History Literature / SlaughterhouseFive

10th Sep '17 8:27:48 PM CassandraLeo
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* WarIsHell: The core, but admittedly futile and redundant, theme of the book.

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* WarIsHell: The Mrs. O'Here certainly feels this way and this is proven in a surprisingly non-{{Anvilicious}} way. It is the core, but admittedly futile and redundant, theme of the book.book.
* WritersSuck: Kilgore Trout is a complete failure as a writer. His only fan, Eliot Rosewater (who introduces Billy to his work) says that Trout deserves his obscurity, because while his ideas are great, his execution is terrible.



** {{Deconstructed}} as it's being used ironically as this mentality is held up as an example of the wrong way to cope with war trauma.

to:

** {{Deconstructed}} as it's being used ironically ironically, as this mentality is held up as an example of the wrong way to cope with war trauma.



* WarIsHell: Mrs. O'Here certainly feels this way and this is proven in a surprisingly non-{{Anvilicious}} way.
* WritersSuck: Kilgore Trout is a complete failure as a writer. His only fan, Eliot Rosewater (who introduces Billy to his work) says that Trout deserves his obscurity, because while his ideas are great, his execution is terrible.

to:

* WarIsHell: Mrs. O'Here certainly feels this way and this is proven in a surprisingly non-{{Anvilicious}} way.
* WritersSuck: Kilgore Trout is a complete failure as a writer. His only fan, Eliot Rosewater (who introduces Billy to his work) says that Trout deserves his obscurity, because while his ideas are great, his execution is terrible.
15th Jul '17 10:37:37 AM nombretomado
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Why aliens, and why time travel? Because Vonnegut wanted to write about his experiences in WorldWarII, but he didn't want to write a story about BigDamnHeroes. Instead, his character is simply a meek observer: Billy gets to see the war and the world from a distance, objectively, as if through the eyes of aliens.

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Why aliens, and why time travel? Because Vonnegut wanted to write about his experiences in WorldWarII, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, but he didn't want to write a story about BigDamnHeroes. Instead, his character is simply a meek observer: Billy gets to see the war and the world from a distance, objectively, as if through the eyes of aliens.



* RedShirt: Any side character mentioned in the WW2 segments will probably be dead soon. Like, in a few pages. Doesn't mean that it's any less sad, or that it can't be jarring (honestly, who expected [[spoiler: Roland Weary]] to go out like that?).

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* RedShirt: Any side character mentioned in the WW2 UsefulNotes/WW2 segments will probably be dead soon. Like, in a few pages. Doesn't mean that it's any less sad, or that it can't be jarring (honestly, who expected [[spoiler: Roland Weary]] to go out like that?).



* WorldWarII
19th Feb '17 6:05:07 AM girlyboy
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* VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: There are a couple parts of the book that were based on Vonnegut's own experiences, such as the descriptions of Dresden post-bombing and Edgar Derby being executed for looting a teapot.

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* VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: There are a couple parts of the book that were based on Vonnegut's own experiences, such as the descriptions of Dresden post-bombing and Edgar Derby being executed for looting a teapot. "All this happened, more or less."
21st Dec '16 9:00:50 AM Discar
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-->The last word was still a novelty in the speech of white people in 1944. It was fresh and astonishing to Billy, [[AManIsNotAVirgin who had never fucked anybody]].

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-->The last word was still a novelty in the speech of white people in 1944. It was fresh and astonishing to Billy, [[AManIsNotAVirgin who had never fucked anybody]].anybody.
23rd Sep '16 1:21:26 PM AtticusOmundson
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[[quoteright:250:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Slaughterhouse-Five_7434.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:250:http://static.[[quoteright:311:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Slaughterhouse-Five_7434.jpg]]
org/pmwiki/pub/images/4981.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:311:[[ArcWords "So it goes..."]]]]
15th Sep '16 11:44:44 AM bkitu
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* ShellShockedVeteran: Billy, in spades. It's entirely possible that his time-traveling and alien encounters aren't real, but instead are his coping mechanisms.



* WarIsHell: The core, but admitedly futile and redundant, theme of the book.

to:

* WarIsHell: The core, but admitedly admittedly futile and redundant, theme of the book.
23rd Jul '16 4:04:25 PM lalaTKG
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* {{Bishounen}}: One of the German soldiers who first capture Roland and Billy, to the point where he's described as looking like Eve from the Bible.



* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: Averted. The aversion is also {{lampshade}}d in the first chapter.


Added DiffLines:

* PrettyBoy: One of the German soldiers who first capture Roland and Billy, to the point where he's described as looking like Eve from the Bible.
20th Jul '16 10:11:17 PM saltin
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Added DiffLines:

* GoldDigger: Billy marries Valencia because the resulting marriage will be both bearable and, more importantly, profitable.
19th Jul '16 11:04:46 PM saltin
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Added DiffLines:

* DeathSeeker: Billy isn't afraid of death. He doesn't mind living so much, but to put the degree this trope influences his character in perspective, he was quite annoyed when his father saved him from drowning while he was a child as it was a rather calm and almost pleasant experience.


Added DiffLines:

* DissonantSerenity: Billy during the second World War as his visions of the future all but assure him that he's going to make it out of the conflict all right. This disturbs everyone around him, but on his end, he urges them to prioritize their safety over his own because at least his is guaranteed.


Added DiffLines:

* KarmicDeath: Two of Weary's "Three Musketeers" who ditched him and Billy because they thought they stood a better chance of not getting captured by German troops that way [[spoiler:are shot to death minutes after.]] Roland Weary, a disturbed bully obsessed with torture, is forced to march in hinged clogs that wound his feet and wrack them in ceaseless pain; he eventually [[spoiler:dies of gangrene from his injuries.]]


Added DiffLines:

* NotSoDifferent: Unbeknownst to a German soldier and Billy himself, they both saw a vision of Adam and Eve in the former's golden boots.


Added DiffLines:

* WarIsHell: The core, but admitedly futile and redundant, theme of the book.
2nd Jun '16 5:22:11 PM YasminPerry
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An intensively autobiographical novel (minus the time travel and aliens bits), ''Slaughterhouse-Five, or the Children's Crusade: A Duty-Dance with Death'' is one of the books Vonnegut is most remembered for and contains philosophies about free will, fate, life, and death, often through the use of irony. For example, scholarly discussion usually holds that Billy and the Tralfamadorians are the examples of what is ''wrong'' and that free will, and therefore moral responsibility to try to prevent war, futile though it may seem, are the correct paths.

to:

An intensively autobiographical novel book (minus the time travel and aliens bits), ''Slaughterhouse-Five, or the Children's Crusade: A Duty-Dance with Death'' is one of the books Vonnegut is most remembered for and contains philosophies about free will, fate, life, and death, often through the use of irony. For example, scholarly discussion usually holds that Billy and the Tralfamadorians are the examples of what is ''wrong'' and that free will, and therefore moral responsibility to try to prevent war, futile though it may seem, are the correct paths.
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