History Literature / Sharpe

16th Sep '17 4:25:30 PM nombretomado
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* AmericaSavesTheDay: In the novel ''Sharpe's Siege'', Sharpe and the Chosen Men engineer their way out of a fort surrounded by the French by surrendering it to an American privateer who was fighting the WarOf1812 - and trapped in the fort with them. This plot was discarded in the television episode in favor of Sharpe having to fight his way out. Again due to budgetary constraints.

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* AmericaSavesTheDay: In the novel ''Sharpe's Siege'', Sharpe and the Chosen Men engineer their way out of a fort surrounded by the French by surrendering it to an American privateer who was fighting the WarOf1812 UsefulNotes/WarOf1812 - and trapped in the fort with them. This plot was discarded in the television episode in favor of Sharpe having to fight his way out. Again due to budgetary constraints.
28th Jun '17 11:20:56 AM john_e
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Added DiffLines:

* HistoricalVillainDowngrade: The author's note for ''Sharpe's Enemy'' notes that he'd written Pot-au-Feu as more of an IneffectualSympatheticVillain than the ruthless criminal he probably was -- presumably to differentiate him from Hakeswill, with whom he teams up.
18th May '17 4:09:25 AM althesmith
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* {{BFS}}: Sharpe's 1796 pattern heavy cavalry sword. Not big by anime standards, but definitely heavier than almost anything anyone would try to fence with. Sharpe prefers the heft of the larger cavalry swords for their ability to power through enemy officers blocks and inflict tremendous wounds on his foes. ([[http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/1304958034706_3723.jpg Cornwell owns one himself]].)

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* {{BFS}}: Sharpe's 1796 pattern heavy cavalry sword. Not big by anime standards, but definitely heavier than almost anything anyone would try to fence with. Sharpe prefers the heft of the larger cavalry swords for their ability to power through enemy officers blocks and inflict tremendous wounds on his foes. ([[http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/1304958034706_3723.jpg Cornwell owns one himself]].)) It is worth noting that this pattern sword still only came in at about 2.5 lbs.
30th Apr '17 6:10:20 AM DarkPhoenix94
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* BondVillainStupidity: Displayed both by Sharpe and his enemies. Pierre Ducos in particular just ''has'' to humiliate and utterly destroy Sharpe in all of his schemes, which hamstrings them because Sharpe always gets past them. Sharpe in India keeps trying to kill Hakeswill in elaborate ways involving animals, which never work, and he never sticks around to see the outcome: [[spoiler: The Tipoo Sultan's tigers don't eat Hakeswill because they've been fed. Hakeswill escapes being crushed by Dowlat Rao Scindia's elephant by jabbing it with a knife. It isn't explained how he escapes being killed by Manu Bapoo's snakes, but Sharpe should really have known by then.]]

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* BondVillainStupidity: Displayed both by Sharpe and his enemies. Pierre Ducos in particular just ''has'' to humiliate and utterly destroy Sharpe in all of his schemes, which hamstrings them because Sharpe always gets past them. Sharpe in India keeps trying to kill Hakeswill in elaborate ways involving animals, which never work, and he never sticks around to see the outcome: [[spoiler: The Tipoo Sultan's tigers don't eat Hakeswill because they've been fed. Hakeswill escapes being crushed by Dowlat Rao Scindia's elephant by jabbing it with a knife. It isn't explained how he escapes being killed by Manu Bapoo's snakes, but Sharpe should really have known by then.]] This is partly justified by the fact that the India books were written after the books about Sharpe's chronologically later adventures, meaning that Hakeswill had to survive India. InUniverse, it might be said that Sharpe does get wise to the fact that trying to murder Hakeswill in elaborate fashions doesn't work, and ends up [[spoiler: blowing his head off from point blank range with his rifle.]]



** In various novels the green rifle jacket marks one as a rifleman separate from the common infantry of the British Army. The French even give them a nickname partly because of the jackets.

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** In various novels the green rifle jacket marks one as a rifleman separate from the common infantry of the British Army. The French even give them a nickname ('grasshoppers') partly because of the jackets.



* CorruptChurch: If the Catholic Church shows up, it will either be in the form of a high-ranking prelate, who will be a scumbag, or an honest village priest, who will be a lovely person. Notably, the Inquisitor, Father Hacha, is a foul individual, as is the Cardinal of Naples, who seems to have read about Rodrigo Borgia and tried to imitate him as far as possible, only with more child abuse. This is a common feature of Cornwell's writing, owing to a childhood as part of a fairly extreme Christian sect which left him with a hearty distaste for organised religion.

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* CorruptChurch: If the Catholic Church shows up, it will either be in the form of a high-ranking prelate, who will be a scumbag, or an honest village local priest, who will be a lovely person. Notably, the Inquisitor, Father Hacha, is a foul individual, as is the Cardinal of Naples, who seems to have read about Rodrigo Borgia and tried to imitate him as far as possible, only with more child abuse. This is a common feature of Cornwell's writing, owing to a childhood as part of a fairly extreme Christian sect which left him with a hearty distaste for organised religion.



** Arguably, Sharpe himself. He goes from lowly rifleman to great war hero and ends up able to quote Voltaire to boot. Of course, it helps to have a girlfriend who can speak French.

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** Arguably, Sharpe himself. He goes from lowly rifleman to a great war hero fluent in French and Spanish and ends up able to quote Voltaire to boot. Of course, it helps to have a Spanish wife, then later a girlfriend who can speak French.



* DeliberateInjuryGambit: The villain in the novel ''Sharpe's Gold'' is a far more skilled swordsman with a superior blade, so to defeat him Sharpe lets himself be stabbed in the leg and then kills his opponent while the guy is trying to pull his blade out.

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* DeliberateInjuryGambit: The villain in the novel ''Sharpe's Gold'' is a far more skilled swordsman with a superior blade, so to defeat him Sharpe lets himself be stabbed in the leg and then kills his opponent while the guy is trying to pull his blade out. Pretty much everyone who hears about this thinks that Sharpe was insane.



* DragonInChief: Sharpe to Lieutenant-Colonel Girdwood.
** Technically speaking, Sharpe to Lawford, when the latter commands the South Essex, though in contrast to the example above, this is a partnership - Lawford is a good soldier, but he's primarily focused on using his military career as a boost for his political career, which is where he thrives. At the same time, he recognises Sharpe's brilliance and trusts him completely, meaning that he takes Sharpe's advice and on the battlefield, generally lets him do exactly as he pleases.



* DroppedGlasses: In ''Sharpe's Enemy'', Sharpe throws Major Ducos' glasses on the ground and crushes them. Badass, sure, but [[BullyingADragon earning the ire]] of a [[MagnificentBastard ruthless French spymaster]] winds up causing Sharpe havoc for years to come.
* DudeWheresMyRespect?: No matter how many times Sharpe saves Wellington's bacon or saves the army or defeats the bad guys or performs other heroic feats, the rich, gentlemanly officers think he's just an arrogant upstart who needs to be taught his place. This becomes a common them with Sharpe often clashing with the wealthy upper class of the officers, except his closest friends, most of whom are in even worse circumstances than his own, as is often the case with soldiers after the war is done.

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* DroppedGlasses: In ''Sharpe's Enemy'', Sharpe throws smashes Major Ducos' glasses on the ground and crushes them.glasses. Badass, sure, but [[BullyingADragon earning the ire]] of a [[MagnificentBastard ruthless French spymaster]] winds up causing Sharpe havoc for years to come.
* DudeWheresMyRespect?: No matter how many times Sharpe saves Wellington's bacon or saves the army or defeats the bad guys or performs other heroic feats, the rich, gentlemanly officers (with a very few exceptions) think he's just an arrogant upstart who needs to be taught his place. This becomes a common them with Sharpe often clashing with the wealthy upper class of the officers, except his closest friends, most of whom are in even worse circumstances than his own, as is often the case with soldiers after the war is done.



* UsefulNotes/TheDukeOfWellington: The series' BigGood, although GoodIsNotNice and he has a limited tolerance for Sharpe's shenanigans when they cause him trouble - however, he is still willing to give him considerable latitude on the grounds that Sharpe gets results.

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* UsefulNotes/TheDukeOfWellington: The series' BigGood, although GoodIsNotNice and he has a limited tolerance for Sharpe's shenanigans when they cause him trouble - however, he is still willing to give him considerable latitude on the grounds that Sharpe gets results.results, and he does acknowledge what he owes Sharpe, finally [[spoiler: giving him command of the South Essex at the Battle of Waterloo, bidding him to take them forward.]]



** Sharpe and his [[TheSquad Chosen Men]] are members of the 95th Rifles, an elite unit using camouflage, skirmisher tactics and advanced (for the time) weaponry, hence, the closest thing to special forces in the Napoleonic Era. True to form, everyone seems completely incapable of getting anything done without them. Although 'glamorous' may not be exactly the word; none of them are exactly gentlemen.

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** Sharpe and his [[TheSquad Chosen Men]] are members of the 95th Rifles, an elite unit using camouflage, skirmisher tactics and advanced (for the time) weaponry, hence, the closest thing to special forces in the Napoleonic Era. True to form, (for the most part) everyone seems completely incapable of getting anything done without them. Although 'glamorous' may not be exactly the word; none of them are exactly gentlemen.



* ExtremeMeleeRevenge: ''Sharpe's Company'', when storming the breach Sharpe gets carried away and butchers a French soldier who was surrendering. He immediately realizes and regrets this.

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* ExtremeMeleeRevenge: ''Sharpe's Company'', when storming the breach Sharpe gets carried away and butchers a French soldier who was surrendering. He immediately realizes realises and regrets this.



* FakeAmerican: In-universe example, as Sharpe always pretends to be American to avoid anti-British prejudice when encountered alone by potential enemies. At this point in history American and British accents were similar enough for this to plausible thanks to the American Revolution having been fairly recent history.

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* FakeAmerican: In-universe example, as Sharpe always pretends to be American to avoid anti-British prejudice when encountered alone by potential enemies. enemies, a habit he started in Copenhagen. At this point in history American and British accents were similar enough for this to plausible thanks to the American Revolution having been fairly recent history.history - also, the habit of Royal Navy deserters of defecting to the States.



* FatalFlaw: Sharpe's is beautiful women. He's never quite sure how to act around them. Granted, the fact that he usually ends up in bed with them is a point in his favour, [[TheDulcineaEffect but Sharpe also has a habit of believing]] ''[[TheDulcineaEffect anything]]'' [[TheDulcineaEffect a beautiful woman tells him.]]

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* FatalFlaw: Sharpe's is beautiful women. He's never quite sure how to act around them. Granted, the fact that he usually ends up in bed with them is a point in his favour, [[TheDulcineaEffect but Sharpe also has a habit of believing]] ''[[TheDulcineaEffect anything]]'' [[TheDulcineaEffect a beautiful woman tells him.]]him, and doing anything she asks him to boot.]] As Hogan at one point complains, King Arthur would have loved Sharpe, precisely because of his habit of leaping on a white charger and looking for ladies to rescue.



* FourthDateMarriage: Frederickson suggests marriage to Lucille the day he meets her. Immediately after she has accidentally [[spoiler: shot Sharpe.]] Of course, she [[spoiler: prefers the charms of Sharpe, just like every woman in the Sharpeverse.]] Then again, Frederickson, while a good man, [[spoiler: is hardly a looker and described as something of a misogynist - he doesn't necessarily see women as beneath him, but he doesn't like them very much, probably as a defence mechanism against rejection. Sharpe, by contrast, is roguishly handsome and Major Hogan at one point remarks that King Arthur would have loved Sharpe simply for his proclivity for hopping on a (metaphorical) white charger and galloping to the rescue.]]

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* FourthDateMarriage: Frederickson suggests marriage to Lucille the day he meets her. Immediately after she has accidentally [[spoiler: shot Sharpe.]] Of course, she [[spoiler: prefers the charms of Sharpe, just like almost every woman in the Sharpeverse.Sharpeverse who isn't paired off with someone else.]] Then again, Frederickson, while a good man, [[spoiler: is hardly a looker and described as something of a misogynist - he doesn't necessarily see women as beneath him, but he doesn't like them very much, probably as a defence mechanism against rejection. Sharpe, by contrast, is roguishly handsome and Major Hogan at one point remarks that King Arthur would have loved Sharpe simply for his proclivity for hopping on a (metaphorical) white charger and galloping to the rescue.]]



* IGaveMyWord: Lawford has to admit the truth when asked on his word of honor.

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* IGaveMyWord: Lawford has to admit the truth when asked on his word of honor.honour.



* InsigniaRipOffRitual: Sharpe does it to a mutineer in ''Sharpe's Gold''

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* InsigniaRipOffRitual: Sharpe does it to a mutineer in ''Sharpe's Gold''Gold.''



* ItHasBeenAnHonor: To Gudin, after they are found out, in ''Tiger''

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* ItHasBeenAnHonor: To Gudin, after they are found out, in ''Tiger''''Tiger.''



** After Major Ducos gets a bloody nose (so to speak) from Sharpe early on in the series, every one of his "destabilise and destroy Wellington's army" schemes simply ''must'' involve the humiliation and total annihilation of Richard Sharpe.
** Sharpe and Hakeswill have this for each other mutually. Sharpe would love nothing more then to be able to kill and/or humiliate Hakeswill and Hakeswill feels the same about Sharpe.

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** After Major Ducos gets a bloody nose (so to speak) from Sharpe early on in the series, every one of his "destabilise and destroy Wellington's army" schemes simply ''must'' involve the humiliation and total annihilation of Richard Sharpe.
Sharpe. This is ultimately his downfall, though on several occasions he comes extremely close to succeeding.
** Sharpe and Hakeswill have this for each other mutually.other. Sharpe would love nothing more then to be able to kill and/or humiliate Hakeswill and Hakeswill feels the same about Sharpe.



** Hakeswill, for about four books of near-continuous evil.
** To a lesser extent, Sharpe himself. He's a thief and a murderer although his victims are all bad people.

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** Hakeswill, for about four and a half books of near-continuous evil.
** To a lesser extent, Sharpe himself. He's a thief and a murderer murderer, although his victims are all bad people.people.
** Sergeant Havercamp of ''Sharpe's Regiment'' also gets away with everything he did, as he's a LovableRogue and points out, accurately, that he's the best recruiting Sergeant that Sharpe's got.
** Lieutenant-Colonel Girdwood appears to be this, at first... then it becomes very obvious that Sharpe's keeping him around because he can control him.
* KingIncognito: In ''Sharpe's Regiment'', Sharpe and Harper take on fake identities and enlist as recruits in order to find out what happened to the South Essex Regiment's 2nd Battalion, which doesn't seem to exist yet still draws pay and rations. It works as this trope because the recruiters, Sergeants and officers frequently bring up [[FamedInStory the great Major Richard Sharpe and his faithful lancer, Regimental Sergeant Major Patrick Harper]], as examples of sheer balls-to-the-wall heroism and how far enlisted men can go in the South Essex. [[CrowningMomentOfFunny There's a great scene]] where the recruiting Sergeant goes on at length about how he taught Sharpe and Harper everything they know and now they're [=BFFs=], completely unaware that he's talking ''to'' Sharpe and Harper.



* KingIncognito: In ''Sharpe's Regiment'', Sharpe and Harper take on fake identities and enlist as recruits in order to find out what happened to the South Essex Regiment's 2nd Battalion, which doesn't seem to exist yet still draws pay and rations. It works as this trope because the recruiters, Sergeants and officers frequently bring up [[FamedInStory the great Major Richard Sharpe and his faithful lancer, Regimental Sergeant Major Patrick Harper]], as examples of sheer balls-to-the-wall heroism and how far enlisted men can go in the South Essex. [[CrowningMomentOfFunny There's a great scene]] where the recruiting Sergeant goes on at length about how he taught Sharpe and Harper everything they know and now they're [=BFFs=], completely unaware that he's talking ''to'' Sharpe and Harper.
* TheManTheyCouldntHang: Sergeant Hakeswill, who is convinced he can't die because he survived being hanged as a child, and indeed does manage to escape several apparently fatal events. These include being thrown into a cage full of tigers, placed under the foot of an elephant, and tossed into a snake pit. As it turns out, however, he's not ImmuneToBullets, especially when they're administered by a firing squad.

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* KingIncognito: In ''Sharpe's Regiment'', Sharpe and Harper take on fake identities and enlist as recruits in order to find out what happened to the South Essex Regiment's 2nd Battalion, which doesn't seem to exist yet still draws pay and rations. It works as this trope because the recruiters, Sergeants and officers frequently bring up [[FamedInStory the great Major Richard Sharpe and his faithful lancer, Regimental Sergeant Major Patrick Harper]], as examples of sheer balls-to-the-wall heroism and how far enlisted men can go in the South Essex. [[CrowningMomentOfFunny There's a great scene]] where the recruiting Sergeant goes on at length about how he taught Sharpe and Harper everything they know and now they're [=BFFs=], completely unaware that he's talking ''to'' Sharpe and Harper.
* TheManTheyCouldntHang: Sergeant Hakeswill, who is convinced he can't die because he survived being hanged as a child, and indeed does manage to escape several apparently fatal events. These include being thrown into a cage full of tigers, placed under the foot of an elephant, and tossed into a snake pit. As it turns out, however, he's not ImmuneToBullets, especially when they're administered by a firing squad.squad - or at least, he appears to survive, then Sharpe administers the coup de grace with a rifle bullet from point blank range.



