History Literature / SlaughterhouseFive

23rd Sep '16 1:21:26 PM AtticusOmundson
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[[quoteright:250:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Slaughterhouse-Five_7434.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:250:http://static.[[quoteright:311:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Slaughterhouse-Five_7434.jpg]]
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[[caption-width-right:311:[[ArcWords "So it goes..."]]]]
15th Sep '16 11:44:44 AM bkitu
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* ShellShockedVeteran: Billy, in spades. It's entirely possible that his time-traveling and alien encounters aren't real, but instead are his coping mechanisms.



* WarIsHell: The core, but admitedly futile and redundant, theme of the book.

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* WarIsHell: The core, but admitedly admittedly futile and redundant, theme of the book.
23rd Jul '16 4:04:25 PM lalaTKG
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* {{Bishounen}}: One of the German soldiers who first capture Roland and Billy, to the point where he's described as looking like Eve from the Bible.



* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: Averted. The aversion is also {{lampshade}}d in the first chapter.


Added DiffLines:

* PrettyBoy: One of the German soldiers who first capture Roland and Billy, to the point where he's described as looking like Eve from the Bible.
20th Jul '16 10:11:17 PM saltin
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Added DiffLines:

* GoldDigger: Billy marries Valencia because the resulting marriage will be both bearable and, more importantly, profitable.
19th Jul '16 11:04:46 PM saltin
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Added DiffLines:

* DeathSeeker: Billy isn't afraid of death. He doesn't mind living so much, but to put the degree this trope influences his character in perspective, he was quite annoyed when his father saved him from drowning while he was a child as it was a rather calm and almost pleasant experience.


Added DiffLines:

* DissonantSerenity: Billy during the second World War as his visions of the future all but assure him that he's going to make it out of the conflict all right. This disturbs everyone around him, but on his end, he urges them to prioritize their safety over his own because at least his is guaranteed.


Added DiffLines:

* KarmicDeath: Two of Weary's "Three Musketeers" who ditched him and Billy because they thought they stood a better chance of not getting captured by German troops that way [[spoiler:are shot to death minutes after.]] Roland Weary, a disturbed bully obsessed with torture, is forced to march in hinged clogs that wound his feet and wrack them in ceaseless pain; he eventually [[spoiler:dies of gangrene from his injuries.]]


Added DiffLines:

* NotSoDifferent: Unbeknownst to a German soldier and Billy himself, they both saw a vision of Adam and Eve in the former's golden boots.


Added DiffLines:

* WarIsHell: The core, but admitedly futile and redundant, theme of the book.
2nd Jun '16 5:22:11 PM YasminPerry
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An intensively autobiographical novel (minus the time travel and aliens bits), ''Slaughterhouse-Five, or the Children's Crusade: A Duty-Dance with Death'' is one of the books Vonnegut is most remembered for and contains philosophies about free will, fate, life, and death, often through the use of irony. For example, scholarly discussion usually holds that Billy and the Tralfamadorians are the examples of what is ''wrong'' and that free will, and therefore moral responsibility to try to prevent war, futile though it may seem, are the correct paths.

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An intensively autobiographical novel book (minus the time travel and aliens bits), ''Slaughterhouse-Five, or the Children's Crusade: A Duty-Dance with Death'' is one of the books Vonnegut is most remembered for and contains philosophies about free will, fate, life, and death, often through the use of irony. For example, scholarly discussion usually holds that Billy and the Tralfamadorians are the examples of what is ''wrong'' and that free will, and therefore moral responsibility to try to prevent war, futile though it may seem, are the correct paths.
2nd Jun '16 5:13:53 PM YasminPerry
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''Slaughterhouse-Five'' is Creator/KurtVonnegut's 1969 masterpiece about Billy Pilgrim, a soldier who witnessed the bombing of Dresden and subsequently gets kidnapped by Tralfamadorian aliens, who can see in all four dimensions and thus see all events in their lives in no particular order. Billy becomes UnstuckInTime, marries a nice girl, experiences death for a while, befriends Kilgore Trout (Vonnegut's recurring AuthorAvatar in TheVerse), and lives his life like most other humans -- just less chronologically. Tralfamadorians don't believe you can change anything, but that doesn't mean you can't choose to focus on a particular time, and to enjoy life the way it happens. Billy learns to accept life as well as death -- if something dies, then [[ArcWords so it goes.]]

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''Slaughterhouse-Five'' is Creator/KurtVonnegut's 1969 masterpiece novel about Billy Pilgrim, a soldier who witnessed the bombing of Dresden and subsequently gets kidnapped by Tralfamadorian aliens, who can see in all four dimensions and thus see all events in their lives in no particular order. Billy becomes UnstuckInTime, marries a nice girl, experiences death for a while, befriends Kilgore Trout (Vonnegut's recurring AuthorAvatar in TheVerse), and lives his life like most other humans -- just less chronologically. Tralfamadorians don't believe you can change anything, but that doesn't mean you can't choose to focus on a particular time, and to enjoy life the way it happens. Billy learns to accept life as well as death -- if something dies, then [[ArcWords so it goes.]]
16th Feb '16 10:36:44 AM eroock
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->It begins like this: ''"Listen: Billy Pilgrim has come UnstuckInTime."'' It ends like this: ''"Poo-tee-weet?"''

->Everything was beautiful and nothing hurt.

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->It ->''It begins like this: ''"Listen: "Listen: Billy Pilgrim has come UnstuckInTime."'' " It ends like this: ''"Poo-tee-weet?"''

->Everything
"Poo-tee-weet?"''

->''Everything
was beautiful and nothing hurt.
hurt.''
4th Sep '15 5:27:18 AM Morgenthaler
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* DatedHistory: It's stated several times that 135,000 people were killed in the bombing of Dresden. Vonnegut took this figure from David Irving's book, ''The Destruction of Dresden'', which even appears in the novel. Back in the '60s, Irving was considered a respectable historian, and his figures were widely accepted. Since then, he came out as a Holocaust denier and fell into disgrace. It also turned out that he inflated the figures, and the actual casualties were no higher than 25,000.



* HistoryMarchesOn: It's stated several times that 135,000 people were killed in the bombing of Dresden. Vonnegut took this figure from David Irving's book, ''The Destruction of Dresden'', which even appears in the novel. Back in the '60s, Irving was considered a respectable historian, and his figures were widely accepted. Since then, he came out as a Holocaust denier and fell into disgrace. It also turned out that he inflated the figures, and the actual casualties were no higher than 25,000.
4th May '15 11:16:59 AM nombretomado
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* ItsNotPornItsArt: André Le Fèvre, the maker of the first dirty photograph in the world, which depicted the woman having sex with a pony tried to argue before court that "the picture was fine art, and that his intention was to make Greek mythology come alive". (Indeed, there are several stories in ClassicalMythology where gods have sex with mortals taking the form of animals).

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* ItsNotPornItsArt: André Le Fèvre, the maker of the first dirty photograph in the world, which depicted the woman having sex with a pony tried to argue before court that "the picture was fine art, and that his intention was to make Greek mythology come alive". (Indeed, there are several stories in ClassicalMythology Myth/ClassicalMythology where gods have sex with mortals taking the form of animals).
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