History Literature / TheCatcherInTheRye

4th Dec '17 10:36:13 AM Pichu-kun
Is there an issue? Send a Message


!!This novel contains examples of:

to:

!!This novel !!''The Catcher in the Rye'' contains examples of:



* AuthorAvatar: Holden. J.D. Salinger stated that he would have allowed a stage adaptation of the work on the condition that he be allowed to play Holden, [[DawsonCasting despite being significantly older than Holden]] by the time this was a possibility.
** Although this may have been simply because Salinger didn't want a stage play made at all, as he implied he would allow a film adaptation to happen only upon his death, partly to provide for his children, and partly so he wouldn't have to see it. In his later novella "Seymour: An Introduction," narrator Buddy Glass implies authorship of ''Catcher'' and emphatically denies Holden is based on Buddy's elder brother Seymour. Both Seymour and Buddy have been suggested as the more likely AuthorAvatar of Salinger himself.

to:

* AuthorAvatar: Holden. J.D. Salinger stated that he would have allowed a stage adaptation of the work on the condition that he be allowed to play Holden, [[DawsonCasting despite being significantly older than Holden]] by the time this was a possibility.
**
possibility. Although this may have been simply because Salinger didn't want a stage play made at all, as he implied he would allow a film adaptation to happen only upon his death, partly to provide for his children, and partly so he wouldn't have to see it. In his later novella "Seymour: An Introduction," narrator Buddy Glass implies authorship of ''Catcher'' and emphatically denies Holden is based on Buddy's elder brother Seymour. Both Seymour and Buddy have been suggested as the more likely AuthorAvatar of Salinger himself.



%%* BigApplesauce
%%* BigBrotherInstinct

to:

%%* BigApplesauce
%%* BigBrotherInstinct
* BigApplesauce: The book mainly takes place in 1940s Manhattan.
* BigBrotherInstinct: Holden is a pessimistic boy but he cares for his little sister a lot and feels the need to protect her.



* TheForties: Despite being published in the early [[TheFifties fifties]], it's obvious the novel is set in this decade. TV is never mentioned, [[{{Newsreel}} newsreels]] are still a thing, and everyone knows who Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne are.
** More specifically, the Lunt-Fontanne play that Holden and Sally go to see (''I Know My Love'') places the story in December of 1949.

to:

* TheForties: Despite being published in the early [[TheFifties fifties]], it's obvious the novel is set in this decade. TV is never mentioned, [[{{Newsreel}} newsreels]] are still a thing, and everyone knows who Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne are.
**
are. More specifically, the Lunt-Fontanne play that Holden and Sally go to see (''I Know My Love'') places the story in December of 1949.



* HypocrisyNod

to:

* HypocrisyNodHypocrisyNod:



* MisaimedFandom: [[InvokedTrope Invoked]]. Holden does this with the song "Comin' Thru the Rye". It's actually about two lovers meeting in a field. Holden adopts it as an image of himself protecting children from their own inevitable maturity (especially sex) and phoniness (like, say, lying about where you're going and screwing some guy in a field instead). He [[{{Mondegreen}} mishears it]], after all.
** Interestingly, the word ‘rye’ might actually refer to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_Garnock#Rye_Water Rye Water]] in Scotland. The poem then discusses a girl named Jenny who lets her petticoat down and get wet instead of holding it up while crossing it, so she can push away the boys who would run by to kiss the girls who would hold their petticoats on one hand and whatever they were carrying on the other instead, leaving no free hand to ward off the boys. Holden decided to interpret the word ‘rye’ [[IThoughtItMeant as actual rye]], which is the more ‘adult’ version, but misinterprets the meaning of the poem as talking about kids playing in a rye field.

to:

