History Literature / TheCanterburyTales

12th Dec '15 1:28:23 PM MarkLungo
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* ToiletHumour: Used extensively in the Miller's tale

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* ToiletHumour: Used extensively in the Miller's taletale.
* TooImportantToWalk: Chaucer [[PlayingWithATrope plays with this trope]] through the SmallNameBigEgo version of Chanticleer the rooster from "The Tale of the Nun's Priest":
-->"He looked as it were a grim lion,\\
And on his toes he roamed up and down;\\
He deigned not to set his feet to ground..."
30th Jul '15 6:42:13 PM Anorgil
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* YourCheatingHeart: Alison in "The Miller's Tale." Discussed and ultimately averted by the old lady in "The Wife of Bath's Tale" as well.
30th Jul '15 6:39:40 PM Anorgil
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* TakeAThirdOption: At the end of the Wife of Bath's Tale, when his bride offers him a choice that she can be either beautiful but unfaithful or ugly and faithful, the knight takes a third option by letting ''her'' decide. Her decision, too, was none of the above: to be both beautiful and faithful.

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* TakeAThirdOption: At the end of the "The Wife of Bath's Tale, Tale", when his bride offers him a choice that she can be either beautiful but unfaithful or ugly and faithful, the knight takes a third option by letting ''her'' decide. Her decision, too, was none of the above: to be both beautiful and faithful.


Added DiffLines:

** Gender-flipped in "The Wife of Bath's Tale."
30th Jul '15 6:36:46 PM Anorgil
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Added DiffLines:

* TakeAThirdOption: At the end of the Wife of Bath's Tale, when his bride offers him a choice that she can be either beautiful but unfaithful or ugly and faithful, the knight takes a third option by letting ''her'' decide. Her decision, too, was none of the above: to be both beautiful and faithful.
25th Jun '15 6:26:26 PM nombretomado
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* TheJoyOfX: It's the origin of "The X's Tale" formula. The problem is that most references miss the "told by an X" instead of "about an" meaning of the original. For example, the film ''AKnightsTale'', is set in Medieval Europe.

to:

* TheJoyOfX: It's the origin of "The X's Tale" formula. The problem is that most references miss the "told by an X" instead of "about an" meaning of the original. For example, the film ''AKnightsTale'', ''Film/AKnightsTale'', is set in Medieval Europe.
15th Jun '15 11:17:57 PM vifetoile
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* FloralMotifs: The Prioress, one of the few characters who has a proper name, is Madame Eglantine, referring to a kind of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_rubiginosa rose]], also known as a sweetbrier. Having a name that means "rose" is right in line with her sentimentality and bracelet reading "Love Conquers All."

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* FloralMotifs: FlowerMotifs: The Prioress, one of the few characters who has a proper name, is Madame Eglantine, referring to a kind of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_rubiginosa rose]], also known as a sweetbrier. Having a name that means "rose" is right in line with her sentimentality and bracelet reading "Love Conquers All."
15th Jun '15 11:16:19 PM vifetoile
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* FloralMotifs: The Prioress, one of the few characters who has a proper name, is Madame Eglantine, referring to a kind of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_rubiginosa rose]], also known as a sweetbrier. Having a name that means "rose" is right in line with her sentimentality and bracelet reading "Love Conquers All."



* NamelessNarrative

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* NamelessNarrativeNamelessNarrative: Very few of the characters have names; they are all identified by their occupation or social role.
23rd May '15 5:24:09 PM StFan
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* AdaptationSpeciesChange: A particularly odd example in "The Merchant's Tale:" Pluto and Proserpina, gods of ClassicalMythology, are portrayed as ''[[TheFairFolk fairies]]''.

to:

* AdaptationSpeciesChange: A particularly odd example in "The Merchant's Tale:" Tale": Pluto and Proserpina, gods of ClassicalMythology, Myth/ClassicalMythology, are portrayed as ''[[TheFairFolk fairies]]''.
23rd May '15 9:24:07 AM Morgenthaler
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->''"[[UsefulNotes/BritishWeather Whan that Aprille with his shoures soote,]]''
->''[[HappyRain The droghte of Marche hath perced to the roote]],''
->''[[WorldHealingWave And bathed every veyne in swich licour]],''
->''[[CreatingLife Of which vertu engendred is the flour]];''
->''[[Myth/ClassicalMythology Whan Zephirus eek with his swete breeth]]''
->''[[BlowYouAway Inspired hath in every holt and heeth]]''
->''[[CueTheSun The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne]]''
->''[[WesternZodiac Hath in the Ram his halfe cours y-ronne]] ''
->''[[NoisyNature And smale fowles maken melodye,]]''
->''[[TheSleepless That slepen al the night with open ye,]]''
->''[[CallToAdventure So priketh hem nature in hir corages:]]''
->''[[JumpedAtTheCall Than longen folk to goon on pilgrimages,]]''
->''[[WalkingTheEarth And palmers for to seken straunge strondes,]]''
->''[[ForeignCultureFetish To ferne halwes, couthe in sondry londes;]]''
->''[[TheQuest And specially, from every shires ende]]''
->''[[UsefulNotes/HomeCounties Of Engelond, to Caunterbury they wende,]]''
->''[[MartyrdomCulture The holy blisful martir for to seke,]]''
->''[[FindTheCure That hem hath holpen, whan that they were seke.]]"''
-->--Geoffrey Chaucer, ''Literature/TheCanterburyTales'' - Prologue in [[strike:Olde]] Middle English

to:

->''"[[UsefulNotes/BritishWeather Whan ->''"Whan that Aprille with his shoures soote,]]''
->''[[HappyRain
soote,\\
The droghte of Marche hath perced to the roote]],''
->''[[WorldHealingWave
roote,\\
And bathed every veyne in swich licour]],''
->''[[CreatingLife
licour,\\
Of which vertu engendred is the flour]];''
->''[[Myth/ClassicalMythology
flour;\\
Whan Zephirus eek with his swete breeth]]''
->''[[BlowYouAway
breeth\\
Inspired hath in every holt and heeth]]''
->''[[CueTheSun
heeth\\
The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne]]''
->''[[WesternZodiac
sonne\\
Hath in the Ram his halfe cours y-ronne]] ''
->''[[NoisyNature
y-ronne\\
And smale fowles maken melodye,]]''
->''[[TheSleepless
melodye,\\
That slepen al the night with open ye,]]''
->''[[CallToAdventure
ye,\\
So priketh hem nature in hir corages:]]''
->''[[JumpedAtTheCall
corages:\\
Than longen folk to goon on pilgrimages,]]''
->''[[WalkingTheEarth
pilgrimages,\\
And palmers for to seken straunge strondes,]]''
->''[[ForeignCultureFetish
strondes,\\
To ferne halwes, couthe in sondry londes;]]''
->''[[TheQuest
londes;\\
And specially, from every shires ende]]''
->''[[UsefulNotes/HomeCounties
ende\\
Of Engelond, to Caunterbury they wende,]]''
->''[[MartyrdomCulture
wende,\\
The holy blisful martir for to seke,]]''
->''[[FindTheCure
seke,\\
That hem hath holpen, whan that they were seke.]]"''
"''
-->--Geoffrey Chaucer, ''Literature/TheCanterburyTales'' - Prologue in [[strike:Olde]] Middle English
7th May '15 10:23:35 PM NarniaRanger
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Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationSpeciesChange: A particularly odd example in "The Merchant's Tale:" Pluto and Proserpina, gods of ClassicalMythology, are portrayed as ''[[TheFairFolk fairies]]''.
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