History Literature / SenseAndSensibility

24th Apr '17 5:44:14 AM XFllo
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* GenreSavvy: Elinor is quick at correctly identifying everyone's role in the {{Love Triangle}}s around her. She deduces that Lucy is a ClingyJealousGirl probably faster than the reader could at that point.
16th Dec '16 9:45:36 AM LadyNorbert
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* IceQueen: Lady Middleton and Fanny Ferrars Dashwood -- it's their mutual coldness that attracts them to pursue a friendship with one another. Later, Willoughby indicates that his wife Sophia is one of these as well, although the reader gets no direct confirmation because she's never seen.



* IllGirl: Marianne, after some time moping about in a damp garden.
* InformedAttribute[=/=]DesignatedLoveInterest: There are only a very few instances of Elinor and Edward's relationship being shown to the reader before it's explained that Elinor has fallen in love with him. In fact, he isn't even introduced on the page before the narrative is explaining that Elinor's mother has observed an attachment growing between her daughter and the young man, and there's never a very concise explanation for why Elinor falls for him. In truth, the novel does a better job of showing the reader her relationship with Colonel Brandon, which makes it somewhat more understandable why a lot of the other characters ship the two of them. Both major film versions [[AdaptationExpansion go to great lengths to set up a more believable romance]] between Edward and Elinor.



* ItsAllAboutMe:
** Marianne is deeply self-absorbed, considering ''her'' feelings (whether positive or negative) absolutely irrepressible and in the process disregarding common politeness and the feelings of others; when circumstances force Elinor to confess that she too has been unhappy, Marianne breaks down in tears of remorse, forcing Elinor to comfort her ''again'', and continues to wallow in her own unhappiness -- with added guilt, now -- rather than provide emotional support for Elinor. It takes near-death to smarten her up. Granted, she's a teenager, but it's a major contrast with Elinor, who's 19 at the start of the novel, and displays more responsibility and consideration for others than many people much older than her.
** All of the Ferrars family, with the exception of Edward, are deeply self-absorbed and will do just about anything to avoid being of use to anyone else. The narration notes that his mother seems to have a strange fear of being reproached for being too good-natured.


Added DiffLines:

* IceQueen: Lady Middleton and Fanny Ferrars Dashwood -- it's their mutual coldness that attracts them to pursue a friendship with one another. Later, Willoughby indicates that his wife Sophia is one of these as well, although the reader gets no direct confirmation because she's never seen.
* IllGirl: Marianne, after some time moping about in a damp garden.
* InformedAttribute[=/=]DesignatedLoveInterest: There are only a very few instances of Elinor and Edward's relationship being shown to the reader before it's explained that Elinor has fallen in love with him. In fact, he isn't even introduced on the page before the narrative is explaining that Elinor's mother has observed an attachment growing between her daughter and the young man, and there's never a very concise explanation for why Elinor falls for him. In truth, the novel does a better job of showing the reader her relationship with Colonel Brandon, which makes it somewhat more understandable why a lot of the other characters ship the two of them. Both major film versions [[AdaptationExpansion go to great lengths to set up a more believable romance]] between Edward and Elinor.
* ItsAllAboutMe:
** Marianne is deeply self-absorbed, considering ''her'' feelings (whether positive or negative) absolutely irrepressible and in the process disregarding common politeness and the feelings of others; when circumstances force Elinor to confess that she too has been unhappy, Marianne breaks down in tears of remorse, forcing Elinor to comfort her ''again'', and continues to wallow in her own unhappiness -- with added guilt, now -- rather than provide emotional support for Elinor. It takes near-death to smarten her up. Granted, she's a teenager, but it's a major contrast with Elinor, who's 19 at the start of the novel, and displays more responsibility and consideration for others than many people much older than her.
** All of the Ferrars family, with the exception of Edward, are deeply self-absorbed and will do just about anything to avoid being of use to anyone else. The narration notes that his mother seems to have a strange fear of being reproached for being too good-natured.
28th Oct '16 9:44:04 PM LadyNorbert
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* CleaningUpRomanticLooseEnds: Disjoining Edward and Lucy so Edward and Elinor can be together. Then [[PairTheSpares pairing up]] Lucy with Edward's brother and Marianne with Brandon.

to:

* CleaningUpRomanticLooseEnds: Disjoining Edward and Lucy so Edward and Elinor can be together. Then together, then [[PairTheSpares pairing up]] Lucy with Edward's brother and Marianne with Brandon.



