeBeforeReason: Dantès finds himself free, talented, and ridiculously wealthy. It reaches the point where he's able to offer bribes to the pope, bankrupt a major French bank, construct multiple elaborate secret identities, buy up half of the French property market, and care for a beautiful foreign princess. He could sail off into the sunset, attempt to live out a long and happy life... But by this point he is a broken man obsessed with vengeance. [[spoiler:He eventually snaps out of it, but only when he sees the consequences of his actions.]]
* RevengeByProxy: Monte-Cristo is perfectly willing to let encompass the deaths of Albert and Valentine get bumped off just to get his revenge on her father. Only their fathers, in each case only relenting when Morrel lets out his AnguishedDeclarationOfLove he realizes their deaths will also harm people he cares about (Albert's mother Mercedes and [[spoiler:Valentine's secret fiance Maximilien]]). He does at least draw the line at harming Villefort's infant son, [[spoiler:and Edouard's death is a key moment leading to the Count realize realizing that he's not the omniscient BigGood he thought he was. was]].
* SacredHospitality:
** The Count, during the period when he's traveling and preparing his revenge, spends time in lands where this principle is upheld and absorbs it himself. One consequence is that he is noticeably unwilling to dine at Albert's home. While he gives other excuses, the explanation is that he feels it wouldn't be right to revenge himself on them if he shared their food. It's how Mercedes gets her first hint that the Count doesn't have her husband's best interests at heart, since he refuses food she herself gives him.
** Caderousse's MoralEventHorizon is murdering and robbing a wealthy stranger staying the night (at Caderousse's own insistence) in his house. Compounding the crime's seriousness is the fact that said stranger had actually travelled there to trade with him -- Caderousse is simply driven by Greed.
* ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney: Edmond Dantes, Determinator or not, wouldn't have gotten far into his elaborate schemes for revenge without his eleventy billion francs.



* SecretIdentityIdentity: Edmond Dantes was so changed by prison that as the Count, he doesn't look at all like the idealistic NiceGuy he used to be and has some ThatManIsDead toward his earlier self. Also odd is that Dantes creates other personas: Busoni, an intellectual and pious Italian priest who seems to be modeled after Faria who tutored him in prison, and Lord Wilmore, an eccentric British philanthropist who is an enemy of the Count. Thus, Dantes essentially divided the different parts of his personality into different identities, and his main identity as the Count represents his darker side. He ultimately ends up showing some kindness and mercy (after one of his revenges went too far), and at the end of the novel signs a friendly letter as "Edmond Dantes, Count of Monte Cristo", thus reconciling the identities.



* ShipperOnDeck: When the Count is [[spoiler:writing up his will before the duel]], he hopes that Morrel will marry Haydée, before learning Morrel already has his sights on someone ([[spoiler:had he known that someone was Valentine, the rest of the book would have been very different indeed.]]).

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* SexSlave: This is the Count's cover story for Haydee's presence. It also helps him to justify why a man of his standing isn't courting women.
* ShedTheFamilyName:
** Villefort, a Royalist, changed his name to disassociate himself from his Bonapartist father, Noirtier.
** [[spoiler:Albert de Morcerf]] does this after he finds out what a bastard his father was and his mother even suggests to him that he take her maiden name instead.
* ShipperOnDeck: When the Count is [[spoiler:writing up his will before the duel]], he hopes that Morrel will marry Haydée, before learning Morrel already has his sights on someone ([[spoiler:had he known that someone was Valentine, the rest of the book would have been very different indeed.]]).indeed]]).



* SmitingEvilFeelsGood: The Count feels satisfied by doing "God's will", as he puts it, and genuinely remorseful when he wrongfully judges (i.e, punishes) an innocent person. In one case, the absence of this satisfaction leads him to realize what he already knew subconsciously: [[spoiler:that Edouard did not deserve to be murdered]].



* StealingFromTheTill: The Count notes that his head servant has a salary of 1500 francs per year, and is making as much again by taking a cut out of the household expenditures that he is in control of.



* SwordCane: Noirtier carried one before he was paralyzed.

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* SwordCane: Noirtier carried one before he was paralyzed.paralyzed and was skilled enough with it to defeat a seasoned military officer armed with a full-sized rapier.
12th Apr '18 7:53:31 PM PaulA
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* BetterToDieThanBeKilled: Fernand shoots himself in the head, having had his treacherous past exposed.
* BewareTheNiceOnes: Edmond was a guy who had everything going for him, then lost everything thanks to being screwed over by whom he thought were his friends. What ensues is a gigantic Batman Gambit to take revenge on every last one of them and their families.



* BlackAndGrayMorality or EvilVersusEvil

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* BlackAndGrayMorality or EvilVersusEvilEvilVersusEvil: The Count is ruthless to the point of being a VillainProtagonist, but the people he's up against are even worse.



%%* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters

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%%* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters* LeonineContract: Luigi Vampa and his men take Danglars prisoner and deprive him of any food except for what he buys from them at astronomical prices. This was, of course, masterminded by the Count as a means of separating Danglars from his ill-gotten wealth.
* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters: The novel begins with a reasonable group of six or so...then fast-forwards twenty years to when each of them has his own distinct family and social circle. There are at least 38 named characters.



* MentorOccupationalHazard: Abbe Faria spends years tutoring his fellow prisoner Edmond Dantes, and planning an escape from prison. Then, just as their escape plan is coming to fruition, he dies. But not before telling Dantes how to find some long lost treasure.



* MinoredInAsskicking: Edmond Dantès. The greater part of the story involves him infiltrating the French aristocracy multiple times under different guises, and trapping his enemies in various plans. But he's also a hardened ex-con, seasoned buccaneer, and hellbent on revenge.



* MockMillionaire: As part of his scheme, the Count gets a disreputable old soldier and Benedetto, a career criminal, to pose as father and son and pretend to be wealthy Italian aristocrats.
* MoodWhiplash: The young women Eugenie and Louise are planning their escape from the French aristocracy. It's a tense, risk-filled scene...until Eugenie swears, and the two erupt in laughter.



* MorallyBankruptBanker: Danglars.

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* MorallyBankruptBanker: Danglars. Not only does he make stupid investments with his client's money, but when it catches up to him he runs for it with what's left of it.
* MosesInTheBulrushes: The villainous Benedetto ("blessing") is a subversion of this trope. He is the product of an adulterous affair and left for dead by his parents. He is raised by criminals, and is much worse than his adoptive family. If they manage to impart any values to him, it is an utter hatred of his birth father.



* TookALevelInBadass: Edmond Dantes becomes The Count of Monte Cristo and spends several years preparing to get revenge on his enemies. At one point, the narration asserts that Dantes' time spent languishing in a tiny cell has given him unusual strength.



* {{Tsundere}}: Eugénie Danglars is cold, aloof, and unfriendly to her family, her friends, her acquaintances, and her fiancé(s) and even telling her father that she loves no one and nothing except her studies of music and art. Yet the second she's alone with her vocal coach/friend/lover Louise d'Armilly, she's warm, playful, and affectionate, even calling Louise things like "my sweet" and gently teasing her for being unable to close an over-packed suitcase.



* WhamLine: "The sea is the cemetery of the Chateau d'If".

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* WhamLine: WellIntentionedExtremist: The Count himself is an anti-heroic example, and realizes it by the end of the book. Having escaped prison after many years of undeserved confinement, he devotes himself obsessively to taking revenge on those enemies who framed him and ruined his life. For most of the book, Edmond is able to ignore the fact that the grand machinations of his vengeance are heaping danger and grief on numerous innocent bystanders as well as the guilty.
* WhamLine:
**
"The sea is the cemetery of the Chateau d'If".
12th Apr '18 12:06:29 PM lalalei2001
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* ActionizedAdaptation: The original book has very few action scenes, with two duels interrupted before they can begin via apology or a BreakingSpeech. Most film adaptations add some sword fights anyway.
11th Apr '18 9:17:32 PM PaulA
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Added DiffLines:

* FaceOfAnAngelMindOfADemon: Benedetto has strawberry blond hair, and there's a comment in the text to the effect that he looked like an angel; unfortunately, that angel was Lucifer. He's an unrepententant criminal who has committed nearly every crime on the books before the age of 21.


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* FakeUltimateHero: Count de Morcerf is a respected public figure with a beautiful wife, military commission, vast fortune, and noble title -- each of which he earned by screwing someone else over.


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* FauxDeath: [[spoiler:Valentine's death by poisoning turns out to be a faux death arranged by the Count so she can escape the poisoner.]]
* {{Fauxreigner}}: The Count of Monte Cristo, who variously presents himself as English and Italian and hints at even more exotic origins, when actually he was born and raised in France like the other characters.
* {{Fiction 500}}: A scene in the novel shows the Count listing his assets, totaling an estimated value of 120 million francs, an impossibly huge figure by 1838 standards (as a comparison, Napoleon Bonaparte's personal wealth in 1814 was estimated at somewhere in the region of 80 million francs), and this is the near the end of the story, when he has already spent a large portion of his fortune. He is able to effectively "resurrect" a ship confirmed as lost at sea in a matter of weeks, is implied to control one of the most powerful banks in Europe, owns a fleet of ships, and singlehandedly toys with the French financial market specifically to screw a single person.


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* GentlemanAndAScholar: The novel opens with Edmond Dantes as a young, naive sailor; his transformation into the suave, educated, and urbane Count began with his meeting the Abbe Faria, who educates him and reveals to him the location of a great treasure. Edmond made the most of both.


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* HorribleJudgeOfCharacter: The young Edmond, trusting as friends the same men who will completely ruin his life and get him started on the quest for revenge that will occupy the rest of the story. In fact, he will never realize, by himself, the reason of his downfall: only with the help of old Faria will he be able to finally get a clue.


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* InnateNightVision: After spending more than ten years in a dimly-lit cell, the Count of Monte Cristo sees as well in the dark as in the light.
* InnOfNoReturn: Caderousse owns an inn of ill reputation. When he receives a diamond from the Count he immediately runs after a jeweler. The jeweler gives him money for the diamond, but has to spend a night in the inn due to bad weather. Caderousse, influenced by his greedy wife, decides to murder the jeweler, so he would have both the money and diamond. He succeeds, but in the ensuing fight his wife gets murdered and later Caderousse gets caught.
* InTheBlood: Benedetto is a bad guy because of the evil inclinations of his father, [[spoiler:Villefort]]. He is naturally educated and well-spoken, despite receiving little schooling, simply because his father is an aristocrat.


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* KickTheMoralityPet: Edmond attacks innocent people -- the family members of his enemies -- not because they've hurt him in any way, but just to make his true enemies' despair that much more absolute. It's only once one of his closest friends attempts suicide (because he, unbeknownst to Edmond, was in love with one of those innocents) that Edmond realizes how cruel he's become. Fortunately, there's still time to save ''most'' of his victims.


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* KissingCousins: Fernand and Mercedes are cousins who get married and have a son.
* KnightTemplarParent: Madame de Villefort will go to any lengths to ensure that her son inherits a large fortune; which includes [[spoiler:poisoning nearly every member of her family, including her step-daughter]].
11th Apr '18 8:21:10 PM PaulA
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* ExcuseBoomerang: Invoked, but not by the criminal. [[spoiler:Benedetto]] has cheerfully revealed that he's a thief, escaped convict and murderer, along with the fact that he was nearly BuriedAlive as a minutes-old infant by his father before being rescued and raised to adulthood, and that his father is [[spoiler:the public prosecutor]]. A cop comments on the situation saying that there'll be mitigating circumstances.
11th Apr '18 8:20:53 PM PaulA
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* DiesWideOpen: Abbe Faria dies like this after a seizure and Edmond has a lot of trouble closing his eyes.



** When Edmond is in disguise, none of his old friends or enemies knows his true identity.[[spoiler: Except for Mercedes, who pegged it was him when she first heard his voice, at least when he was Monte Cristo.]].

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** When Edmond is in disguise, none of his old friends or enemies knows his true identity.[[spoiler: Except [[spoiler:Except for Mercedes, who pegged it was him when she first heard his voice, at least when he was Monte Cristo.]].


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* DrivenByEnvy: Danglars gets in on the plot to frame Edmond because he's envious of Edmond's success, and particularly because Edmond has recently been promoted into a position Danglars had been angling for himself.


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* DrugsAreGood: The Count talks about the delights of hashish, and claims he uses it to sleep at will.


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* EatTheDog: Maximillien Morrel rescued Chateau-Renault during combat in North Africa, and as the two ended up in the desert without rations, they were forced to kill and eat one of their horses. Played for laughs when they recount the incident to their friends, there's a comment about it being tough (i.e. a difficult thing to do), which one of the friends jokingly interprets as a reference to the horse meat being tough.
11th Apr '18 4:53:02 AM Storygirl000
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Often regarded as the greatest revenge story of all time, this novel remains a popular classic. It has inspired [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Count_of_Monte_Cristo#Film_and_television at least 40 film and television adaptations]], [[Series/TheCountOfMonteCristo1964 including the 1964 12 part series from BBC]], the {{anime}} ''Anime/{{Gankutsuou}}'' ([[AC:[[RecycledInSpace in space]]]]!), [[WesternAnimation/TheCountOfMonteCristo1997 a 1997 animated adaption]] and an episode of ''[[WesternAnimation/MrMagoo The Famous Adventures of Mr. Magoo]]''. It also inspired Alfred Bester's classic SF novel ''Literature/TheStarsMyDestination'' (also [[AC:[[RecycledInSpace in space]]]]!) and Creator/StephenFry's ''The Stars' Tennis Balls'' (aka ''Revenge: A Novel'') which has a lot of fun with {{Significant Anagram}}s. The TV show ''{{Series/Revenge}}'' is basically ''The Count of Monte Cristo'' [[RecycledInSpace in the Hamptons]]. A literary mash-up came out in 2014 called ''Literature/TheVampireCountOfMonteCristo'' which is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin.

to:

Often regarded as the greatest revenge story of all time, this novel remains a popular classic. It has inspired [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Count_of_Monte_Cristo#Film_and_television at least 40 film and television adaptations]], [[Series/TheCountOfMonteCristo1964 including the 1964 12 part series from BBC]], the {{anime}} ''Anime/{{Gankutsuou}}'' ([[AC:[[RecycledInSpace in space]]]]!), [[WesternAnimation/TheCountOfMonteCristo1997 a 1997 animated adaption]] and an episode of ''[[WesternAnimation/MrMagoo The Famous Adventures of Mr. Magoo]]''. It also inspired Alfred Bester's classic SF novel ''Literature/TheStarsMyDestination'' (also [[AC:[[RecycledInSpace in space]]]]!) and Creator/StephenFry's ''The Stars' Tennis Balls'' (aka ''Revenge: A Novel'') which has a lot of fun with {{Significant Anagram}}s. The TV show ''{{Series/Revenge}}'' is basically ''The Count of Monte Cristo'' [[RecycledInSpace in the Hamptons]]. A literary mash-up came out in 2014 called ''Literature/TheVampireCountOfMonteCristo'' which is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin.
ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. A [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Count_of_Monte_Cristo_(musical) musical]], adapting elements of both the book and the 2002 film, began its run in 2009.
11th Apr '18 12:43:34 AM Mareon
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Often regarded as the greatest revenge story of all time, this novel remains a popular classic. It has inspired [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Count_of_Monte_Cristo#Film_and_television at least 40 film and television adaptations]], [[Series/TheCountOfMonteCristo1964 including the´12 part series from BBC]], the {{anime}} ''Anime/{{Gankutsuou}}'' ([[AC:[[RecycledInSpace in space]]]]!), [[WesternAnimation/TheCountOfMonteCristo1997 a 1997 animated adaption]] and an episode of ''[[WesternAnimation/MrMagoo The Famous Adventures of Mr. Magoo]]''. It also inspired Alfred Bester's classic SF novel ''Literature/TheStarsMyDestination'' (also [[AC:[[RecycledInSpace in space]]]]!) and Creator/StephenFry's ''The Stars' Tennis Balls'' (aka ''Revenge: A Novel'') which has a lot of fun with {{Significant Anagram}}s. The TV show ''{{Series/Revenge}}'' is basically ''The Count of Monte Cristo'' [[RecycledInSpace in the Hamptons]]. A literary mash-up came out in 2014 called ''Literature/TheVampireCountOfMonteCristo'' which is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin.