* MurderIsTheBestSolution: Sharpe is decidedly prone to murdering his enemies, whether they're on his own side or not.



* NotSoDifferent: Sharpe and General Calvet. Both men from humble origins who owe their positions and success to the men in charge of their respective armies, and who care deeply for their men.
* ObstructiveBureaucrat: [=McCandless=] plays this, after tampering with a warrant.

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* NotSoDifferent: Sharpe and General Calvet. Both men from humble origins who owe their positions and success to the men in charge of their respective armies, have reputations for ruthlessness, and who care deeply for their men.
** Lord Cochrane in ''Sharpe's Devil'' is also reminiscent of Sharpe when he was younger, carving out a reputation for being able to pull off the impossible, repeatedly doing insane things and getting away with them - and he was every bit as mad in RealLife as he's depicted as being in ''Sharpe's Devil'', if not more so. They're even pretty much the same age, with only two years between them.
* ObstructiveBureaucrat: [=McCandless=] plays this, this on Sharpe's behalf, after tampering with a warrant.



--> '''Lt Col Lawford''': Lieutenant Slingsby, tells me that you insulted him. That you invited him to a duel. That you called him illegitimate. That you swore at him.

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--> '''Lt Col Lawford''': Lieutenant Slingsby, Slingsby tells me that you insulted him. That you invited him to a duel. That you called him illegitimate. That you swore at him.



** Sgt. Lynch's when he realises that the Irish recruit he's been bullying for the past weeks is Sergeant-Major Harper, who is itching for payback.
* TheOnlyOne: No matter how large the armies or how complicated the situations, it inevitably falls to Sharpe, the Chosen Men and/or the South Essex Light Company to save the day and defeat the bad guys.

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** Sgt. Lynch's when he realises that the Irish recruit he's been bullying for the past weeks is Sergeant-Major Harper, who is itching for payback.
payback. He gets another one when he realises that [[spoiler: he's been sent on a mission to concealed part of the battlefield with Harper and several other Irishmen, who've also suffered under him, and they're all ''grinning'' at him...]]
* TheOnlyOne: No matter how large the armies or how complicated the situations, it inevitably falls to Sharpe, the Chosen Men and/or the South Essex Light Company to save the day and defeat the bad guys.guys - or at least, do what needs to be done to let the rest of the army win the battle.



** The ''entire damn army''. According to Wellington and Hogan, all the enlisted men in the British army are either gutter bastards, drunks, thieves, rapists or murderers and at least three of those describe Sharpe himself.

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** The ''entire damn army''. According to Wellington and Hogan, all the enlisted men in the British army are either gutter bastards, drunks, thieves, rapists or murderers and at least three of those describe Sharpe himself.himself (since Sharpe's attitude to rapists is positively murderous and he's rarely seen drunk, save when he's phenomenally depressed, the rest is merely a matter of elimination).



** And even more appropriately, "Our army is the scum of the earth, the merest scum of the earth...but by God, what fine fellows have we made of them!"

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** And even more appropriately, "Our army is the scum of the earth, the merest scum of the earth... but by God, what fine fellows have we made of them!"



** Teresa Moreno: She leads a band of Guerilla fighters against the French.

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** Teresa Moreno: Moreno a.k.a. 'La Aguja' (The Needle, a name Sharpe gave her). She leads a band of Guerilla fighters against the French.



* TheRedBaron: All partisans get a nickname, with Teresa being known as 'La Aguja' (the Needle - Sharpe gave her the name). Other notable heroic partisans include 'El Castrador' (exactly what it sounds like), and villainous ones include 'El Catolico' (Teresa's betrothed, so named for his habit of saying the Latin prayer for the dead as he kills his enemies) and 'El Matarife' (the Slaughterman).



* ShotInTheAss: How Sharpe decides to end a duel in ''Sharpe's Revenge''... Pity the guy he shot ended up presiding over a hearing for a crime Sharpe was alledged to have commited.

