History Literature / TheColdEquations

7th Sep '17 8:44:12 PM marcoasalazarm
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* GeniusThriller: Played with. Barton does everything he can to try to figure out how to save Marilyn with the resources he has on hand, but unfortunately the science facts are completely against him.
4th Sep '17 8:31:32 AM JackG
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* ScienceHero: Also a deliberate aversion -- no-one pulls a technological AssPull to save the girl.

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* ScienceHero: Also a A deliberate aversion -- no-one pulls a technological AssPull to save the girl.
11th May '17 12:33:52 PM ChaoticNovelist
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* NoOSHACompliance: While the Rocket Equation does limit the amount of fuel to be used in the shuttle, the idea that a futuristic space shuttle would have fewer fail-safes or backups than a 20th century airplane (modern aircraft are always given a large enough fuel supply that, even if there's a delay due to weather or problems at the landing site, they can typically circle the runway for several minutes, or possibly even hours, regardless of the distance of the trip) is more than a little strange. Either the OSHA does not exist in the future, or someone decided that a shuttle that can literally hold only one person and a small amount of cargo, and just barely enough fuel to get them from point A to point B, is a good idea, something that in the 20th and 21st century would never leave the design phase.
** It's mentioned that the pod ''did'' have some extra fuel, which is why there was a certain amount of time before the girl had to be spaced. The extra fuel that would be used to maneuver if there were a storm at his destination or some other complication, was instead used to prolong the time before deceleration would start, the amount of time Marilyn had to live. The computations for the change were made on the main ship's computers and relayed back to the EDS with a combination of disapproval and understanding on their end.
** It's also mentioned that the flight in question is an emergency flight being conducted at the absolute outer limit of the spacecraft's fuel range, with very little margin for error. Of course this still doesn't excuse the total lack of a preflight inspection (as even the most cursory one would still have found the girl before takeoff), so OSHA still has lots of citations to hand out here.

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* NoOSHACompliance: NoOSHACompliance:
**
While the Rocket Equation does limit the amount of fuel to be used in the shuttle, the idea that a futuristic space shuttle would have fewer fail-safes or backups than a 20th century airplane (modern aircraft are always given a large enough fuel supply that, even if there's a delay due to weather or problems at the landing site, they can typically circle the runway for several minutes, or possibly even hours, regardless of the distance of the trip) is more than a little strange. Either the OSHA does not exist in the future, or someone decided that a shuttle that can literally hold only one person and a small amount of cargo, and just barely enough fuel to get them from point A to point B, is a good idea, something that in the 20th and 21st century would never leave the design phase. \n** [[note]] It's mentioned that the pod ''did'' have some extra had a ''little'' fuel, which is why there was a certain amount of time before the girl had to be spaced. The extra fuel that would be used to maneuver if there were a storm at his destination or some other complication, was instead used to prolong the time before deceleration would start, the amount of time Marilyn had to live. The computations for the change were made on the main ship's computers and relayed back to the EDS with a combination of disapproval and understanding on their end.
end [[/note]].
** It's also mentioned that the flight in question is an emergency flight being conducted at the absolute outer limit of the spacecraft's fuel range, with very little margin for error. Of course course, this still doesn't excuse the total lack of a preflight inspection (as even the most cursory one would still have found the girl before takeoff), so OSHA still has lots of citations to hand out here.



* TakeAThirdOption: The fact that there isn't one is the entire point. The story was originally [[http://zoo.nightstar.net/viewtopic.php?p=335078#p335078 a much-needed subversion]] of early [[TheFifties 1950s]] ScienceFiction and its omnipotent men of ''SCIENCE!''.
* ThrownOutTheAirlock: The only option in the end.

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* TakeAThirdOption: The fact that there isn't one is the entire point. The story was originally [[http://zoo.nightstar.net/viewtopic.php?p=335078#p335078 a much-needed subversion]] of early [[TheFifties 1950s]] ScienceFiction and its omnipotent men of ''SCIENCE!''.
* ThrownOutTheAirlock: The only option in the end.end is to space Marilyn.
29th Mar '17 11:02:06 PM CritterKeeper
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** It's mentioned that the pod ''did'' have some extra fuel, which is why there was a certain amount of time before the girl had to be spaced.
** It's also mentioned that the flight in question is an emergency flight being conducted at the absolute outer limit of the spacecraft's fuel range, with very little margin for error. Of course this still doesn't excuse the total lack of a preflight inspection (as even the most cursory one would still have found the girl before takeoff), so OSHA still has lots of citations to hand out here.
** Indeed if the mission was done with absolutely no margin for error the lack of such a check is insane since there are countless tiny things that might go wrong. Disaster for such ships seems unavoidable, stowaways or not. Barton expect that Marilyn's presence s will cause him to run out of fuel a thousand feet from the ground which means that the rocket is expected to run out of fuel essentially at the instant it touches down. Its difficult to imagine a scenario where the rocket doesn't crash. Even a moderate headwind while landing would result in the rocket running out of fuel before landing.

to:

** It's mentioned that the pod ''did'' have some extra fuel, which is why there was a certain amount of time before the girl had to be spaced.
spaced. The extra fuel that would be used to maneuver if there were a storm at his destination or some other complication, was instead used to prolong the time before deceleration would start, the amount of time Marilyn had to live. The computations for the change were made on the main ship's computers and relayed back to the EDS with a combination of disapproval and understanding on their end.
** It's also mentioned that the flight in question is an emergency flight being conducted at the absolute outer limit of the spacecraft's fuel range, with very little margin for error. Of course this still doesn't excuse the total lack of a preflight inspection (as even the most cursory one would still have found the girl before takeoff), so OSHA still has lots of citations to hand out here. \n** Indeed if the mission was done with absolutely no margin for error the lack of such a check is insane since there are countless tiny things that might go wrong. Disaster for such ships seems unavoidable, stowaways or not. Barton expect that Marilyn's presence s will cause him to run out of fuel a thousand feet from the ground which means that the rocket is expected to run out of fuel essentially at the instant it touches down. Its difficult to imagine a scenario where the rocket doesn't crash. Even a moderate headwind while landing would result in the rocket running out of fuel before landing.
24th Jan '17 8:01:44 AM PsychoGecko
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** At the same time, real life disasters such as the one that befell the Challenger show that such measures [[RealityIsUnrealistic are taken all the time.]] In that case, the Challenger's design flaw had been known about, but ignored because it had never caused a problem to the mission before.

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** At the same time, real life disasters such as the one that befell the Challenger show that such measures [[RealityIsUnrealistic are taken all the time.]] In that case, the Challenger's design flaw had been known about, but ignored because it had never caused a problem to the mission before. There is a reason why [[NoOSHACompliance this trope]] has a RealLife section on its page.
24th Jan '17 8:00:32 AM PsychoGecko
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** At the same time, real life disasters such as the one that befell the Challenger show that such measures [RealityIsUnrealistic are taken all the time.] In that case, the Challenger's design flaw had been known about, but ignored because it had never caused a problem to the mission before.

to:

** At the same time, real life disasters such as the one that befell the Challenger show that such measures [RealityIsUnrealistic [[RealityIsUnrealistic are taken all the time.] ]] In that case, the Challenger's design flaw had been known about, but ignored because it had never caused a problem to the mission before.
24th Jan '17 8:00:13 AM PsychoGecko
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Added DiffLines:

** At the same time, real life disasters such as the one that befell the Challenger show that such measures [RealityIsUnrealistic are taken all the time.] In that case, the Challenger's design flaw had been known about, but ignored because it had never caused a problem to the mission before.
5th Oct '16 9:34:36 PM Game_Fan
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Added DiffLines:

** Indeed if the mission was done with absolutely no margin for error the lack of such a check is insane since there are countless tiny things that might go wrong. Disaster for such ships seems unavoidable, stowaways or not. Barton expect that Marilyn's presence s will cause him to run out of fuel a thousand feet from the ground which means that the rocket is expected to run out of fuel essentially at the instant it touches down. Its difficult to imagine a scenario where the rocket doesn't crash. Even a moderate headwind while landing would result in the rocket running out of fuel before landing.
18th Aug '16 3:26:23 PM Tre
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"The Cold Equations" is a short story by Tom Godwin, first published in ''Astounding'' in 1954, which has been done as a radio play for the ''Radio/XMinusOne'' radio drama of the 1950s, an episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone1985'', and a 1996 made-for-TV movie for the SciFiChannel.

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"The Cold Equations" is a short story by Tom Godwin, first published in ''Astounding'' in 1954, which has been done as a radio play for the ''Radio/XMinusOne'' radio drama of the 1950s, an episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone1985'', and a 1996 made-for-TV movie for the SciFiChannel.
[[Creator/{{Syfy}} Sci Fi Channel]].
22nd Jul '15 1:27:19 PM MarkLungo
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"The Cold Equations" is a short story by Tom Godwin, first published in ''Astounding'' in 1954, which has been done as a radio play for the ''Radio/XMinusOne'' radio drama of the 1950s, a 1988 episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone'', and a 1996 made-for-TV movie for the SciFiChannel.

to:

"The Cold Equations" is a short story by Tom Godwin, first published in ''Astounding'' in 1954, which has been done as a radio play for the ''Radio/XMinusOne'' radio drama of the 1950s, a 1988 an episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone'', ''Series/TheTwilightZone1985'', and a 1996 made-for-TV movie for the SciFiChannel.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheColdEquations