History Literature / TheBookOfNightWithMoon

31st May '17 6:06:40 PM nombretomado
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* GodOfEvil: While the Lone Power is as much the enemy as in ''YoungWizards'' and in much the same way, cats don't seem to separate Her out from the other Powers quite as much as humans do. She's a goddess to them - one whose work and desires need to be opposed at all costs, but a goddess to be reunited with the pantheon, not the Devil.

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* GodOfEvil: While the Lone Power is as much the enemy as in ''YoungWizards'' ''Literature/YoungWizards'' and in much the same way, cats don't seem to separate Her out from the other Powers quite as much as humans do. She's a goddess to them - one whose work and desires need to be opposed at all costs, but a goddess to be reunited with the pantheon, not the Devil.
17th May '17 2:23:55 AM Twiddler
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The ''Book of Night with Moon''/''Feline Wizards'' series is a sister series to ''Literature/YoungWizards'', also written by Creator/DianeDuane, following the adventures of a group of wizardly cats who maintain the worldgates in New York City. Currently there are three books: ''The Book of Night with Moon'', published in 1997, ''To Visit the Queen'', published in 1999, and ''The Big Meow'', written as a Storyteller's Bowl project but not "officially" published yet and currently available only via "subscribing" at [[http://the-big-meow.com/ the project web site]]. The series is targeted to adults instead of a YoungAdult audience, but the only difference this makes is the presence of some explicit references to sexuality and the fact that the viewpoint character, Rhiow, is an adult cat.

to:

The ''Book of Night with Moon''/''Feline Moon'' / ''Feline Wizards'' series is a sister series to ''Literature/YoungWizards'', also written by Creator/DianeDuane, following the adventures of a group of wizardly cats who maintain the worldgates in New York City. Currently there are three books: ''The Book of Night with Moon'', published in 1997, ''To Visit the Queen'', published in 1999, and ''The Big Meow'', written as a Storyteller's Bowl project but not "officially" published yet and currently available only via "subscribing" at [[http://the-big-meow.com/ the project web site]]. The series is targeted to adults instead of a YoungAdult audience, but the only difference this makes is the presence of some explicit references to sexuality and the fact that the viewpoint character, Rhiow, is an adult cat.
17th May '17 2:23:38 AM Twiddler
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The Book of Night with Moon/Feline Wizards series is a sister series to ''Literature/YoungWizards'', also written by Creator/DianeDuane, following the adventures of a group of wizardly cats who maintain the worldgates in New York City. Currently there are three books: ''The Book of Night with Moon'', published in 1997, ''To Visit the Queen'', published in 1999, and ''The Big Meow'', written as a Storyteller's Bowl project but not "officially" published yet and currently available only via "subscribing" at [[http://the-big-meow.com/ the project web site]]. The series is targeted to adults instead of a YoungAdult audience, but the only difference this makes is the presence of some explicit references to sexuality and the fact that the viewpoint character, Rhiow, is an adult cat.

to:

The Book ''Book of Night with Moon/Feline Wizards Moon''/''Feline Wizards'' series is a sister series to ''Literature/YoungWizards'', also written by Creator/DianeDuane, following the adventures of a group of wizardly cats who maintain the worldgates in New York City. Currently there are three books: ''The Book of Night with Moon'', published in 1997, ''To Visit the Queen'', published in 1999, and ''The Big Meow'', written as a Storyteller's Bowl project but not "officially" published yet and currently available only via "subscribing" at [[http://the-big-meow.com/ the project web site]]. The series is targeted to adults instead of a YoungAdult audience, but the only difference this makes is the presence of some explicit references to sexuality and the fact that the viewpoint character, Rhiow, is an adult cat.
26th Jul '16 6:04:59 PM Pichu-kun
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* NoBiologicalSex: Though they have gender identities, spayed or neutered cats are treated as basically this by cat society.
** The books state they the words "queen" and "tom" not just to differentiate from this but because "female" and "male" don't accurately portray just ''how'' important the distinction is to cats, who do after all go into heat. The narrator being a female spayed in kittenhood makes her viewpoint on same- and mixed-sex relations unusually humanlike... both for better (her viewpoint's more audience-relatable) and for worse (she tends to fail to notice or entirely misread subtext).

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* NoBiologicalSex: Though they have gender identities, spayed or neutered cats are treated as basically this by cat society.
**
society. The books state they the words "queen" and "tom" not just to differentiate from this but because "female" and "male" don't accurately portray just ''how'' important the distinction is to cats, who do after all go into heat. The narrator being a female spayed in kittenhood makes her viewpoint on same- and mixed-sex relations unusually humanlike... both for better (her viewpoint's more audience-relatable) and for worse (she tends to fail to notice or entirely misread subtext).



* StarfishLanguage: Ailurin qualifies from a human perspective, though there are at least two humans who learned to speak it anyway. It's a tonal language with 37 vowels, extremely sensitive to mispronunciation. The transcriptions are both rather approximate and condensed to be more accessible to the human audience. Also, what cats consider normal volume is inaudible to humans; to be heard by a human they have to shout. (This goes both ways: most human attempts to talk back to "their" cat(s) comes across as yelling in HulkSpeak and/or [[YouNoTakeCandle a horrible accent]].)
** The bit about volume is a little TruthInTelevision; cats really do have extraordinary hearing, and they can easily pick up a quiet sound from halfway down the block.
** And "shout" also refers to body language, which supposedly makes up a lot of what's being given as dialogue.

to:

* StarfishLanguage: Ailurin qualifies from a human perspective, though there are at least two humans who learned to speak it anyway. It's a tonal language with 37 vowels, extremely sensitive to mispronunciation. The transcriptions are both rather approximate and condensed to be more accessible to the human audience. Also, what cats consider normal volume is inaudible to humans; to be heard by a human they have to shout. (This goes both ways: most human attempts to talk back to "their" cat(s) comes across as yelling in HulkSpeak and/or [[YouNoTakeCandle a horrible accent]].)
**
) The bit about volume is a little TruthInTelevision; cats really do have extraordinary hearing, and they can easily pick up a quiet sound from halfway down the block.
**
block. And "shout" also refers to body language, which supposedly makes up a lot of what's being given as dialogue.
25th Jan '14 12:37:56 PM nombretomado
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The Book of Night with Moon/Feline Wizards series is a sister series to ''Literature/YoungWizards'', also written by DianeDuane, following the adventures of a group of wizardly cats who maintain the worldgates in New York City. Currently there are three books: ''The Book of Night with Moon'', published in 1997, ''To Visit the Queen'', published in 1999, and ''The Big Meow'', written as a Storyteller's Bowl project but not "officially" published yet and currently available only via "subscribing" at [[http://the-big-meow.com/ the project web site]]. The series is targeted to adults instead of a YoungAdult audience, but the only difference this makes is the presence of some explicit references to sexuality and the fact that the viewpoint character, Rhiow, is an adult cat.

to:

The Book of Night with Moon/Feline Wizards series is a sister series to ''Literature/YoungWizards'', also written by DianeDuane, Creator/DianeDuane, following the adventures of a group of wizardly cats who maintain the worldgates in New York City. Currently there are three books: ''The Book of Night with Moon'', published in 1997, ''To Visit the Queen'', published in 1999, and ''The Big Meow'', written as a Storyteller's Bowl project but not "officially" published yet and currently available only via "subscribing" at [[http://the-big-meow.com/ the project web site]]. The series is targeted to adults instead of a YoungAdult audience, but the only difference this makes is the presence of some explicit references to sexuality and the fact that the viewpoint character, Rhiow, is an adult cat.
30th Aug '13 12:46:55 AM StClair
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* StarfishLanguage: Ailurin qualifies from a human perspective, though there are at least two humans who learned to speak it anyway. It's a tonal language with 37 vowels, extremely sensitive to mispronunciation. The transcriptions are both rather approximate and condensed to be more accessible to the human audience. Also, what cats consider normal volume is inaudible to humans; to be heard by a human they have to shout. (This goes both ways: a typical human's attempts to talk back to "their" cat(s) comes across as yelling HulkSpeak with a horrible accent.)

to:

* StarfishLanguage: Ailurin qualifies from a human perspective, though there are at least two humans who learned to speak it anyway. It's a tonal language with 37 vowels, extremely sensitive to mispronunciation. The transcriptions are both rather approximate and condensed to be more accessible to the human audience. Also, what cats consider normal volume is inaudible to humans; to be heard by a human they have to shout. (This goes both ways: a typical human's most human attempts to talk back to "their" cat(s) comes across as yelling in HulkSpeak with and/or [[YouNoTakeCandle a horrible accent.accent]].)
30th Aug '13 12:44:59 AM StClair
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* StarfishLanguage: Ailurin qualifies from a human perspective, though there are at least two humans who learned to speak it anyway. It's a tonal language with 37 vowels, extremely sensitive to mispronunciation. The transcriptions are both rather approximate and condensed to be more accessible to the human audience. Also, what cats consider normal volume is inaudible to humans; to be heard by a human they have to shout. (This goes both ways: a typical human's attempts to talk back to "their" cat(s) comes across as yelling with a horrible accent.)

to:

* StarfishLanguage: Ailurin qualifies from a human perspective, though there are at least two humans who learned to speak it anyway. It's a tonal language with 37 vowels, extremely sensitive to mispronunciation. The transcriptions are both rather approximate and condensed to be more accessible to the human audience. Also, what cats consider normal volume is inaudible to humans; to be heard by a human they have to shout. (This goes both ways: a typical human's attempts to talk back to "their" cat(s) comes across as yelling HulkSpeak with a horrible accent.)
30th Aug '13 12:42:01 AM StClair
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* {{Masquerade}}: Not from other cats, but they make up for it with extra worrying about humans. Notably in the second book while planning a commuting schedule Rhiow (who's living with a human) asks Arhu (who she knows ''isn't'') whether there are any humans, anywhere he visits, who take special notice of him and might worry if he didn't turn up regularly. People can go to surprising lengths when a cat goes missing...

to:

* {{Masquerade}}: Not from other cats, but they make up for it with extra worrying about humans. Notably in the second book book, while planning a commuting schedule schedule: Rhiow (who's living with a human) asks Arhu (who she knows ''isn't'') whether there are any humans, anywhere he visits, who take special notice of him and might worry if he didn't turn up regularly. People can go to surprising lengths when a cat goes missing...



* StarfishLanguage: Ailurin qualifies from a human perspective, though there are at least two humans who learned to speak it anyway. It's a tonal language with 37 vowels, extremely sensitive to mispronunciation. The transcriptions are both rather approximate and condensed to be more accessible to the human audience. Also, what cats consider normal volume is inaudible to humans; to be heard by a human they have to shout.

to:

* StarfishLanguage: Ailurin qualifies from a human perspective, though there are at least two humans who learned to speak it anyway. It's a tonal language with 37 vowels, extremely sensitive to mispronunciation. The transcriptions are both rather approximate and condensed to be more accessible to the human audience. Also, what cats consider normal volume is inaudible to humans; to be heard by a human they have to shout. (This goes both ways: a typical human's attempts to talk back to "their" cat(s) comes across as yelling with a horrible accent.)
7th Jul '13 7:47:46 AM Robotech_Master
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The Book of Night with Moon/Feline Wizards series is a sister series to ''Literature/YoungWizards'', also written by DianeDuane, following the adventures of a group of wizardly cats who maintain the worldgates in New York City. Currently there are two books: ''The Book of Night with Moon'', published in 1997, and ''To Visit the Queen'', published in 1999. The series is targeted to adults instead of a YoungAdult audience, but the only difference this makes is the presence of some explicit references to sexuality and the fact that the viewpoint character, Rhiow, is an adult cat.

to:

The Book of Night with Moon/Feline Wizards series is a sister series to ''Literature/YoungWizards'', also written by DianeDuane, following the adventures of a group of wizardly cats who maintain the worldgates in New York City. Currently there are two three books: ''The Book of Night with Moon'', published in 1997, and ''To Visit the Queen'', published in 1999.1999, and ''The Big Meow'', written as a Storyteller's Bowl project but not "officially" published yet and currently available only via "subscribing" at [[http://the-big-meow.com/ the project web site]]. The series is targeted to adults instead of a YoungAdult audience, but the only difference this makes is the presence of some explicit references to sexuality and the fact that the viewpoint character, Rhiow, is an adult cat.
10th Mar '13 1:57:49 PM Andygal
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The Book of Night with Moon/Feline Wizards series is a sister series to ''YoungWizards'', also written by DianeDuane, following the adventures of a group of wizardly cats who maintain the worldgates in New York City. Currently there are two books: ''The Book of Night with Moon'', published in 1997, and ''To Visit the Queen'', published in 1999. The series is targeted to adults instead of a YoungAdult audience, but the only difference this makes is the presence of some explicit references to sexuality and the fact that the viewpoint character, Rhiow, is an adult cat.

to:

The Book of Night with Moon/Feline Wizards series is a sister series to ''YoungWizards'', ''Literature/YoungWizards'', also written by DianeDuane, following the adventures of a group of wizardly cats who maintain the worldgates in New York City. Currently there are two books: ''The Book of Night with Moon'', published in 1997, and ''To Visit the Queen'', published in 1999. The series is targeted to adults instead of a YoungAdult audience, but the only difference this makes is the presence of some explicit references to sexuality and the fact that the viewpoint character, Rhiow, is an adult cat.
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