* MisaimedFandom: [[InvokedTrope Invoked]]. Holden does this with the song "Comin' Thru the Rye". It's actually about two lovers meeting in a field. Holden adopts it as an image of himself protecting children from their own inevitable maturity (especially sex) and phoniness (like, say, lying about where you're going and screwing some guy in a field instead). He [[{{Mondegreen}} mishears it]], after all.
**
all. Interestingly, the word ‘rye’ might actually refer to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_Garnock#Rye_Water Rye Water]] in Scotland. The poem then discusses a girl named Jenny who lets her petticoat down and get wet instead of holding it up while crossing it, so she can push away the boys who would run by to kiss the girls who would hold their petticoats on one hand and whatever they were carrying on the other instead, leaving no free hand to ward off the boys. Holden decided to interpret the word ‘rye’ [[IThoughtItMeant as actual rye]], which is the more ‘adult’ version, but misinterprets the meaning of the poem as talking about kids playing in a rye field.



* RuleOfSymbolism: Holden's little sister, who to him is the epitome of what he's trying to protect, is named Phoebe. This is an epithet of [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Artemis]], who is occasionally associated with the moon; in its male form, "Phoebus", it is also an epithet her twin brother Apollo, who is associated with the sun. The prostitute Holden hires, who is one of the apexes of the things Holden ''hates'', is named Sunny.
** Artemis is also the goddess of maidenhood and innocence. On the other hand, Apollo, god of the sun, was known for having many affairs with women, like most Greek gods.
*** That's far from the only example; the novel contains symbolism in spades, as Salinger was a master of the technique (as shown in his expertly-crafted short stories, e.g., ''A Perfect Day For Bananafish''.) It's most apparent in the penultimate chapter; the scene with Phoebe on the carousel is a cornucopia of symbolism. The Gold Ring that Phoebe tries to catch is widely interpreted as a metaphor for adulthood, with Holden's comment that "it's bad if you say anything to them" when children fall off the horse while attempting to reach it, is seen as an indicator he's ready to accept the inevitability of growing up.
*** Similarly, there is the museum. Holden points out how the museum's displays are in an infinite frozen state: while he changes with time, the displays stay the same. This symbolizes Holden's wish of having the world be forever frozen in the same state in order for him to avoid conflict and growing up.

to:

* RuleOfSymbolism: RuleOfSymbolism:
**
Holden's little sister, who to him is the epitome of what he's trying to protect, is named Phoebe. This is an epithet of [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Artemis]], who is occasionally associated with the moon; in its male form, "Phoebus", it is also an epithet her twin brother Apollo, who is associated with the sun. The prostitute Holden hires, who is one of the apexes of the things Holden ''hates'', is named Sunny. \n** Artemis is also the goddess of maidenhood and innocence. On the other hand, Apollo, god of the sun, was known for having many affairs with women, like most Greek gods.
*** ** That's far from the only example; the novel contains symbolism in spades, as Salinger was a master of the technique (as shown in his expertly-crafted short stories, e.g., ''A Perfect Day For Bananafish''.) It's most apparent in the penultimate chapter; the scene with Phoebe on the carousel is a cornucopia of symbolism. The Gold Ring that Phoebe tries to catch is widely interpreted as a metaphor for adulthood, with Holden's comment that "it's bad if you say anything to them" when children fall off the horse while attempting to reach it, is seen as an indicator he's ready to accept the inevitability of growing up.
*** ** Similarly, there is the museum. Holden points out how the museum's displays are in an infinite frozen state: while he changes with time, the displays stay the same. This symbolizes Holden's wish of having the world be forever frozen in the same state in order for him to avoid conflict and growing up.



* WhamLine: The first time Holden speaks at length about his brother Allie, he talks tenderly about how his little brother loved baseball and had a favorite catcher's mitt that he always used when playing. Then he finishes the paragraph with this:

to:

* WhamLine: WhamLine:
**
The first time Holden speaks at length about his brother Allie, he talks tenderly about how his little brother loved baseball and had a favorite catcher's mitt that he always used when playing. Then he finishes the paragraph with this:



* YoungerThanTheyLook: 17-year-old Holden Caulfield is 6'2" and has gray hairs. As such, [[InformedAbility he claims]] he can easily pass as an adult. But he's more often called out on being a minor than he is successfully able to pass.
** Sunny, for example, not only wouldn't believe he was 22, but may have also compared him to 13-year-old Freddie Bartholomew from the 1937 movie ''Captains Courageous''.

