History Literature / RealmOfTheElderlings

18th Oct '17 10:33:19 PM McJeff
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* DarkSkinnedBlonde: The Chalcedeans as a race have a roughly Arabic skin tone, but sandy blonde hair and blue eyes.
11th Oct '17 5:26:56 AM Baeraad555
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* GoodOldWays: Just about every positive sentiment made is said to be a traditional value that is sadly getting less common in the degenerate modern age. Even flaws that would have been considered "traditional" in the real world, like chauvinism, are presented as being originally Chalcedan vices that have started to infect Bingtown.
29th Sep '17 3:39:48 AM Figaro
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* HarsherInHindsight: ''Fool's Fate'' reveals that [[spoiler:there is in fact a way to restore the souls of those who have been Forged: destroy the Stone Dragon into which their souls had been fed. Destroying the Pale Woman's dragon would presumably have restored many or most of those Forged during the Red Ship war; unfortunately they have all been [[MercyKill mercy killed]] in the intervening years.
29th Sep '17 3:38:16 AM Figaro
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* AmbiguousGender: In the ''Farseer'' trilogy there's the Fool, who the narrator Fitz believes is male. The ''Liveship Traders'' trilogy has a totally different dramatis personae, including the female Amber. It's never stated that these two are the same person, but more and more clues are dropped as the trilogy progresses, and because Amber advises Althea on how to disguise herself as a boy we start to think he/she is really female and was disguised as male in the earlier books. But in the ''Tawny Man'' trilogy, where we and Fitz are told outright that [[spoiler:both characters are the same person]], there's a section where [[spoiler:Fitz inhabits the Fool's body and can presumably tell what sex he/she is, but never tells us! Fitz implies that the Fool's kind are so different from humans that neither gender is appropriate -- but then there's the Pale Woman to account for, who is clearly female, leading to the conclusion that not all Whites are the same]]. This is in line with the Fool's claim that where he comes from, people don't insist on the existence of only two genders.

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* AmbiguousGender: In the ''Farseer'' trilogy there's the Fool, who the narrator Fitz believes is male. The [[spoiler:The ''Liveship Traders'' trilogy has a totally different dramatis personae, including the female Amber. It's never stated that these two are the same person, but more and more clues are dropped as the trilogy progresses, and because Amber advises Althea on how to disguise herself as a boy we start to think he/she is really female and was disguised as male in the earlier books. But in the ''Tawny Man'' trilogy, where we and Fitz are told outright that [[spoiler:both both characters are the same person]], person, there's a section where [[spoiler:Fitz Fitz inhabits the Fool's body and can presumably tell what sex he/she is, but never tells us! Fitz implies that the Fool's kind are so different from humans that neither gender is appropriate -- but then there's the Pale Woman to account for, who is clearly female, leading to the conclusion that not all Whites are the same]].same. This is in line with the Fool's claim that where he comes from, people don't insist on the existence of only two genders.]]



* MeaningfulName: Babies born in noble families are usually named after a virtue, in belief child assimilates said virtue as a crucial part of his/hers personality. Thus we have Lords Chivalry, Verity, Bright, Shrewd, Dutiful and Ladies Patience, Constance, Faith, Celerity and Grace, among others. [[spoiler:The characters who get a lot of screen time tend to both reflect and avert their names over the course of the series. For example, Chivalry commits adultery, but then gives up the throne as a personal penance. Shrewd is something of a [[ChessMaster cunning genius]] but is also completely blind to the plot against him being hatched under his very nose. Whilst not an outright liar, Verity tends to hide information even from his allies.]]
* MeaningfulRename: Thrice:

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* MeaningfulName: Babies born in noble families are usually named after a virtue, in belief child assimilates said virtue as a crucial part of his/hers personality. Thus we have Lords Chivalry, Verity, Bright, Shrewd, Dutiful and Ladies Patience, Constance, Faith, Celerity and Grace, among others. [[spoiler:The
**The
characters who get a lot of screen time tend to both reflect invoke and avert subvert their names over the course of the series. For example, in the backstory, Chivalry commits adultery, adultery and fathers a bastard son, but then gives up the throne as a personal penance. penance (despite the existence of [[spoiler:Chade]] establishing that this is not an automatic expectation for an heir who fathers a bastard. King Shrewd is something of a [[ChessMaster cunning genius]] but [[spoiler:but is also completely blind to the plot against him being hatched under his very nose. Whilst not an outright liar, Verity tends to hide information even from his allies.]]
**Regal is an in-universe example. As the current King's third son, really he should have no chance of becoming King himself, however his name makes no sense of his mother's ambitions for him.
**Nighteyes refers to Fitz as "Changer" [[spoiler:which invokes his status as the Fool's 'catalyst' who is destined to change history.]]
* MeaningfulRename: Thrice:Fitz is renamed thrice:


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* SpoilerCover: Many versions of the third book ''Assassin's Quest'' featured dragons on the cover, despite the fact their existence is not even hinted at in the first two books nor for the first few hundred pages of the third.


