History Literature / TheColdEquations

5th Oct '16 9:34:36 PM Game_Fan
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Added DiffLines:

** Indeed if the mission was done with absolutely no margin for error the lack of such a check is insane since there are countless tiny things that might go wrong. Disaster for such ships seems unavoidable, stowaways or not. Barton expect that Marilyn's presence s will cause him to run out of fuel a thousand feet from the ground which means that the rocket is expected to run out of fuel essentially at the instant it touches down. Its difficult to imagine a scenario where the rocket doesn't crash. Even a moderate headwind while landing would result in the rocket running out of fuel before landing.
18th Aug '16 3:26:23 PM Tre
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"The Cold Equations" is a short story by Tom Godwin, first published in ''Astounding'' in 1954, which has been done as a radio play for the ''Radio/XMinusOne'' radio drama of the 1950s, an episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone1985'', and a 1996 made-for-TV movie for the SciFiChannel.

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"The Cold Equations" is a short story by Tom Godwin, first published in ''Astounding'' in 1954, which has been done as a radio play for the ''Radio/XMinusOne'' radio drama of the 1950s, an episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone1985'', and a 1996 made-for-TV movie for the SciFiChannel.
[[Creator/{{Syfy}} Sci Fi Channel]].
22nd Jul '15 1:27:19 PM MarkLungo
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"The Cold Equations" is a short story by Tom Godwin, first published in ''Astounding'' in 1954, which has been done as a radio play for the ''Radio/XMinusOne'' radio drama of the 1950s, a 1988 episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone'', and a 1996 made-for-TV movie for the SciFiChannel.

to:

"The Cold Equations" is a short story by Tom Godwin, first published in ''Astounding'' in 1954, which has been done as a radio play for the ''Radio/XMinusOne'' radio drama of the 1950s, a 1988 an episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone'', ''Series/TheTwilightZone1985'', and a 1996 made-for-TV movie for the SciFiChannel.
20th Nov '14 7:17:18 AM zarpaulus
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%%* IDidWhatIHadToDo

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%%* IDidWhatIHadToDo* IDidWhatIHadToDo: Throw the girl out the airlock to get the vaccines to the colony.



%%* ThrownOutTheAirlock

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%%* ThrownOutTheAirlock* ThrownOutTheAirlock: The only option in the end.
20th Nov '14 6:42:25 AM muddycurve424
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* ExecutiveVeto: ''Astounding'' editor ''John W. Campbell himself'' refused to publish the story until the author wrote an ending in which the girl died.



* [[ScienceMarchesOn Science]] / TechnologyMarchesOn: Today we'd simply build an ummanned robotic ship with no life support; you could probably afford to send three ships, just for redundancy.
20th Nov '14 5:57:35 AM muddycurve424
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%%No Zero Context Examples allowed. Please flesh out the examples before uncommenting them.



* IDidWhatIHadToDo

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* %%* IDidWhatIHadToDo



* ThrownOutTheAirlock

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* %%* ThrownOutTheAirlock
20th Nov '14 5:57:35 AM muddycurve424
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18th Sep '14 3:30:32 PM cliffc999
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* NoOSHACompliance: While the Rocket Equation does limit the amount of fuel to be used in the shuttle, the idea that a futuristic space shuttle would have fewer fail-safes or backups than a 20th century airplane (modern aircraft are always given a large enough fuel supply that, even if there's a delay due to weather or problems at the landing site, they can typically circle the runway for several minutes, or possibly even hours, regardless of the distance of the trip) is more than a little strange. Either the OSHA does not exist in the future, or someone decided that a shuttle that can literally hold only one person and a small amount of cargo, and just barely enough fuel to get them from point A to point B, is a good idea, something that in the 20th and 21st century would never leave the design phase.

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* NoOSHACompliance: While the Rocket Equation does limit the amount of fuel to be used in the shuttle, the idea that a futuristic space shuttle would have fewer fail-safes or backups than a 20th century airplane (modern aircraft are always given a large enough fuel supply that, even if there's a delay due to weather or problems at the landing site, they can typically circle the runway for several minutes, or possibly even hours, regardless of the distance of the trip) is more than a little strange. Either the OSHA does not exist in the future, or someone decided that a shuttle that can literally hold only one person and a small amount of cargo, and just barely enough fuel to get them from point A to point B, is a good idea, something that in the 20th and 21st century would never leave the design phase.


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** It's also mentioned that the flight in question is an emergency flight being conducted at the absolute outer limit of the spacecraft's fuel range, with very little margin for error. Of course this still doesn't excuse the total lack of a preflight inspection (as even the most cursory one would still have found the girl before takeoff), so OSHA still has lots of citations to hand out here.
24th Mar '14 7:15:34 PM ReaderAt2046
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** It's mentioned that the pod ''did'' have some extra fuel, which is why there was a certain amount of time before the girl had to be spaced.
3rd Dec '13 7:01:33 PM Aquillion
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* ExecutiveVeto: Ironically, it was ''Astounding'' editor ''John W. Campbell himself'', who refused to publish the story until the author wrote an ending in which the girl died.

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* ExecutiveVeto: Ironically, it was ''Astounding'' editor ''John W. Campbell himself'', who himself'' refused to publish the story until the author wrote an ending in which the girl died.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheColdEquations