History Literature / PippiLongstocking

19th Aug '17 2:44:16 PM Ryan37352
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* UngratefulBastard: In the 1997 TV series episode, "Pippi Saves the Old Folk's Home," the town's arrogant chairman is unwilling to fix up the old folk's home even after Pippi saved his kids from a collapsing building, it's only after his wife threatens him that he changes his mind.
23rd Jul '17 4:28:47 PM creader
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* ObviouslyEvil: In the animated adpatation, Mrs. Prysselius is pretty much the BigBad who wants to send Pippi Longstocking off to a children's home. The lengths she goes to just to have Pippi put in the children's home are questionable. The only reason she relents at the end is because now that Pippi's father returned, that just took away her only justification for her goal, and had no choice but to fake a HeelFaceTurn.


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* RuleAbidingRebel: You'd think a child with [[BewareTheSuperman superhuman strength and a complete disregard for rules]] would be indiscriminately violent or even murderous, but she only gets into relatively innocent mischief. She was more rebellious in the original version of the book, which was published after Astrid Lindgren's death. It was given the title ''Ur-Pippi''.


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* TooDumbToLive: Kling and Klang, from the 1997 film, who obliviously oblige to give Blom and Dunder-Karlsson the tools they need to escape jail. They don't get any better from there... (neglecting their police duties just to go fishing, one has to wonder how they haven't been fired yet)
20th Jul '17 11:09:51 PM creader
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* {{Cloudcuckoolander}}: Pippi

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* {{Cloudcuckoolander}}: PippiPippi.
15th Jul '17 9:01:39 AM Ryan37352
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* DubNameChange: See UnfortunateNames below.

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* DubNameChange: See DubNameChange:
** Pippi Langstrump in Swedish to Pippi Longstocking in English (although "Langstrump" and "Longstocking" mean the same thing)
*** Also see
UnfortunateNames below.below.
** Some miscellaneous things and people gets this as well in certain adaptations.
7th Jul '17 10:28:26 AM TheTrailblazerCritic
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* PoliceAreUseless: Played straight in most adaptations; Kling and Klang from the 1997 animated film in particular embody this trope, being easily distracted from their work and even letting two criminals loose out of sheer gullibility.
5th May '17 5:08:05 PM Ryan37352
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** Mrs. Prysselius at the end of the 1997 film, she is given no comeuppance for the extreme methods that she took just to have Pippi put in the children's home.

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** Mrs. Prysselius at the end of the 1997 film, she is given no comeuppance for the extreme methods methods, such as threatening to have the police fired to outright kidnapping, that she took just to have Pippi put in the children's home.



** Not a villainous example, but the incompetent carpenter from the 25th episode of the 1997 TV series never get the idea that he's recklessly destroying personal belongings and property.

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** Not a villainous example, but the incompetent carpenter from the 25th episode of the 1997 TV series never get gets the idea that he's recklessly destroying personal belongings and property.
5th May '17 4:56:44 PM Ryan37352
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* PantyShot: Pippi occasionally gets this in the 1969 TV series and movies, and in the 1997 movie.
4th Apr '17 11:35:29 AM GGCrono
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The stories all revolve around the adventures of the eccentric young heroine Pippi. Her mother died when she was just a baby, so her father, Captain Efraim Longstocking, raised her as he travelled the world in his ship. When he was blown overboard in a storm Pippi was convinced that her father had survived and would one day come looking for her, so she moved into an old house (called Villa Villekulla) in a little Swedish village to wait for him. Besides a pet monkey and a horse Pippi lives alone, takes care of herself and keeps a suitcase full of gold pieces to pay for anything she might need. She quickly befriends her neighbors Tommy and Annika, who are both very normal kids in a very normal family. Pippi herself is highly unconventional, assertive, and [[SuperStrength inhumanly strong]], quite able to lift her horse one-handed without difficulty. She can also be instantly recognized by her distinctive red braids that stick straight out on either side of her head.