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* ShotInTheAss: How Sharpe decides to end ends a duel in ''Sharpe's Revenge''... Revenge'' (though according to Sharpe himself, he was aiming for a gut shot)... Pity the guy he shot ended up presiding over a hearing for a crime Sharpe was alledged alleged to have commited.committed.



** Manuel Batista is a sadistic profiteer too busy trying to make a pile of money off of his governorship of Chile to do anything about the fact that Spanish rule in South America is collapsing around him.

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** Manuel Batista Bautista is a sadistic profiteer too busy trying to make a pile of money off of his governorship of Chile to do anything about the fact that Spanish rule in South America is collapsing around him.



** Lord William Hale suffers from the same utter failures of manliness and morality that plague Ducos. He is possibly the most pathetic example on this list, being cuckolded by Sharpe, drugged by his wife to facilitate said cuckolding, mocked behind his back by everyone and [[StealthInsult belittled to his face by Sharpe]]. and [[spoiler: is ultimately shot in the face by his wife when he confronts and tries to murder her over her infidelity.]] What places him squarely in this trope is that the audience does not feel one jot or iota of sympathy for him, even pre-[[spoiler: murder attempt]].

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** Lord William Hale suffers from the same utter failures of manliness and morality and courage that plague Ducos. He is possibly the most pathetic example on this list, being cuckolded by Sharpe, drugged by his wife to facilitate said cuckolding, mocked behind his back by everyone and [[StealthInsult belittled to his face by Sharpe]]. and Further, he [[spoiler: is ultimately shot in the face by his wife when he confronts and tries to murder her over her infidelity.]] What places him squarely in this trope is that the audience does not feel one jot or iota of sympathy for him, even pre-[[spoiler: murder attempt]].



* SpinOffspring[=/=]BabiesEverAfter: Sharpe and Lucille's son, Patrick Lassan, is a minor character in ''The Starbuck Chronicles'', another series by Cornwell set during the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar. In that series, Patrick is a Chasseur Colonel of the French Imperial Guard and a French Military Observer attached to the Union Army. He carries and uses Sharpe's old sword, though his father was apparently disappointed that his son joined the French cavalry rather than the British infantry. By 1862, when the novel was set, Sharpe had died (unsurprising, considering that he'd be close to 90) and Lucille was still alive, though apparently very lonely. Patrick's sister Dominique is mentioned as the Countess of Benfleet and the mother of five children.

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* SpinOffspring[=/=]BabiesEverAfter: Sharpe and Lucille's son, Patrick Lassan, is a minor character in ''The Starbuck Chronicles'', another series by Cornwell set during the UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar. In that series, Patrick is a Chasseur Colonel of the French Imperial Guard and a French Military Observer attached to the Union Army. He carries and uses Sharpe's old sword, though his father was apparently disappointed that his son joined the French cavalry rather than the British infantry. By 1862, when the novel was set, Sharpe had died (unsurprising, considering that he'd be close to 90) and Lucille was still alive, though apparently very lonely. Patrick's younger sister Dominique is mentioned as the Countess of Benfleet and the mother of five children.



** Sharpe is generally this to any useless superiors, and even tries to murder the very useless Prince of Orange at Waterloo.

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** Sharpe is generally this to any useless superiors, and even tries to murder the very useless Prince of Orange at Waterloo.Waterloo - though only after the Prince's incompetence had got several entire battalions slaughtered and he looked set to get more killed.
22nd Feb '17 2:24:47 PM fusilcontrafusil
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The novels have been adapted into ''[[Series/{{Sharpe}} a series of television movies]]'' starring Creator/SeanBean as Richard Sharpe, alongside Daragh O'Malley as Patrick Harper and a slew of British talent in supporting roles (see Trivia), running regularly between 1993 and 1997, and with two additional miniseries in 2006 and 2008. The series was well-received and proved [[StarMakingRole a breakout role]] for Bean, who went on to star in ''Film/{{GoldenEye}}'', ''Film/TheLordOfTheRings'' and ''Series/GameOfThrones''. Much of the plot and backstory from the novels was compressed, modified or jettisoned, and several new stories were invented for the screen.

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The novels have been adapted into ''[[Series/{{Sharpe}} [[Series/{{Sharpe}} a series of television movies]]'' movies]] starring Creator/SeanBean as Richard Sharpe, alongside Daragh O'Malley as Patrick Harper and a slew of British talent in supporting roles (see Trivia), running regularly between 1993 and 1997, and with two additional miniseries in 2006 and 2008. The series was well-received and proved [[StarMakingRole a breakout role]] for Bean, who went on to star in ''Film/{{GoldenEye}}'', ''Film/TheLordOfTheRings'' and ''Series/GameOfThrones''. Much of the plot and backstory from the novels was compressed, modified or jettisoned, and several new stories were invented for the screen.
22nd Feb '17 2:24:20 PM fusilcontrafusil
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The novels have been adapted into a series of television movies starring Creator/SeanBean as Richard Sharpe, alongside Daragh O'Malley as Patrick Harper and a slew of British talent in supporting roles (see Trivia), running regularly between 1993 and 1997, and with two additional miniseries in 2006 and 2008. The series was well-received and proved a breakout role for Bean, who went on to star in ''Film/{{GoldenEye}}'', ''Film/TheLordOfTheRings'' and ''Series/GameOfThrones''. Much of the plot and backstory from the novels was compressed, modified or jettisoned, and several new stories were invented for the screen.

to:

The novels have been adapted into ''[[Series/{{Sharpe}} a series of television movies movies]]'' starring Creator/SeanBean as Richard Sharpe, alongside Daragh O'Malley as Patrick Harper and a slew of British talent in supporting roles (see Trivia), running regularly between 1993 and 1997, and with two additional miniseries in 2006 and 2008. The series was well-received and proved [[StarMakingRole a breakout role role]] for Bean, who went on to star in ''Film/{{GoldenEye}}'', ''Film/TheLordOfTheRings'' and ''Series/GameOfThrones''. Much of the plot and backstory from the novels was compressed, modified or jettisoned, and several new stories were invented for the screen.
9th Feb '17 11:13:33 AM SantosLHalper
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* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: While the French were infamous for their brutal treatment of civilians in RealLife, the lurid and almost sensationalistic depiction of French atrocities of the series seems to be far more reminiscent of the Nazi Germany or even ISIS in terms of excessiveness and [[KickTheDog sheer pointlessness.]]
22nd Jan '17 7:40:23 AM ImperialMajestyXO
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* AffablyEvil: Lord Pumphrey is charming, witty, erudite, possibly in love with Sharpe and has no morals except government interests. His personality is so infectious that Sharpe, even after everything Pumps has done, can't bear to kill him (though Pumphrey was armed and too influential to just kill.)



* AffablyEvil: Lord Pumphrey is charming, witty, erudite, possibly in love with Sharpe and has no morals except government interests. His personality is so infectious that Sharpe, even after everything Pumps has done, can't bear to kill him (though Pumphrey was armed and too influential to just kill.)
12th Jan '17 5:51:43 PM pwiegle
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* ActionGirl: Teresa is a famous partisan leader called La Aguja - The Needle. She unwinds by killing Frenchmen.

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* ActionGirl: Teresa is a famous partisan leader called La Aguja - The Needle. Needle (because she favors the stiletto and the rapier.) She unwinds by killing Frenchmen.



* EyepatchOfPower: Frederickson has one. He takes it off when going into battle, though.

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* EyepatchOfPower: Frederickson has one. He takes it off when going into battle, though. Along with his false teeth and his horsehair wig.



* TheManTheyCouldntHang: Sergeant Hakeswill, who is convinced he can't die because he survived being hanged as a child, and indeed does manage to escape several apparently fatal events. These include being thrown into a cage full of tigers, placed under the foot of an elephant, and tossed into a snake pit. As it turns out, however, he's not ImmuneToBullets.

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* TheManTheyCouldntHang: Sergeant Hakeswill, who is convinced he can't die because he survived being hanged as a child, and indeed does manage to escape several apparently fatal events. These include being thrown into a cage full of tigers, placed under the foot of an elephant, and tossed into a snake pit. As it turns out, however, he's not ImmuneToBullets.ImmuneToBullets, especially when they're administered by a firing squad.
8th Jan '17 7:56:02 AM SeptimusHeap
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** Sharpe's mother was a prostitute, which makes her son [[FreudWasRight less than fond of pimps]]. Sharpe calling someone a pimp is not only an insult, its the worst insult he can think of.

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** Sharpe's mother was a prostitute, which makes her son [[FreudWasRight less than fond of pimps]].pimps. Sharpe calling someone a pimp is not only an insult, its the worst insult he can think of.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.Sharpe