History Literature / PippiLongstocking

30th Sep '17 5:48:53 AM MLPAndFriendsComic301991
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* AmbiguousTimePeriod: The 1998 animated TV series, which is set in a quaint-looking village adhering to 1940s customs and architecture, but also contains dissonant elements to this (in episode 3, a couple with modern attire and a convertible which appears to be from at least {{TheEighties}} play a pivotal role in the episode searching for a house in the village), muddying the possibility of the show being set in any particular time period.

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* AmbiguousTimePeriod: The 1998 animated TV series, which is set in a quaint-looking village adhering to 1940s customs and architecture, but also contains dissonant elements to this (in episode 3, a couple with modern attire and a convertible which appears to be from at least {{TheEighties}} TheEighties play a pivotal role in the episode searching for a house in the village), muddying the possibility of the show being set in any particular time period.



* AnachronismStew: The 1997 animated movie and its accompanying TV series often tread into this (courtesy of their AmbiguousTimePeriod setting), but Blom and Dunder-Karlsson's IWantSong 'A Bowler and a New Gold Tooth' from the movie in particular stands out as an example of this. During the number, there's even a brief shot with Dunder-Karlsson (in his and Blom's fantasy, but still) dressed as a Manhattan hobo from [[TheEighties]].

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* AnachronismStew: The 1997 animated movie and its accompanying TV series often tread into this (courtesy of their AmbiguousTimePeriod setting), but Blom and Dunder-Karlsson's IWantSong 'A Bowler and a New Gold Tooth' from the movie in particular stands out as an example of this. During the number, there's even a brief shot with Dunder-Karlsson (in his and Blom's fantasy, but still) dressed as a Manhattan hobo from [[TheEighties]].TheEighties. As imagined by a fairly dim-witted criminal most likely having spent his entire life living in a quaint 1940s-style village.
30th Sep '17 5:46:42 AM MLPAndFriendsComic301991
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Added DiffLines:

*AmbiguousTimePeriod: The 1998 animated TV series, which is set in a quaint-looking village adhering to 1940s customs and architecture, but also contains dissonant elements to this (in episode 3, a couple with modern attire and a convertible which appears to be from at least {{TheEighties}} play a pivotal role in the episode searching for a house in the village), muddying the possibility of the show being set in any particular time period.


Added DiffLines:

*AnachronismStew: The 1997 animated movie and its accompanying TV series often tread into this (courtesy of their AmbiguousTimePeriod setting), but Blom and Dunder-Karlsson's IWantSong 'A Bowler and a New Gold Tooth' from the movie in particular stands out as an example of this. During the number, there's even a brief shot with Dunder-Karlsson (in his and Blom's fantasy, but still) dressed as a Manhattan hobo from [[TheEighties]].
30th Sep '17 5:33:39 AM MLPAndFriendsComic301991
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Added DiffLines:

* AnimationBump: While the 1997 animated movie has generally decent animation, during Blom and Dunder-Karlsson's [[IWantSong 'I Want' Song]] 'A Bowler and a New Gold Tooth', the animation quality suddenly takes an upturn, utilizing more fluent motion, ambitious cinematography and unusual lighting techniques than the rest of the film's animation.
21st Sep '17 8:42:30 AM Ryan37352
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* AdaptationDistillation: The 1969 Swedish TV series and its related movies take everything that was good about the books and crank it up to eleven, while removing just about everything that didn't work or was just pointless filler, resulting in a much tighter story structure that still left room for a fair amount of the spontaneous wackiness and [[SeinfeldianConversation surreal dialogue]] that are Pippi's trademarks. It's helped tremendously by tight scriptwriting and good actors (Inger Nilsson in the title role being the most prominent example). Astrid Lindgren herself was highly involved with this particular production, which explains why it's so much closer to the spirit of the books than its many successors.



* AdaptationDistillation: The 1969 Swedish TV series and its related movies take everything that was good about the books and crank it up to eleven, while removing just about everything that didn't work or was just pointless filler, resulting in a much tighter story structure that still left room for a fair amount of the spontaneous wackiness and [[SeinfeldianConversation surreal dialogue]] that are Pippi's trademarks. It's helped tremendously by tight scriptwriting and good actors (Inger Nilsson in the title role being the most prominent example). Astrid Lindgren herself was highly involved with this particular production, which explains why it's so much closer to the spirit of the books than its many successors.
21st Sep '17 8:41:34 AM Ryan37352
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* AluminumChristmasTrees: Swedish policemen were indeed armed with swords at the time the book was published. Until the 1960s, in fact.



* AluminumChristmasTrees: Swedish policemen were indeed armed with swords at the time the book was published. Until the 1960s, in fact.
20th Sep '17 10:28:26 AM Ryan37352
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** Not a villainous example, but the incompetent carpenter from the 25th episode of the 1997 TV series never gets the idea that he's recklessly destroying personal belongings and property.
*** Although considering the last place he's seen in is ''Mrs. Prysselius's'' place doing what he does best, (destroying things that he believes he is fixing), he'll likely get a rude and angry one [[ExpositionCut offscreen]].

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** Not a villainous example, but the incompetent carpenter from the 25th episode of the 1997 TV series never gets the idea that he's recklessly destroying personal belongings and property.
property (doesn't help that no one seems to be willing to break the news to him).
*** Although considering the last place he's seen in is ''Mrs. Prysselius's'' place place, doing what he does best, (destroying things that he believes he is fixing), he'll likely get brought down to reality in a rude and angry one manner [[ExpositionCut offscreen]].



* PoliceAreUseless: Played straight in most adaptations; Kling and Klang from the 1997 animated film in particular embody this trope, being easily distracted from their work and even letting two criminals loose out of sheer gullibility.

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** The third 1969-era movie is about Pippi and her friends traveling to an island of pirates to rescue Pippi's father.
* PoliceAreUseless: Played straight in most adaptations; Kling and Klang from the 1997 animated film in particular embody this trope, being easily distracted from their work work, actually having to be told to do something to get on with it, and even letting two criminals loose out of sheer gullibility.



* StrawMisogynist: The fine gentleman from the first chapter of the third book and the third episode of the 1997 TV series, who believes women don't understand business.
** Additionally, the registrant from the eighth episode of the 1997 TV series, as for him, the mere thought of a little girl winning a ski race is disgraceful, let along entering the race.

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* StrawMisogynist: This franchise has its own examples of misogynists.
**
The fine gentleman from the first chapter of the third book and the third episode of the 1997 TV series, who believes women don't understand business.
** Additionally, the registrant from the eighth episode of the 1997 TV series, as for him, the mere thought of a little girl winning a ski entering the race is disgraceful, let along entering alone winning a ski race.
*** Unfortunately, unlike
the race.fine gentleman above, the ski registrant [[KarmaHoudini manages to avoid karma's wrath]].



* WhatDoesSheSeeInHim: The woman in a pink suit from the 1997 TV series episode, "Pippi Doesn't Sell Her House." She is the girlfriend to the episode's main antagonist, who is a blatant sexist and hates children, and treats her like a slave. However unlike him, she is nice and friendly with children, especially Pippi. It's a wonder why she hasn't dumped him already.

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* WhatDoesSheSeeInHim: The woman in a pink suit from the 1997 TV series episode, "Pippi Doesn't Sell Her House." She is the girlfriend to the episode's main antagonist, who is a blatant sexist and sexist, hates children, and treats her like a slave. However unlike him, she is nice and friendly with children, especially Pippi. It's a wonder why she hasn't dumped him already.
19th Sep '17 10:24:30 AM Ryan37352
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* AluminumChristmasTrees: Swedish policemen were indeed armed with swords at the time the book was published. Until the 1960s, in fact.
* ArtEvolution: The illustrator, Louis S. Glanzman, steadily gets better with each book.
* ArtisticLicenseAnimalCare: Horses don't belong on verandas, or anyplace else with steps they could trip on.
* AscendedExtra: The two burglars, Blom and Dunder-Karlsson, only appear in one chapter in the original books, but go on to become major recurring characters in the 1969 TV series and later adaptations. Likewise, Kling and Klang, the two police officers were nameless minor characters in the books and got names and larger roles in the TV series.


Added DiffLines:

* AluminumChristmasTrees: Swedish policemen were indeed armed with swords at the time the book was published. Until the 1960s, in fact.
* ArtEvolution: The illustrator, Louis S. Glanzman, steadily gets better with each book.
* ArtisticLicenseAnimalCare: Horses don't belong on verandas, or anyplace else with steps they could trip on.
* AscendedExtra: The two burglars, Blom and Dunder-Karlsson, only appear in one chapter in the original books, but go on to become major recurring characters in the 1969 TV series and later adaptations. Likewise, Kling and Klang, the two police officers were nameless minor characters in the books and got names and larger roles in the TV series. Same with Willie, Bengt, and his lackeys who all only appeared in one chapter in the book series, now make at least two appearances in the 1999 animated TV series.
18th Sep '17 1:35:16 PM Ryan37352
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* UngratefulBastard: In the 1997 TV series episode, "Pippi Saves the Old Folk's Home," the town's arrogant chairman is unwilling to fix up the old folk's home even after Pippi saved his kids from a collapsing building, it's only after his wife threatens him that he changes his mind

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* UngratefulBastard: In the 1997 TV series episode, "Pippi Saves the Old Folk's Home," the town's arrogant chairman is unwilling to fix up the old folk's home even after Pippi saved his kids from a collapsing building, it's only after his wife threatens him that he changes his mindmind.
18th Sep '17 1:34:18 PM Ryan37352
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* TooDumbToLive: Kling and Klang, from the 1997 film, who obliviously oblige to give Blom and Dunder-Karlsson the tools they need to escape jail. They don't get any better from there... (neglecting their police duties just to go fishing, one has to wonder how they haven't been fired yet)

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* TooDumbToLive: Kling and Klang, the two policemen, from the 1997 film, who obliviously oblige to give Blom Bloom and Dunder-Karlsson Thunder-Karlsson the tools they need to escape jail. They don't get any better from there... (neglecting their police duties just to go fishing, one has to wonder how they haven't been fired yet)



* UngratefulBastard: In the 1997 TV series episode, "Pippi Saves the Old Folk's Home," the town's arrogant chairman is unwilling to fix up the old folk's home even after Pippi saved his kids from a collapsing building, it's only after his wife threatens him that he changes his mind.

to:

* UngratefulBastard: In the 1997 TV series episode, "Pippi Saves the Old Folk's Home," the town's arrogant chairman is unwilling to fix up the old folk's home even after Pippi saved his kids from a collapsing building, it's only after his wife threatens him that he changes his mind.mind
* WhatDoesSheSeeInHim: The woman in a pink suit from the 1997 TV series episode, "Pippi Doesn't Sell Her House." She is the girlfriend to the episode's main antagonist, who is a blatant sexist and hates children, and treats her like a slave. However unlike him, she is nice and friendly with children, especially Pippi. It's a wonder why she hasn't dumped him already.
22nd Aug '17 8:05:08 AM GrammarNavi
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* AnimatedAdaptation: The only studio to attempt it so far is {{Nelvana}}, the same studio that produced WesternAnimation/{{Care Bears|1980s}}. It started in 1997 as a movie musical, then spun off into a 26 episode TV series.

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* AnimatedAdaptation: The only studio to attempt it so far is {{Nelvana}}, Creator/{{Nelvana}}, the same studio that produced WesternAnimation/{{Care Bears|1980s}}. It started in 1997 as a movie musical, then spun off into a 26 episode TV series.



* DisneyAcidSequence: The {{Nelvana}} animated movie provides one during Blom and Dunder-Karlsson's IWantSong.

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* DisneyAcidSequence: The {{Nelvana}} Creator/{{Nelvana}} animated movie provides one during Blom and Dunder-Karlsson's IWantSong.
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