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* HarsherInHindsight: ''Fool's Fate'' reveals that [[spoiler:there is in fact a way to restore the souls of those who have been Forged: destroy the Stone Dragon into which their souls had been fed. Destroying the Pale Woman's dragon would presumably have restored many or most of those Forged during the Red Ship war; unfortunately they have all been [[MercyKill mercy killed]] in the intervening years.
7th Jul '17 4:52:48 AM Figaro
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* MeaningfulName: Babies born in noble families are usually named after a virtue, in belief child assimilates said virtue as a crucial part of his/hers personality. Thus we have Lords Chivalry, Verity, Bright, Shrewd, Dutiful and Ladies Patience, Constance, Faith, Celerity and Grace, among others.

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* MeaningfulName: Babies born in noble families are usually named after a virtue, in belief child assimilates said virtue as a crucial part of his/hers personality. Thus we have Lords Chivalry, Verity, Bright, Shrewd, Dutiful and Ladies Patience, Constance, Faith, Celerity and Grace, among others. [[spoiler:The characters who get a lot of screen time tend to both reflect and avert their names over the course of the series. For example, Chivalry commits adultery, but then gives up the throne as a personal penance. Shrewd is something of a [[ChessMaster cunning genius]] but is also completely blind to the plot against him being hatched under his very nose. Whilst not an outright liar, Verity tends to hide information even from his allies.]]
11th Jun '17 6:34:08 PM Fireblood
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* AnimalEyeSpy: Discussed. In the Six Duchies it is generally assumed that the Witted can see through animal eyes. That is not so. As Fitz and others point out, they cannot see through their bond animals' eyes, yet the idea that the Witted could be spying on them creeps many people out to such an extent that -- combined with other superstitions -- it's a direct cause of BurnTheWitch

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* AnimalEyeSpy: Discussed.{{Discussed}}. In the Six Duchies it is generally assumed that the Witted can see through animal eyes. That is not so. As Fitz and others point out, they cannot see through their bond animals' eyes, yet the idea that the Witted could be spying on them creeps many people out to such an extent that -- combined with other superstitions -- it's a direct cause of BurnTheWitchBurnTheWitch.
11th Jun '17 6:33:23 PM Fireblood
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Added DiffLines:

* AmbiguousGender: In the ''Farseer'' trilogy there's the Fool, who the narrator Fitz believes is male. The ''Liveship Traders'' trilogy has a totally different dramatis personae, including the female Amber. It's never stated that these two are the same person, but more and more clues are dropped as the trilogy progresses, and because Amber advises Althea on how to disguise herself as a boy we start to think he/she is really female and was disguised as male in the earlier books. But in the ''Tawny Man'' trilogy, where we and Fitz are told outright that [[spoiler:both characters are the same person]], there's a section where [[spoiler:Fitz inhabits the Fool's body and can presumably tell what sex he/she is, but never tells us! Fitz implies that the Fool's kind are so different from humans that neither gender is appropriate -- but then there's the Pale Woman to account for, who is clearly female, leading to the conclusion that not all Whites are the same]]. This is in line with the Fool's claim that where he comes from, people don't insist on the existence of only two genders.
7th Jun '17 2:25:58 PM PuffyTreat
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* FusionDance: [[spoiler: In ''Assassin's Fate'', Fitz is fatally wounded by the vile worms the Servants use to slowly devour and kill. Remembering Verity, he intends to Skill-carve himself a "dragon" in the form of a wolf, so that he and Nighteyes will be able to remain in the world of the living. But he and his long-dead wolf alone don't have enough memories to make it animate. Then the Fool joins them and all three end up merging into the Wolf of the West, fulfilling one of Bee's prophecies.]]


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* FusionDance: [[spoiler: In ''Assassin's Fate, Fitz is badly hurt by the vile worms the Servants use to weaken and slowly devour their enemies. Dying, his healing only barely able to match the worms' hunger, he decides to Skill-carve a "dragon" in the form of a wolf so that he and Nighteyes can remain in the world of the living. But they alone don't have enough memories to make it animate. Then the Fool joins them, the souls of all three melding together and bringing it to life as a whole being, the Wolf of the West.]]
7th Jun '17 2:19:37 PM PuffyTreat
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Added DiffLines:

* FusionDance: [[spoiler: In ''Assassin's Fate'', Fitz is fatally wounded by the vile worms the Servants use to slowly devour and kill. Remembering Verity, he intends to Skill-carve himself a "dragon" in the form of a wolf, so that he and Nighteyes will be able to remain in the world of the living. But he and his long-dead wolf alone don't have enough memories to make it animate. Then the Fool joins them and all three end up merging into the Wolf of the West, fulfilling one of Bee's prophecies.]]
5th Jun '17 12:34:47 PM tricksterson
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Third trilogy about Fitz, the third and last book of which is due in 2017.

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Third trilogy about Fitz, the third and last book of which is due in 2017.
Fitz
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.RealmOfTheElderlings