History Literature / TessOfTheDUrbervilles

14th Jun '18 12:08:03 AM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AristocratsAreEvil: Alec is a phony aristocrat, but close enough.

to:

* AristocratsAreEvil: AristocratsAreEvil:
**
Alec is a phony aristocrat, but close enough.



* DownerEnding: [[spoiler: You ''could'' consider it a BittersweetEnding because Tess' sister and Angel go off with each other in the end. But, Tess still gets executed in the end after all the horrible things that have happened to her, so it fits best here.
** Even Angel and Tess' sister going off together is a downer, since under the laws of the time they can't marry: a man could not marry his deceased wife's sister in England. Given Angel's opinions on female chastity and the sister's purity, this basically dooms the relationship (unless the reader believes that Angel does change for the better). There is an attempted HandWave by Hardy.]]

to:

* DownerEnding: [[spoiler: You ''could'' consider it a BittersweetEnding because Tess' sister and Angel go off with each other in the end. But, Tess still gets executed in the end after all the horrible things that have happened to her, so it fits best here.
**
here. Even Angel and Tess' sister going off together is a downer, since under the laws of the time they can't marry: a man could not marry his deceased wife's sister in England. Given Angel's opinions on female chastity and the sister's purity, this basically dooms the relationship (unless the reader believes that Angel does change for the better). There is an attempted HandWave by Hardy.]]



* HidingBehindReligion: Hinted with Alec, [[ReasonYouSuckSpeech called out on]] by Tess.



** HidingBehindReligion: Hinted with Alec, [[ReasonYouSuckSpeech called out on]] by Tess.



* [[ILoveYouBecauseICantControlYou I Want You Because I Can't Control You]]: Alec's feelings toward Tess, especially after the rape. Before, it's clear that he just sees her as another conquest. However, after he's "mastered" her, Tess constantly shows no interest in anything further to do with him, and handily resists his efforts to keep her under his thumb by repeatedly choosing poverty and independence over accepting his strings-attached financial aid. [[spoiler: At least until the very end.]]

to:

* [[ILoveYouBecauseICantControlYou I Want You Because I Can't Control You]]: ILoveYouBecauseICantControlYou: Alec's feelings toward Tess, especially after the rape. Before, it's clear that he just sees her as another conquest. However, after he's "mastered" her, Tess constantly shows no interest in anything further to do with him, and handily resists his efforts to keep her under his thumb by repeatedly choosing poverty and independence over accepting his strings-attached financial aid. [[spoiler: At least until the very end.]]



* MeaningfulName: Tess names her baby Sorrow. Also Angel Clare and Mercy Chant.
** Arguably ironic, as their actions directly contradict the meanings of their names: the angel betrays his ward, and mercy condemns the innocent victim.

to:

* MeaningfulName: MeaningfulName:
**
Tess names her baby Sorrow. Also Sorrow.
**
Angel Clare and Mercy Chant.
** Arguably ironic,
Chant. Ironic, as their actions directly contradict the meanings of their names: the angel betrays his ward, and mercy condemns the innocent victim.



* ReplacementGoldfish: [[spoiler: In a bizarre application of this trope, Tess reassures Angel that he doesn't need to be sad when she dies, because her little sister has hit puberty and is just like a copy of Tess from before she met Alec, so Angel can marry ''her''. The narration appears to ''agree with her'' and this is seen as a good thing.
** This is deeper than it seems. Marrying a deceased wife's sister was considered incest by the more religiously conservative set at the time and because of that was actually ''illegal'' under English law. Angel's choice would be either to abandon the sister and keep her as his mistress (and given that she's a symbol of purity, that's unlikely), or emigrate with her to a country where such a marriage would be legal. Of course, Hardy might have tried to HandWave the situation by having Tess state that marrying her sister "is nothing. People marry in-laws continually about Marlott."]]

to:

* ReplacementGoldfish: [[spoiler: In a bizarre application of this trope, Tess reassures Angel that he doesn't need to be sad when she dies, because her little sister has hit puberty and is just like a copy of Tess from before she met Alec, so Angel can marry ''her''. The narration appears to ''agree with her'' and this is seen as a good thing.
**
thing. This is deeper than it seems. Marrying a deceased wife's sister was considered incest by the more religiously conservative set at the time and because of that was actually ''illegal'' under English law. Angel's choice would be either to abandon the sister and keep her as his mistress (and given that she's a symbol of purity, that's unlikely), or emigrate with her to a country where such a marriage would be legal. Of course, Hardy might have tried to HandWave the situation by having Tess state that marrying her sister "is nothing. People marry in-laws continually about Marlott."]]"



* TheSimpleLifeIsSimple: Angel quickly learns that it is ''not.'' The lifelong pampered son of a preacher gains a real admiration for those who have farmed, and will farm, all of their lives.
** [[spoiler: Doubly so when he leaves for the much harsher climate of Brazil.]]

to:

* TheSimpleLifeIsSimple: Angel quickly learns that it is ''not.'' The lifelong pampered son of a preacher gains a real admiration for those who have farmed, and will farm, all of their lives. \n** [[spoiler: Doubly so when he leaves for the much harsher climate of Brazil.]]
10th May '18 7:18:47 AM UnnaturalPonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DownerEnding: You ''could'' consider it a BittersweetEnding because Tess' sister and Angel go off with each other in the end. But, Tess still gets executed in the end after all the horrible things that have happened to her, so it fits best here.
** Even Angel and Tess' sister going off together is a downer, since under the laws of the time they can't marry: a man could not marry his deceased wife's sister in England. Given Angel's opinions on female chastity and the sister's purity, this basically dooms the relationship (unless the reader believes that Angel does change for the better). There is an attempted HandWave by Hardy.

to:

* DownerEnding: [[spoiler: You ''could'' consider it a BittersweetEnding because Tess' sister and Angel go off with each other in the end. But, Tess still gets executed in the end after all the horrible things that have happened to her, so it fits best here.
** Even Angel and Tess' sister going off together is a downer, since under the laws of the time they can't marry: a man could not marry his deceased wife's sister in England. Given Angel's opinions on female chastity and the sister's purity, this basically dooms the relationship (unless the reader believes that Angel does change for the better). There is an attempted HandWave by Hardy.]]
10th May '18 7:15:39 AM UnnaturalPonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DeusAngstMachina: Oh my, ''where to begin''? First, Tess accidentally kills her horse; she gets raped; her child dies and will not be buried by the local church. Then everyone in the village seems to have turned their back on her, and so she leaves. She meets Angel again, falls deeply in love with him, and they get married, but Angel freaks out at realizing she's not a virgin, and leaves her and goes to Brazil for a while. In the meantime, Tess works on a farm, employed by a man who knows about her past and ''constantly'' holds it above her. Her father dies. Her family has no money, and they lose their property. The only person who will help them is ''Alec'', and only if she becomes his mistress. After Tess is forced into this contract, Angel comes back; she kills Alec. She is arrested and finally hanged.
* DoubleStandard: Big time, mostly reflective of Victorian ethical standards, and the most egregious being Angel's past with another woman being readily forgiven by Tess, while Tess's rape is crime enough for Angel to leave for Brazil, abandoning Tess.

to:

* DeusAngstMachina: Oh my, ''where to begin''? First, Tess accidentally kills her horse; she gets raped; her child dies and will not be buried by the local church. Then everyone in the village seems to have turned their back on her, and so she leaves. She meets Angel again, falls deeply in love with him, and they get married, [[spoiler: but Angel freaks out at realizing she's not a virgin, and leaves her and goes to Brazil for a while. In the meantime, Tess works on a farm, employed by a man who knows about her past and ''constantly'' holds it above her. Her father dies. Her family has no money, and they lose their property. The only person who will help them is ''Alec'', and only if she becomes his mistress. After Tess is forced into this contract, Angel comes back; she kills Alec. She is arrested and finally hanged.
hanged.]]
* DoubleStandard: Big time, mostly reflective of Victorian ethical standards, and the most egregious being Angel's past with another woman being readily forgiven by Tess, while Tess's rape is crime enough for Angel [[spoiler: to leave for Brazil, abandoning Tess. Tess.]]



* ExtremeDoormat: Tess to Angel, especially after he finds out about her past and then mistreats and leaves her.

to:

* ExtremeDoormat: Tess to Angel, especially after he finds out about her past and then mistreats [[spoiler: and leaves her.]]



* HopeSpot: Tess’ life is actually looking up when she marries Angel…only for him to abandon her on their wedding night after finding out she’s not a virgin.
* {{Hypocrite}}: ''Angel''. He admires "purity" in others ([[DoubleStandard especially women]]), yet casually gave his away when he was younger. He admits as much to Tess on their wedding night. However, when Tess admits that she's also not a virgin (due to ''rape'') he dumps her for it. He also attempts to take up a mistress, Tess' friend, for Brazil, thus compromising that girl's "purity."

to:

* HopeSpot: Tess’ life is actually looking up when she marries Angel…only Angel. [[spoiler: Only for him to abandon her on their wedding night after finding out she’s not a virgin.
virgin.]]
* {{Hypocrite}}: ''Angel''. He admires "purity" in others ([[DoubleStandard especially women]]), yet casually gave his away when he was younger. He admits as much to Tess on their wedding night. [[spoiler: However, when Tess admits that she's also not a virgin (due to ''rape'') he dumps her for it. He also attempts to take up a mistress, Tess' friend, for Brazil, thus compromising that girl's "purity.""]]



* MoralDissonance: Examined with Angel. On their wedding night, after admitting that he had already had consensual sex with someone when he was younger, Angel completely loses it when Tess tells him she was ''raped'' and thinks less of her. So much so that he leaves her. Angel actually acknowledges that Tess "was more sinned against than sinning." It's the fact she's not a virgin that freaks him out and he doesn't even blame her for the rape. This sends him straight into the {{Jerkass}} zone.

to:

* MoralDissonance: Examined with Angel. On their wedding night, after admitting that he had already had consensual sex with someone when he was younger, Angel completely loses it when Tess tells him she was ''raped'' and thinks less of her. So [[spoiler:So much so that he leaves her. Angel actually acknowledges that Tess "was more sinned against than sinning." "]] It's the fact she's not a virgin that freaks him out and he doesn't even blame her for the rape. This sends him straight into the {{Jerkass}} zone.



* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: Angel, when he realizes that his rejection of Tess has forced her to return to Alec.
* NamesToTrustImmediately: Angel Clare, though it’s subverted in that he actually betrays Tess by abandoning her when she needs him most.

to:

* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: [[spoiler: Angel, when he realizes that his rejection of Tess has forced her to return to Alec.
Alec.]]
* NamesToTrustImmediately: Angel Clare, [[spoiler: though it’s subverted in that he actually betrays Tess by abandoning her when she needs him most.]]



* RainOfBlood: When Alec is killed by Tess, his blood leaks through the ceiling and drips on the landlady.

to:

* RainOfBlood: [[spoiler: When Alec is killed by Tess, his blood leaks through the ceiling and drips on the landlady.]]



* ReplacementGoldfish: In a bizarre application of this trope, Tess reassures Angel that he doesn't need to be sad when she dies, because her little sister has hit puberty and is just like a copy of Tess from before she met Alec, so Angel can marry ''her''. The narration appears to ''agree with her'' and this is seen as a good thing.
** This is deeper than it seems. Marrying a deceased wife's sister was considered incest by the more religiously conservative set at the time and because of that was actually ''illegal'' under English law. Angel's choice would be either to abandon the sister and keep her as his mistress (and given that she's a symbol of purity, that's unlikely), or emigrate with her to a country where such a marriage would be legal. Of course, Hardy might have tried to HandWave the situation by having Tess state that marrying her sister "is nothing. People marry in-laws continually about Marlott."

to:

* ReplacementGoldfish: [[spoiler: In a bizarre application of this trope, Tess reassures Angel that he doesn't need to be sad when she dies, because her little sister has hit puberty and is just like a copy of Tess from before she met Alec, so Angel can marry ''her''. The narration appears to ''agree with her'' and this is seen as a good thing.
** This is deeper than it seems. Marrying a deceased wife's sister was considered incest by the more religiously conservative set at the time and because of that was actually ''illegal'' under English law. Angel's choice would be either to abandon the sister and keep her as his mistress (and given that she's a symbol of purity, that's unlikely), or emigrate with her to a country where such a marriage would be legal. Of course, Hardy might have tried to HandWave the situation by having Tess state that marrying her sister "is nothing. People marry in-laws continually about Marlott.""]]



* SettleForSibling: Angel to Tess's little sister in the end.

to:

* SettleForSibling: [[spoiler: Angel to Tess's little sister in the end.]]



** Doubly so when he leaves for the much harsher climate of Brazil.

to:

** [[spoiler: Doubly so when he leaves for the much harsher climate of Brazil.]]



* TogetherInDeath: Subverted. Tess asks Angel whether he thinks they will be together again after death. Angel responds with an awkward pause, and eventually a kiss. Tess then breaks down crying, realizing this means no. She is executed in the next chapter.

to:

* TogetherInDeath: Subverted. Tess asks Angel whether he thinks they will be together again after death. Angel responds with an awkward pause, and eventually a kiss. Tess then breaks down crying, realizing this means no. [[spoiler: She is executed in the next chapter.]]



* UnstoppableRage: After finding out that Angel is still alive, and wants to reconcile with her, Tess sends him away before realizing what she has done, stabbing Alec to death so she can finally be with him.

to:

* UnstoppableRage: [[spoiler: After finding out that Angel is still alive, and wants to reconcile with her, Tess sends him away before realizing what she has done, stabbing Alec to death so she can finally be with him.]]



** Tess ''finally'' gives Angel one through a letter which reaches him too late.

to:

** Tess ''finally'' gives Angel one through a letter [[spoiler: which reaches him too late.]]
21st Aug '17 12:21:42 PM FordPrefect
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** This is deeper than it seems. Marrying a deceased wife's sister was considered incest by the more religiously conservative set at the time and because of that was actually ''illegal'' under English law. Angel's choice would be either to abandon the sister and keep her as his mistress (and given that she's a symbol of purity, that's unlikely), or emigrate with her to a country where such a marriage would be legal. Of course, Hardy might have tried to HandWave the situation by having Tess state that marrying her sister, "is nothing. People marry in-laws continually about Marlott."
* SaintlyChurch: Averted by Tess's church, who refuse to bury her innocent baby so that they can keep up appearances. Played more straight for the upper-class, but compassionate Reverend Clare who is raising his church that way, and even the text mentions it was unfortunate Tess encountered the Clares' pompous sons rather than the parents.

to:

** This is deeper than it seems. Marrying a deceased wife's sister was considered incest by the more religiously conservative set at the time and because of that was actually ''illegal'' under English law. Angel's choice would be either to abandon the sister and keep her as his mistress (and given that she's a symbol of purity, that's unlikely), or emigrate with her to a country where such a marriage would be legal. Of course, Hardy might have tried to HandWave the situation by having Tess state that marrying her sister, sister "is nothing. People marry in-laws continually about Marlott."
* SaintlyChurch: Averted by Tess's church, who refuse to bury her innocent baby so that they can keep up appearances. Played more straight for the upper-class, upper-class but compassionate Reverend Clare who is raising his church that way, and even the text mentions it was unfortunate Tess encountered the Clares' pompous sons rather than the parents.



* SoBeautifulItsACurse: Tess's mother exploits her beauty in hopes of connection to her rich "relation" Alec who rapes/seduces her and leaves her to suffer in a society that defines by her impurity and promptly blame her for it.

to:

* SoBeautifulItsACurse: Tess's mother exploits her beauty in hopes of connection to her rich "relation" Alec who rapes/seduces her and leaves her to suffer in a society that defines her by her impurity and promptly blame her for it.



** Many readers' reaction to Angel's coldhearted, self-righteous rejection of Tess on their wedding night.

to:

** Many readers' reaction to Angel's coldhearted, cold-hearted, self-righteous rejection of Tess on their wedding night.



* WrongGenreSavvy: Mrs. Durbeyfield, and the rest of the family, is certain that the plot will work out like a Cinderella story, where Alec D'Urberville will fall in love with Tess, and marry her, "making a lady of her" and elevating her family to a genteel position. This was common in other Victorian novels, it even might have happened in [[http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/173597 a Thomas Hardy poem]], but sadly, they live in a Thomas Hardy ''novel.''

to:

* WrongGenreSavvy: Mrs. Durbeyfield, Durbeyfield and the rest of the family, is family are certain that the plot will work out like a Cinderella story, where Alec D'Urberville will fall in love with Tess, Tess and marry her, "making a lady of her" and elevating her family to a genteel position. This was common in other Victorian novels, it even might have happened in [[http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/173597 a Thomas Hardy poem]], but sadly, they live in a Thomas Hardy ''novel.''
21st Aug '17 12:18:18 PM FordPrefect
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* MoralDissonance: Examined with Angel. On their wedding night, after admitting that he had already had consensual sex with someone when he was younger, Angel completely loses it when Tess tell him she was ''raped'' and thinks less of her. So much so that he leaves her. Angel actually acknowledges that Tess "was more sinned against than sinning." It's the fact she's not a virgin that freaks him out and he doesn't even blame her for the rape. This sends him straight into the {{Jerkass}}zone.

to:

* MoralDissonance: Examined with Angel. On their wedding night, after admitting that he had already had consensual sex with someone when he was younger, Angel completely loses it when Tess tell tells him she was ''raped'' and thinks less of her. So much so that he leaves her. Angel actually acknowledges that Tess "was more sinned against than sinning." It's the fact she's not a virgin that freaks him out and he doesn't even blame her for the rape. This sends him straight into the {{Jerkass}}zone.{{Jerkass}} zone.
21st Aug '17 12:15:23 PM FordPrefect
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DeathBySex: First, Alec rapes her which dooms her to society and her marriage with Angel. Then the text ''implies'' (and its depicted in TV miniseries and the 1979 film adaptation) that Angel and Tess consummated their marriage during their hideout at a mansion before Tess is taken to be executed.

to:

* DeathBySex: First, Alec rapes her which dooms her to society and her marriage with Angel. Then the text ''implies'' (and its it's depicted in TV miniseries and the 1979 film adaptation) that Angel and Tess consummated their marriage during their hideout at a mansion before Tess is taken to be executed.
20th Aug '16 1:58:47 PM Give1Take2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


--->'''Peasant Woman:''' Ee-hee-hee! Out of the frying pan and into the fire!

to:

--->'''Peasant -->'''Peasant Woman:''' Ee-hee-hee! Out of the frying pan and into the fire!



* {{Hypocrite}}: '''Angel'''. He admires "purity" (read: chastity) in others ([[DoubleStandard especially women]]), yet casually (and consensually) gave away his when he was younger. He admits as much to Tess on their wedding night. However, after he admits he's not a virgin and asks for her forgiveness, when she does so and confesses to and asks for the same, he refuses to grant it. He also attempts to take up a mistress, Tess' friend, for Brazil, thus compromising that girl's "purity."

to:

* {{Hypocrite}}: '''Angel'''. ''Angel''. He admires "purity" (read: chastity) in others ([[DoubleStandard especially women]]), yet casually (and consensually) gave his away his when he was younger. He admits as much to Tess on their wedding night. However, after he when Tess admits he's that she's also not a virgin and asks (due to ''rape'') he dumps her for her forgiveness, when she does so and confesses to and asks for the same, he refuses to grant it. He also attempts to take up a mistress, Tess' friend, for Brazil, thus compromising that girl's "purity."



* [[ILoveYouBecauseICantControlYou I Want You Because I Can't Control You]]: Alec's feelings toward Tess, especially after the rape. Before, it's clear that he just sees her as another conquest. However, after he's "mastered" her, Tess constantly shows no interest in anything further to do with him, and handily resists his efforts to keep her under his thumb; particularly by repeatedly choosing poverty and independence over accepting his strings-attached financial aid. [[spoiler: At least until the very end.]]
--->'''Alec:''' Remember, my lady, I was your master once! I will be your master again. If you are any man's wife, you are mine!

to:

* [[ILoveYouBecauseICantControlYou I Want You Because I Can't Control You]]: Alec's feelings toward Tess, especially after the rape. Before, it's clear that he just sees her as another conquest. However, after he's "mastered" her, Tess constantly shows no interest in anything further to do with him, and handily resists his efforts to keep her under his thumb; particularly thumb by repeatedly choosing poverty and independence over accepting his strings-attached financial aid. [[spoiler: At least until the very end.]]
--->'''Alec:''' -->'''Alec:''' Remember, my lady, I was your master once! I will be your master again. If you are any man's wife, you are mine!



--->My husband that was is gone away, and never will love me any more; but I love him just the same, and hate all other men, and like to make 'em think scornfully of me!

to:

--->My -->My husband that was is gone away, and never will love me any more; but I love him just the same, and hate all other men, and like to make 'em think scornfully of me!



--->'''Tess:''' I feel indignant with you for talking to me like this, when you know--when you know [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil what harm you've done me]]! You and those like you take your fill of pleasure on earth by making the life of such as me [[DefiledForever bitter and black with sorrow]]; and then it is a fine thing, when you have had enough of that, to think of securing your pleasure in Heaven by becoming converted!

to:

--->'''Tess:''' -->'''Tess:''' I feel indignant with you for talking to me like this, when you know--when you know [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil what harm you've done me]]! You and those like you take your fill of pleasure on earth by making the life of such as me [[DefiledForever bitter and black with sorrow]]; and then it is a fine thing, when you have had enough of that, to think of securing your pleasure in Heaven by becoming converted!



* SettleForSibling

to:

* SettleForSiblingSettleForSibling: Angel to Tess's little sister in the end.



* YoungerThanTheyLook: Tess is often described as seeming and acting much older than she is when she is a teenager. The early narration attributes her physical appearance to a " fullness of growth" that her mother assures her she'll grow into.

to:

* YoungerThanTheyLook: Tess is often described as seeming and acting much older than she is when she is a teenager. The early narration attributes her physical appearance to a " fullness "fullness of growth" that her mother assures her she'll grow into.
14th Aug '16 8:21:42 AM Cerys
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** This is deeper than it seems. Marrying a deceased wife's sister was considered incest by the more religiously conservative set at the time and because of that was actually ''illegal'' under English law. Angel's choice would be either to abandon the sister and keep her as his mistress (and given that she's a symbol of purity, that's unlikely), or emigrate with her to a country where such a marriage would be legal. Of course, Hardy might have tried to HandWave the situation by having Tess state that marrying her sister, "is nothing. People marry in-laws continually about Marrott."

to:

** This is deeper than it seems. Marrying a deceased wife's sister was considered incest by the more religiously conservative set at the time and because of that was actually ''illegal'' under English law. Angel's choice would be either to abandon the sister and keep her as his mistress (and given that she's a symbol of purity, that's unlikely), or emigrate with her to a country where such a marriage would be legal. Of course, Hardy might have tried to HandWave the situation by having Tess state that marrying her sister, "is nothing. People marry in-laws continually about Marrott.Marlott."
13th Jun '16 8:34:37 PM Angeldeb82
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Because of the themes presented in the book, such as religious themes and -- God forbid, an unmarried woman who's not a virgin being presented as ultimately moral and good -- it was controversial in its time. Today, it is hailed as classic literature.

to:

Because of the themes presented in the book, such as religious themes and -- and, God forbid, an unmarried woman who's not a virgin being presented as ultimately moral and good -- it was controversial in its time. Today, it is hailed as classic literature.
28th Sep '15 1:48:52 AM WillBGood
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* CreatorBreakdown

to:

* %%* CreatorBreakdown
This list shows the last 10 events of 60. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TessOfTheDUrbervilles