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The stories all revolve around the adventures of the eccentric young heroine Pippi. Her mother died when she was just a baby, so her father, Captain Efraim Longstocking, raised her as he travelled the world in his ship. When he was blown overboard in a storm Pippi was convinced that her father had survived and would one day come looking for her, so she moved into an old house (called Villa Villekulla) in a little Swedish village to wait for him. Besides a pet monkey and a horse horse, Pippi lives alone, takes care of herself and keeps a suitcase full of gold pieces to pay for anything she might need. She quickly befriends her neighbors Tommy and Annika, who are both very normal kids in a very normal family. Pippi herself is highly unconventional, assertive, and [[SuperStrength inhumanly strong]], quite able to lift her horse one-handed without difficulty. She can also be instantly recognized by her distinctive red braids that stick straight out on either side of her head.
25th Mar '17 2:43:54 PM themisterfree
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The ''Pippi Longstocking'' books have been adapted for TV and cinema several times. The adaptation that is probably most widely known is the 1969 TV series (a Swedish-West German co-production), which was also re-edited into four feature films. There is also an American live-action film from 1988 and a Canadian-German-Swedish {{animated adaptation}} from 1997.

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The ''Pippi Longstocking'' books have been adapted for TV and cinema several times. The adaptation that is probably most widely known is the 1969 TV series (a Swedish-West German co-production), which was also re-edited into four feature films. There is also an American live-action film from 1988 (produced by Creator/ColumbiaPictures) and a Canadian-German-Swedish {{animated adaptation}} (co-produced by Creator/{{Nelvana}}) from 1997.



** Mrs. Prysselius in the Nelvada animated movie and series. The original Mrs. Prysselius from the 1969 TV series was not an antagonist; she was extremely silly, extremely annoying and completely incapable of seeing the value of anything non-conventional, but she was always well-meaning and genuinely wanted what was best for Pippi. The animated version, while still not ''much'' of a villain, is a lot more openly antagonistic; her goal seems to be to get Pippi (and, really everyone else) to ''behave'' and ''conform'' and ''do as she's told,'' and is prepared to employ some rather dubious methods in order to reach her goals.

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** Mrs. Prysselius in the Nelvada Creator/{{Nelvana}} animated movie and series. The original Mrs. Prysselius from the 1969 TV series was not an antagonist; she was extremely silly, extremely annoying and completely incapable of seeing the value of anything non-conventional, but she was always well-meaning and genuinely wanted what was best for Pippi. The animated version, while still not ''much'' of a villain, is a lot more openly antagonistic; her goal seems to be to get Pippi (and, really everyone else) to ''behave'' and ''conform'' and ''do as she's told,'' and is prepared to employ some rather dubious methods in order to reach her goals.
1st Jan '17 7:37:10 PM Ryan37352
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* KarmaHoudini: Frequently in the 1997 TV film and animated series.
** Mrs. Prysselius at the end of the 1997 film, she is given no comeuppance for the extreme methods that she took just to have Pippi put in the children's home.
*** Although, the film's spin-off made Mrs. Prysselius less antagonistic, it still doesn't hesitate to drop karma on Mrs. Prysselius on the episodes where she is an antagonist.
** Downplayed with Jim and Buck from the third book and the 1997 TV series, even though they're humiliated by Pippi in the end, they still face no action from the law for their attempts to steal the pearls of Kurrekurredutt Island.
** The registrant of the ski race from the eighth episode of the 1997 TV series (see below at StrawMisogynist), gets no comeuppance for attempting to make Pippi lose by purposely stalling, and has the nerve to call her win disgraceful at the end, and is likely free to ruin other women's chances of winning the ski race.
** Not a villainous example, but the incompetent carpenter from the 25th episode of the 1997 TV series never get the idea that he's recklessly destroying personal belongings and property.
*** Although considering the last place he's seen in is ''Mrs. Prysselius's'' place doing what he does best, (destroying things that he believes he is fixing), he'll likely get a rude and angry one [[ExpositionCut offscreen]].
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