History Literature / TheCanterburyTales

8th Sep '17 12:25:39 PM reconditarmonia
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* BuffySpeak: No, really. Chaucer used "I guess" in the modern sense:
-->"Of twenty year of age he was, I guess."
7th Sep '17 12:52:59 PM fruitstripegum
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* TheDanza: Chaucer himself.
6th Sep '17 5:34:54 PM GrammarNavi
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* HistoryOfEnglish: Hugely, hugely important in the development of English as a literary language. Chaucer's work is arguably responsible for the adoption of his London dialect as the standard from which modern English developed. The roughly contemporary ''Literature/SirGawainAndTheGreenKnight'', alliterative blank verse written in a northern dialect, makes a fascinating comparison.

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* HistoryOfEnglish: UsefulNotes/HistoryOfEnglish: Hugely, hugely important in the development of English as a literary language. Chaucer's work is arguably responsible for the adoption of his London dialect as the standard from which modern English developed. The roughly contemporary ''Literature/SirGawainAndTheGreenKnight'', alliterative blank verse written in a northern dialect, makes a fascinating comparison.
5th Sep '17 8:15:16 AM fruitstripegum
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* AuthorExistenceFailure: Chaucer didn't even finish writing even one tale for each named pilgrim.
3rd Sep '17 11:05:09 PM Anorgil
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* NoodleImplements: In the Miller's Tale, when Absolom borrows the red-hot poker from the blacksmith, he is deliberately vague about what he intends to use it for.
13th Jun '17 7:57:05 AM SorPepita
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** Most villains in the Man of Law's Tale don't escape justice. The servants of the Sultan's wicked mother are slaughtered by the Romans ([[ KarmaHoudini: The Sultan's mother gets off scot-free, though]]), and King Alla orders his mother dead once he finds out about her trickery. The drunken messenger is also tortured.

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** Most villains in the Man of Law's Tale don't escape justice. The servants of the Sultan's wicked mother are slaughtered by the Romans ([[ KarmaHoudini: ([[KarmaHoudini The Sultan's mother gets off scot-free, though]]), and King Alla orders his mother dead once he finds out about her trickery. The drunken messenger is also tortured.
13th Jun '17 7:54:42 AM SorPepita
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* CreepyChild: The Prioress's tale concerns one. Gets even creepier when he gets killed...and [[NightmareFuel keeps singing that damn song of his]].
* CulturalCrossReference: The Squire's Tale is about none other than UsefulNotes/GenghisKhan (though the case has been made of the story fitting better with KublaiKhan, his great grandson). Ironically, medieval Europeans knew of him, but not of many of the places he conquered.

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* CreepyChild: The Prioress's tale concerns one. Gets even creepier when he gets killed... and [[NightmareFuel keeps singing that damn song of his]].
* CulturalCrossReference: The Squire's Tale is about none other than UsefulNotes/GenghisKhan (though the case has been made of the story fitting better with KublaiKhan, Kublai Khan, his great grandson). Ironically, medieval Europeans knew of him, but not of many of the places he conquered.



* DummiedOut: To say nothing of the fact that the characters never even reach the holy shrine, Chaucer actually just started the Cook's Tale...only to leave it as a short, unfinished fragment. Judging from the tone it would have resembled the crass anecdotes told by the Miller and the Reeve. (Coghill's tranlation advertises this tale on the back of the book for some reason.)

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* DummiedOut: To say nothing of the fact that the characters never even reach the holy shrine, Chaucer actually just started the Cook's Tale... only to leave it as a short, unfinished fragment. Judging from the tone it would have resembled the crass anecdotes told by the Miller and the Reeve. (Coghill's tranlation translation advertises this tale on the back of the book for some reason.)
25th May '17 12:03:25 PM DoktorvonEurotrash
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* HeManWomanHater: The Wife of Bath's fifth husband had an entire book full of stories about how horrible women are. She eventually forced him to change his ways, but not before he hit her hard enough to go deaf on one ear.
25th May '17 12:00:32 PM DoktorvonEurotrash
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** The Wife of Bath's last husband, [[DomesticAbuser Jankyn]], is described as this, at least in his younger days.
25th May '17 11:58:03 AM DoktorvonEurotrash
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** St. Cecilia in "The Second Nun's Tale". Unsurprising, given that she's a saint.
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