to:

* YoungerThanTheyLook: 17-year-old Holden Caulfield is 6'2" and has gray hairs. As such, [[InformedAbility he claims]] he can easily pass as an adult. But he's more often called out on being a minor than he is successfully able to pass. \n** Sunny, for example, not only wouldn't believe he was 22, but may have also compared him to 13-year-old Freddie Bartholomew from the 1937 movie ''Captains Courageous''.
2nd Sep '17 4:36:55 AM XFllo
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* MinimalistCast: While several characters are mentioned, only a handful besides Holden himself actually appear, and when they do their screentime is limited.



** One could argue it's not movies that Holden hates per se, it's (of course) the phoniness of Hollywood, particularly how he perceives his older brother D.B. as selling out, abandoning his more original, more creative work in favor of the more [[MoneyDearBoy lucrative business]] of writing screenplays.



* OmegaCast: While several characters are mentioned, only a handful besides Holden himself actually appear, and when they do their screentime is limited.
8th Aug '17 12:52:40 PM fruitstripegum
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* SillyRabbitCynicismIsForLosers: Both Mr. Antolini and Phoebe try to get across to Holden that much of his unhappiness is self-inflicted, and just as [[ItsAllAboutMe narcissistic]] as all the "phonies" he rails against.



* SillyRabbitCynicismIsForLosers: Both Mr. Antolini and Phoebe try to get across to Holden that much of his unhappiness is self-inflicted, and just as [[ItsAllAboutMe narcissistic]] as all the "phonies" he rails against.
* TheSnarkKnight: Holden, possibly.


Added DiffLines:

* TheSnarkKnight: Holden, possibly.
8th Aug '17 12:52:03 PM fruitstripegum
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{Newsreel}}: Holden sees one at a movie theater whilst holding hands with Jane.


Added DiffLines:

* {{Newsreel}}: Holden sees one at a movie theater whilst holding hands with Jane.
8th Aug '17 12:51:15 PM fruitstripegum
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* IconicOutfit: Holden's signature red hunting hat (pictured above). If you were to look up the hat online, you are bound to find at least one picture of Holden wearing it.



* IconicOutfit: Holden's signature red hunting hat (pictured above). If you were to look up the hat online, you are bound to find at least one picture of Holden wearing it.
8th Aug '17 12:50:45 PM fruitstripegum
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TheEeyore: Phoebe challenges Holden to name one thing that he genuinely likes. Holden claims he can't concentrate enough to answer her question.



* TheEeyore: Phoebe challenges Holden to name one thing that he genuinely likes. Holden claims he can't concentrate enough to answer her question.
21st Jul '17 8:52:44 AM isolato
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* VinylShatters: Holden accidentally shatters a record he was going to give to his sister Phoebe. It was almost definitely a shellac 78, which are known to shatter.

to:

* VinylShatters: Holden accidentally shatters a record he was going to give to his sister Phoebe. It [[JustifiedTrope Justified here]] - it was almost definitely a shellac 78, which are ''are'' known to shatter.
16th Mar '17 3:44:43 PM VoxAquila
Is there an issue? Send a Message
16th Mar '17 3:34:29 PM VoxAquila
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* IJustWantToHaveFriends: Virtually everything Holden does in the novel stems from how ''desperately'' lonely he is.


Added DiffLines:

* LovingAShadow: Despite how much Holden wants to reconnect with Jane, he can't ever bring himself to call her; he's too afraid she won't be the same person anymore.
14th Feb '17 10:22:17 PM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/selindjer_nad_propastyu_vo_rji.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350: A rare illustrated cover, from the first UK edition.]]

to:

[[quoteright:350:http://static.[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/selindjer_nad_propastyu_vo_rji.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350: [[caption-width-right:300: A rare illustrated cover, from the first UK edition.]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 150. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheCatcherInTheRye