History Literature / SongsOfInnocenceAndOfExperience

11th Sep '15 3:58:09 AM Morgenthaler
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How Do You Like Them Apples has been deemed to be Not A Trope by the Trope Repair Shop. Examples will be moved to other tropes where appropriate.
* HowDoYouLikeThemApples: the fruit of "A POISON TREE".
17th Jan '15 1:49:10 PM Quag15
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** There's [[FridgeBrilliance quite a bit of]] RealitySubtext involved here: ''Songs of Innocence'' was written while TheFrenchRevolution was still considered [[TheRevolutionWillNotBeVilified brave and good]] and published in 1789, while ''Songs of Experience'' was published in 1794, during the ReignOfTerror.
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** There's [[FridgeBrilliance quite a bit of]] RealitySubtext involved here: ''Songs of Innocence'' was written while TheFrenchRevolution UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution was still considered [[TheRevolutionWillNotBeVilified brave and good]] and published in 1789, while ''Songs of Experience'' was published in 1794, during the ReignOfTerror.
23rd Jul '12 4:59:57 AM NemesisKane
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Added DiffLines:
** There's [[FridgeBrilliance quite a bit of]] RealitySubtext involved here: ''Songs of Innocence'' was written while TheFrenchRevolution was still considered [[TheRevolutionWillNotBeVilified brave and good]] and published in 1789, while ''Songs of Experience'' was published in 1794, during the ReignOfTerror.
21st Jul '12 9:27:26 PM nombretomado
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''Songs of Innocence and of Experience'', or to give the full title, ''Songs of Innocence and of Experience: Shewing the Two Contrary States of the Human Soul'', is a book by the English artist and [[{{Romanticism}} Romantic]] poet WilliamBlake. It consists of two collections of poems, originally published in separate volumes. Notably, no two printings are alike.
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''Songs of Innocence and of Experience'', or to give the full title, ''Songs of Innocence and of Experience: Shewing the Two Contrary States of the Human Soul'', is a book by the English artist and [[{{Romanticism}} Romantic]] poet WilliamBlake.Creator/WilliamBlake. It consists of two collections of poems, originally published in separate volumes. Notably, no two printings are alike.
26th Apr '12 6:53:52 PM TheMightyHeptagon
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Added DiffLines:
** Another interpretation, though, is that the Tyger is simply one of Lucifer's many guises (representing chaos and revolutionary spirit rather than evil), with the lines about "The stars [throwing] down their spears" and weeping put in as an allusion to Lucifer's angels (sometimes represented as stars) being defeated in the rebellion against God.
16th Feb '12 8:31:41 AM LordGro
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To YMMV.
!This book provides examples of:
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!This !! This book provides examples of:

* FairForItsDay: "The Little Black Boy" is clearly intended to be anti-racism, but due to ValuesDissonance, appears to have some very UnfortunateImplications, particularly in the final stanza. * FreudWasRight: "The Sick Rose", especially the print. * ForbiddenFruit: the apples in "A POISON TREE".
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* FairForItsDay: "The Little Black Boy" is clearly intended to be anti-racism, but due to ValuesDissonance, appears to have some very UnfortunateImplications, particularly in the final stanza. * FreudWasRight: "The Sick Rose", especially the print. * ForbiddenFruit: the ForbiddenFruit: ** The apples in "A POISON TREE".
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