to:

Often regarded as the greatest revenge story of all time, this novel remains a popular classic. It has inspired [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Count_of_Monte_Cristo#Film_and_television at least 40 film and television adaptations]], [[Series/TheCountOfMonteCristo1964 including the´12 the 1964 12 part series from BBC]], the {{anime}} ''Anime/{{Gankutsuou}}'' ([[AC:[[RecycledInSpace in space]]]]!), [[WesternAnimation/TheCountOfMonteCristo1997 a 1997 animated adaption]] and an episode of ''[[WesternAnimation/MrMagoo The Famous Adventures of Mr. Magoo]]''. It also inspired Alfred Bester's classic SF novel ''Literature/TheStarsMyDestination'' (also [[AC:[[RecycledInSpace in space]]]]!) and Creator/StephenFry's ''The Stars' Tennis Balls'' (aka ''Revenge: A Novel'') which has a lot of fun with {{Significant Anagram}}s. The TV show ''{{Series/Revenge}}'' is basically ''The Count of Monte Cristo'' [[RecycledInSpace in the Hamptons]]. A literary mash-up came out in 2014 called ''Literature/TheVampireCountOfMonteCristo'' which is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin.
11th Apr '18 12:41:28 AM Mareon
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Often regarded as the greatest revenge story of all time, this novel remains a popular classic. It has inspired [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Count_of_Monte_Cristo#Film_and_television at least 40 film and television adaptations]], including the {{anime}} ''Anime/{{Gankutsuou}}'' ([[AC:[[RecycledInSpace in space]]]]!), [[WesternAnimation/TheCountOfMonteCristo1997 a 1997 animated adaption]] and an episode of ''[[WesternAnimation/MrMagoo The Famous Adventures of Mr. Magoo]]''. It also inspired Alfred Bester's classic SF novel ''Literature/TheStarsMyDestination'' (also [[AC:[[RecycledInSpace in space]]]]!) and Creator/StephenFry's ''The Stars' Tennis Balls'' (aka ''Revenge: A Novel'') which has a lot of fun with {{Significant Anagram}}s. The TV show ''{{Series/Revenge}}'' is basically ''The Count of Monte Cristo'' [[RecycledInSpace in the Hamptons]]. A literary mash-up came out in 2014 called ''Literature/TheVampireCountOfMonteCristo'' which is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin.

to:

Often regarded as the greatest revenge story of all time, this novel remains a popular classic. It has inspired [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Count_of_Monte_Cristo#Film_and_television at least 40 film and television adaptations]], [[Series/TheCountOfMonteCristo1964 including the´12 part series from BBC]], the {{anime}} ''Anime/{{Gankutsuou}}'' ([[AC:[[RecycledInSpace in space]]]]!), [[WesternAnimation/TheCountOfMonteCristo1997 a 1997 animated adaption]] and an episode of ''[[WesternAnimation/MrMagoo The Famous Adventures of Mr. Magoo]]''. It also inspired Alfred Bester's classic SF novel ''Literature/TheStarsMyDestination'' (also [[AC:[[RecycledInSpace in space]]]]!) and Creator/StephenFry's ''The Stars' Tennis Balls'' (aka ''Revenge: A Novel'') which has a lot of fun with {{Significant Anagram}}s. The TV show ''{{Series/Revenge}}'' is basically ''The Count of Monte Cristo'' [[RecycledInSpace in the Hamptons]]. A literary mash-up came out in 2014 called ''Literature/TheVampireCountOfMonteCristo'' which is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin.
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