* EvenEvilHasStandards: When Fanny Dashwood notices her mother, Mrs. Ferrars, sneering at Elinor's artwork, Fanny ventures to compliment it. Even the narrator states "Perhaps Fanny thought for a moment that her mother had been quite rude enough."
* ExactWords: Fanny convinces John to weasel out of his promise to his father by emphasizing that his father never asked him to do anything ''specific'' for the Dashwood sisters: just to "help them." He soon considers helping them move the furniture to be a reasonable fulfillment of the promise.
* [[FirstGirlWins First Guy Wins]]: Colonel Brandon.
* FirstNameBasis: A big deal in Georgian times. When Elinor overhears Willoughby calling Marianne by her Christian name, she takes it as a sign that they're either engaged or as good as.

to:

* EvenEvilHasStandards: When Fanny Dashwood notices her mother, Mrs. Ferrars, sneering at Elinor's artwork, Fanny ventures to compliment it. Even the narrator states states, "Perhaps Fanny thought for a moment that her mother had been quite rude enough."
* ExactWords: Fanny convinces John to weasel out of his promise to his father by emphasizing that his father never asked him to do anything ''specific'' for the Dashwood sisters: his sisters, just to "help them." He soon considers helping them move the furniture to be a reasonable fulfillment of the promise.promise, and is chagrined to find that he's not actually able to do it because all their things have to be sent by water.
* [[FirstGirlWins First Guy Wins]]: Colonel Brandon.
Brandon saw Marianne before Willoughby ever arrived in Devonshire.
* FirstNameBasis: A big deal in Georgian times. When Elinor overhears Willoughby calling Marianne by her Christian name, she takes it as a sign that they're either engaged or as good as. It's also noted in the narration that when the Steele sisters stay with the Dashwood, Fanny calls Lucy by her Christian name as an indication of how attached she is to her.



** Edward is sensible, well-mannered, and well-educated. His brother Robert is a self-absorbed fop.



* GenreSavvy: Elinor is quick at correctly identifying everyone's role in the LoveTriangle[=s=] around her. She deduces that Lucy is a ClingyJealousGirl probably faster than the reader could at that point.

to:

* GenreSavvy: Elinor is quick at correctly identifying everyone's role in the LoveTriangle[=s=] {{Love Triangle}}s around her. She deduces that Lucy is a ClingyJealousGirl probably faster than the reader could at that point.



** Marianne is deeply self-absorbed, considering ''her'' feelings (whether positive or negative) absolutely irrepressible and in the process disregarding common politeness and the feelings of others; when circumstances force Elinor to confess that she too has been unhappy, Marianne breaks down in tears of remorse, forcing Elinor to comfort her ''again'', and continues to wallow in her own unhappiness -- with added guilt, now -- rather than provide emotional support for Elinor. It takes near-death to smarten her up. Granted, she's a teenager, but it's a major contrast with Elinor, who's 19 and displays more responsibility and consideration for others than many people much older than her.
** All of the Ferrars family, with the exception of Edward, are deeply self-absorbed and will do just about anything to avoid being of use to anyone else.

to:

** Marianne is deeply self-absorbed, considering ''her'' feelings (whether positive or negative) absolutely irrepressible and in the process disregarding common politeness and the feelings of others; when circumstances force Elinor to confess that she too has been unhappy, Marianne breaks down in tears of remorse, forcing Elinor to comfort her ''again'', and continues to wallow in her own unhappiness -- with added guilt, now -- rather than provide emotional support for Elinor. It takes near-death to smarten her up. Granted, she's a teenager, but it's a major contrast with Elinor, who's 19 at the start of the novel, and displays more responsibility and consideration for others than many people much older than her.
** All of the Ferrars family, with the exception of Edward, are deeply self-absorbed and will do just about anything to avoid being of use to anyone else. The narration notes that his mother seems to have a strange fear of being reproached for being too good-natured.



** Elinor. Though it's more I Want My Beloved to Behave in a Morally Upright Manner; after several conversations with Lucy, Elinor is perfectly certain that Edward will ''not'' be happy if he marries Lucy, due to Lucy's poor character and shallow, selfish personality. However, breaking an engagement was a very serious breach of trust in that time, so he still needs to go through with it. [[spoiler: She still gets him.]]

to:

** Elinor. Though it's more I Want My Beloved to Behave in a Morally Upright Manner; after several conversations with Lucy, Elinor is perfectly certain that Edward will ''not'' be happy if he marries Lucy, due to Lucy's poor character and shallow, selfish personality. However, breaking an engagement was a very serious breach of trust in that time, so he still needs to go through with it. [[spoiler: She still gets him.him in the end.]]



* JerkWithAHeartOfGold: Willoughby at one point attempts to portray himself as this. [[spoiler:It doesn't work]].

to:

* JerkWithAHeartOfGold: Willoughby at one point attempts to portray himself as this. [[spoiler:It doesn't work]].work.]]



** Lady Middleton averts this only barely. Her first name - Mary - is used all of once in the entire book, by her mother.



* TheNotLoveInterest: Colonel Brandon and Elinor, who half the cast eventually start shipping as much as Brandon/Marianne. Even Elinor admits to herself that she can understand the logic of their belief.

to:

* TheNotLoveInterest: Colonel Brandon and Elinor, who half the cast eventually start shipping as much as Brandon/Marianne. Even Elinor admits to herself that she can understand where they get the logic of their belief.idea.



* TheOathBreaker: Lucy's jilting her fiancé is treated with all the gravity that the era would regard it, even though Edward wants out.

to:

* TheOathBreaker: Lucy's jilting her fiancé is treated with all the gravity that with which the era would regard it, even though Edward wants out.



* OnlySaneMan: Elinor, as are most Creator/JaneAusten heroines.

to:

* OnlySaneMan: Elinor, as are like most Creator/JaneAusten heroines.



* SiblingYinYang; Repeatedly.

to:

* SiblingYinYang; SiblingYinYang: Repeatedly.
28th Oct '16 8:28:22 AM Leahnansidhe
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** Lucy Steele may be BookDumb, but she's a clever, focused social climber who knows how to keep a secret. Her older sister Nancy is an airhead.

to:

** Lucy Steele may be BookDumb, but she's a clever, focused social climber who knows how to keep a secret. Her older sister Nancy Anne is an airhead.
18th Sep '16 9:42:48 AM eowynjedi
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Added DiffLines:

* HopeIsScary: Having been told to prepare for the worst, Elinor tries to keep herself from being hopeful when Marianne's fever breaks, but she can't help it.
-->'' Hope had already entered; and feeling all its anxious flutter, she bent over her sister to watch—she hardly knew for what. ''
26th Aug '16 12:16:26 AM LadyNorbert
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* FirstNameBasis: A big deal in Georgian times. When Elinor overhears Marianne and Willoughby using each others' Christian names, she takes it as a sign that they're either engaged or as good as.

to:

* FirstNameBasis: A big deal in Georgian times. When Elinor overhears Marianne and Willoughby using each others' calling Marianne by her Christian names, name, she takes it as a sign that they're either engaged or as good as.



* {{Greed}}: Fanny Dashwood and, to a lesser extent, John. Seriously, they had an income about twelve times that of the other branch of the family, and John had given an effing promise to his dying father; they should have done ''something''.

to:

* {{Greed}}: Fanny Dashwood and, to a lesser extent, John. Seriously, they had have an income about twelve times that of the other branch of the family, and John had given an effing promise to his dying father; they should have done ''something''.



* INeedAFreakingDrink: Mrs. Jennings finds a bottle of good wine and recommends it as a treatment for Marianne's heartbreak. As Marianne is already asleep, Elinor asks if she can take it instead. After being horrified by Willoughby's actions and having to console Marianne the whole day, Elinor figures she'd do well to test its restorative powers on herself and downs "the greater part" as soon as the glass is in her hand.

to:

* INeedAFreakingDrink: Mrs. Jennings finds a bottle of good wine and recommends it as a treatment for Marianne's heartbreak. As Marianne is already asleep, Elinor asks if she can take drink it instead. After being horrified by Willoughby's actions and having to console Marianne the whole day, not to mention her own heartache over Edward's secret engagement, Elinor figures she'd do well to test its restorative powers on herself and downs "the greater part" as soon as the glass is in her hand.



* NobilityMarriesMoney: Willoughby marries Miss Grey. He's a gentleman (and a scoundrel) of a landed gentry with a mansion house called Combe Magna, and he will inherit another house from his elderly childless cousin, Mrs. Smith. However, he lives extravagantly and is deeply in debt. Miss Grey has a dowry of fifty thousand pounds, which makes her the wealthiest heiress in Creator/JaneAusten's 'verse. Her feelings for him are not entirely clear, but he is a fashionable, handsome man, and she wants to get married so she can part with her guardians with whom she didn't get along. Willoughby claims he loves Marianne Dashwood who is lovely, intelligent, passionate, but poor as a church mouse, and Miss Grey, being rather plain, is understandably jealous; however, it's unclear how true that is, since Willoughby's account is the only one the reader is given and he's not the most honest guy. They are not an ideal couple, but narrator says at the end of the book that they were not always unhappy together.

to:

* NobilityMarriesMoney: Willoughby marries Miss Grey. He's a gentleman (and a scoundrel) of a landed gentry with a mansion house called Combe Magna, and he will inherit another house from his elderly childless cousin, Mrs. Smith. However, he lives extravagantly and is deeply in debt. Miss Grey has a dowry of fifty thousand pounds, which makes her the wealthiest heiress in Creator/JaneAusten's 'verse. Her feelings for him are not entirely clear, but he is a fashionable, handsome man, and she wants to get married so she can part with her guardians with whom she didn't get along. Willoughby claims he loves Marianne Dashwood who is lovely, intelligent, passionate, but poor as a church mouse, and Miss Grey, being rather plain, is understandably jealous; however, it's unclear how true that is, since Willoughby's account is the only one the reader is given and he's not the most honest guy. They are not an ideal couple, but the narrator says at the end of the book that they were not always unhappy together.



* PassedOverInheritance: Mr. Dashwood effectively gets hit with this at the beginning of the book; his elderly uncle leaves the bulk of his estate not to Mr. Dashwood, but to his son John, because during his final illness the uncle became deeply attached to John's little boy Henry. John had already inherited everything of his mother's, so he was comfortably settled in the first place, and Mr. Dashwood intends to use his time as the master of Norland to set aside money for his wife and daughters. Unfortunately, he dies less than a year after his uncle, so all he can leave them is what he himself owned, which is very little compared to the Norland estate.



* ParentsAsPeople: Mrs. Dashwood is a kind and loving but [[CloudCuckooLander fallible]] character.

to:

* ParentsAsPeople: Mrs. Dashwood is a kind and loving but [[CloudCuckooLander fallible]] character. By the end of the book, she's come to recognize that her own attitude toward things has contributed toward Marianne's disappointment. She also realizes that she let herself be blinded by Elinor's consideration and stoic nature, and fears that she's been unkind to her elder daughter by not taking notice of her pain.
* PassedOverInheritance: Mr. Dashwood effectively gets hit with this at the beginning of the book; his elderly uncle leaves the bulk of his estate not to Mr. Dashwood, but to his son John, because during his final illness the uncle became deeply attached to John's little boy Henry. John had already inherited everything of his mother's, so he was comfortably settled in the first place, and Mr. Dashwood intends to use his time as the master of Norland to set aside money for his wife and daughters. Unfortunately, he dies less than a year after his uncle, so all he can leave them is what he himself owned, which is very little compared to the Norland estate.



* ''VideoGame/MatchesAndMatrimony'', a PC game which is composite adaptation of three Austen novels, including ''Sense and Sensibility''.

to:

* ''VideoGame/MatchesAndMatrimony'', a PC game which is a composite adaptation of three Austen novels, including ''Sense and Sensibility''.
18th Aug '16 4:00:55 PM LadyNorbert
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** Elinor. Though it's more I Want My Beloved to Behave in a Morally Upright Manner; after several conversations with Lucy, Elinor is perfectly certain that Edward will ''not'' be happy if he marries Lucy, due to Lucy's poor character and shallow, selfish personality. However, breaking an engagement was a very serious breach of trust in that time, so he still needs to go through with it. [[spoiler: She still gets him]].

to:

** Elinor. Though it's more I Want My Beloved to Behave in a Morally Upright Manner; after several conversations with Lucy, Elinor is perfectly certain that Edward will ''not'' be happy if he marries Lucy, due to Lucy's poor character and shallow, selfish personality. However, breaking an engagement was a very serious breach of trust in that time, so he still needs to go through with it. [[spoiler: She still gets him]].him.]]
** Edward himself is shown to be feeling this way when Elinor tells him that Colonel Brandon wants to give him the position of rector in the Delaford parish. The narrative is phrased in such a way that it's clear he thinks she was given the task of telling him because she's going to marry Colonel Brandon; he's dejected, but as he's engaged to Lucy, he certainly can't protest and so he just hopes for her happiness.



* JerkassFacade: Mr. Palmer behaves rudely or indifferently to everyone he meets in the belief that this makes him appear distinguished. Later on it's shown that he does love his family, especially his child, and he goes out of his way to be kind and polite to Marianne and Elinor when events go against them.

to:

* JerkassFacade: Mr. Palmer behaves rudely or indifferently to everyone he meets in the belief that this makes him appear distinguished. Later on it's shown that he does love his family, especially his child, baby son, and he goes out of his way to be kind and polite to Marianne and Elinor when events go against them.them. Once living in his house for the Easter holidays, Elinor is pleased to find that she likes him a lot more than she ever expected.



* MasterOfTheMixedMessage: Elinor meets Edward at the beginning of the novel, and they seem to hit it off, or at least Elinor's mother and sister think so. Elinor admits she likes him, but she says it's nothing serious because Edward never said he loved her and he never proposed to her. The reason for his mixed signals gets revealed soon. [[spoiler:Edward is involved in a dead-end relationship with Lucy Steele. He doesn't love her anymore, but considers his engagement binding]].

to:

* MasterOfTheMixedMessage: Elinor meets Edward at the beginning of the novel, and they seem to hit it off, or at least Elinor's mother and sister think so. Elinor admits she likes him, but she says it's nothing serious because Edward never said he loved her and he never proposed to her. The reason for his mixed signals gets revealed soon. [[spoiler:Edward is involved in a dead-end relationship with Lucy Steele. He doesn't love her anymore, but considers his engagement binding]].binding.]]



* NoNameGiven: A very minor example, but the sharp-eyed reader may pick up on the fact that the narrative explicitly states that Sir John and Lady Middleton have four noisy children. However, we are only ever introduced to John, William, and Annamaria. It's never even indicated whether the fourth child is a boy or a girl.

to:

* NoNameGiven: A very minor example, but the sharp-eyed reader may pick up on the fact that the narrative explicitly states that Sir John and Lady Middleton have four "four noisy children. children." However, we are only ever introduced to John, William, and Annamaria. It's never even indicated whether the fourth child is a boy or a girl.



* TheOathBreaker: Lucy's jilting her fiance is treated with all the gravity that the era would regard it, even though Edward wants out.

to:

* TheOathBreaker: Lucy's jilting her fiance fiancé is treated with all the gravity that the era would regard it, even though Edward wants out.



* PassedOverInheritance: Mr. Dashwood effectively gets hit with this at the beginning of the book; his elderly uncle leaves everything not to Mr. Dashwood, but to his son John, because during his final illness the uncle became deeply attached to John's little boy Henry. Because Mr. Dashwood dies so soon after his uncle, all he has to leave his wife and daughters is what he himself owned, which is very little compared to the Norland estate.
* PassiveAggressiveKombat: Elinor and Lucy Steele.

to:

* PassedOverInheritance: Mr. Dashwood effectively gets hit with this at the beginning of the book; his elderly uncle leaves everything the bulk of his estate not to Mr. Dashwood, but to his son John, because during his final illness the uncle became deeply attached to John's little boy Henry. Because John had already inherited everything of his mother's, so he was comfortably settled in the first place, and Mr. Dashwood intends to use his time as the master of Norland to set aside money for his wife and daughters. Unfortunately, he dies so soon less than a year after his uncle, so all he has to can leave his wife and daughters them is what he himself owned, which is very little compared to the Norland estate.
* PassiveAggressiveKombat: Elinor and Lucy Steele.
estate.



** It's clear that Marianne is her mother's favorite child; it's even explained in an early chapter that Mrs. Dashwood dotes on her because of her three daughters, Marianne is the most like herself. It's also implied that Mrs. Jennings favors Mrs. Palmer over Lady Middleton, for the same reason.

to:

** It's clear that Marianne is her mother's favorite child; it's even explained in an early chapter that Mrs. Dashwood dotes on her because of her three daughters, Marianne is the most like herself.
**
It's also implied that Mrs. Jennings favors Mrs. Palmer over Lady Middleton, for the same reason.



* ParentalMarriageVeto: Colonel Brandon and his childhood sweetheart Elizabeth were forcibly separated. Later, Edward's refusal to break off his engagement to Lucy causes his mother to disown him.

to:

* ParentalMarriageVeto: In the personal history he imparts to Elinor, Colonel Brandon and his childhood sweetheart Elizabeth were forcibly separated. separated.
**
Later, Edward's refusal to break off his engagement to Lucy causes his mother to disown him.



* PassiveAggressiveKombat: Elinor and Lucy Steele.



* PlotTriggeringDeath: Mr. Dashwood's death is what forces Elinor, Marianne, and their mother to seek a new home.

to:

* PlotTriggeringDeath: Mr. Dashwood's death is what forces Elinor, Marianne, his wife and their mother daughters to seek a new home.



* ShipperOnDeck: At one point half the cast seems to ship Elinor and Colonel Brandon. Elinor and Brandon... [[PlatonicLifePartners don't share their opinion]], although Elinor at least admits she can see where they get the idea.
* SiblingYinYang; Repeatedly:

to:

* ShipperOnDeck: At one point half the cast seems to ship Elinor and Colonel Brandon. Elinor and Brandon... [[PlatonicLifePartners don't share their opinion]], although Elinor at least admits she can see where they get the idea.
idea. She even admits to herself that if she didn't already know he's in love with Marianne, she would be persuaded to think he really does have a thing for her because they have such a great friendship.
* SiblingYinYang; Repeatedly:Repeatedly.



* StronglyWordedLetter: Elinor is unwilling to ask Marianne if she is engaged to Willoughby, fearing that her interference will be rejected. She decides that if things continue thus, she will write to her mother and "represent in the strongest manner [...] the necessity of some serious inquiry into the affair." (When she finally does make this plea, Mrs Dashwood largely ignores it and only asks Marianne to be more open with them.)

to:

* StronglyWordedLetter: Elinor is unwilling to ask Marianne if she is engaged to Willoughby, fearing that her interference will be rejected. She decides that if things continue thus, she will write to her mother and "represent in the strongest manner [...] the necessity of some serious inquiry into the affair." (When she finally does make this plea, Mrs Mrs. Dashwood largely ignores it and only asks Marianne to be more open with them.)



* WoundedGazelleGambit: Fanny, an excellent one. Miss Steele reveals Lucy's engagement. Fanny falls into violent hysterics and kicks them out of the house. Her husband's comment: "She has borne it all with the fortitude of an angel! She says she shall never think well of anybody again."

to:

* WoundedGazelleGambit: Fanny, Fanny pulls an excellent one. Miss Steele reveals Lucy's engagement. Fanny falls into violent hysterics and kicks them out of the house. Her husband's comment: "She has borne it all with the fortitude of an angel! She says she shall never think well of anybody again."
18th Aug '16 3:34:59 PM LadyNorbert
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* InformedAttribute: There are only a very few instances of Elinor and Edward's relationship being shown to the reader before it's explained that Elinor has fallen in love with him. We really aren't given any reason ''why'' she fell. In truth, the novel does a better job of showing the reader her relationship with Colonel Brandon, which makes it somewhat more understandable why a lot of the other characters ship the two of them. Both major film versions [[AdaptationExpansion go to great lengths to set up a more believable romance]] between Edward and Elinor.

to:

* InformedAttribute: InformedAttribute[=/=]DesignatedLoveInterest: There are only a very few instances of Elinor and Edward's relationship being shown to the reader before it's explained that Elinor has fallen in love with him. We really aren't given any reason ''why'' she fell.In fact, he isn't even introduced on the page before the narrative is explaining that Elinor's mother has observed an attachment growing between her daughter and the young man, and there's never a very concise explanation for why Elinor falls for him. In truth, the novel does a better job of showing the reader her relationship with Colonel Brandon, which makes it somewhat more understandable why a lot of the other characters ship the two of them. Both major film versions [[AdaptationExpansion go to great lengths to set up a more believable romance]] between Edward and Elinor.
9th May '16 1:47:32 AM XFllo
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* {{Kuudere}}: Oh, Elinor.
9th May '16 1:46:11 AM XFllo
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* CoolOldLady: Mrs. Jennings proves herself one of these when Marianne gets sick.
* DancesAndBalls: Sir John is fond of throwing these at his country estate, but only one they attend in London is of great significance to the plot.

to:

* CoolOldLady: Mrs. Jennings proves herself one of these when Marianne gets sick.
* DancesAndBalls: Sir John is fond of throwing these dancing parties at his country estate, but only one they attend in London is of great significance to the plot.
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