History Literature / PhilipMarlowe

22nd Sep '16 12:12:00 AM PaulA
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* 1953: ''Literature/TheLongGoodbye''



* TheAlcoholic: Roger Wade and Terry Lennox of ''The Long Goodbye''. Both are, interestingly, based on aspects of Chandler himself.
** Marlowe himself would be considered an alcoholic by today's standards.

to:

* TheAlcoholic: Roger Wade and Terry Lennox of ''The Long Goodbye''. Both are, interestingly, based on aspects of Chandler himself.
**
Marlowe himself would be considered an alcoholic by today's standards.



* BelligerentSexualTension: With Linda Loring in ''The Long Goodbye''.



* BluffTheImpostor: In ''The Long Goodbye'', when a woman is giving a confession that Marlowe doubts, she talks of dumping a man's body in a reservoir and Marlowe asks her how she got it over the fence. She blusters about adrenaline and then Marlowe reveals that there is no fence. After she breaks down he admits that he's never been there and really doesn't know about fence or no fence. He just thought she was lying.



* ChandlersLaw: Used several times, but usually with some kind of twist. In ''The Long Goodbye'', the man who comes through the door with the gun is a friend who's come to Marlowe for help. In ''The Lady in the Lake'', a ''woman'' comes through the door with a gun, and that's only the first of several twists.

to:

* ChandlersLaw: Used several times, but usually with some kind of twist. In ''The Long Goodbye'', the man who comes through the door with the gun is a friend who's come to Marlowe for help. In ''The Lady in the Lake'', a ''woman'' comes through the door with a gun, and that's only the first of several twists.



* MacGuffin:
** ''The High Window'' has Marlowe tracking down the Brasher Dubloon, a legendary coin worth a fortune that leaves a trail of dead thieves behind it; come the ending, it turns out [[spoiler:a minor character sold it for a new start with a clean slate]], but it's unimportant considering Marlowe uncovers a framing and a few murders in the process.
** ''The Long Goodbye'' has Marlowe's drinking buddy, Terry Lennox, fleeing the country and paying Marlowe with a $5000 bill. Marlowe, believing he hasn't earned the sum of cash, spends the entire plot refusing to spend it. [[spoiler:Its only significant uses are: to involve Marlowe in the second case; and so Marlowe can pay it back to Lennox, giving them an excuse to meet up again in the conclusion.]]

to:

* MacGuffin:
**
MacGuffin: ''The High Window'' has Marlowe tracking down the Brasher Dubloon, a legendary coin worth a fortune that leaves a trail of dead thieves behind it; come the ending, it turns out [[spoiler:a minor character sold it for a new start with a clean slate]], but it's unimportant considering Marlowe uncovers a framing and a few murders in the process.
** ''The Long Goodbye'' has Marlowe's drinking buddy, Terry Lennox, fleeing the country and paying Marlowe with a $5000 bill. Marlowe, believing he hasn't earned the sum of cash, spends the entire plot refusing to spend it. [[spoiler:Its only significant uses are: to involve Marlowe in the second case; and so Marlowe can pay it back to Lennox, giving them an excuse to meet up again in the conclusion.]]
process.



* ScrewPolitenessImASenior: Harlan Potter in ''The Long Goodbye''. It's practically in the stars that he eventually becomes [[spoiler: Marlowe's father-in-law....]]



* SpiritedYoungLady: Whenever Chandler gives the story a clear-cut heroine (as opposed to an ambiguous FemmeFatale or a DamselInDistress), she will be this. Linda Loring in ''The Long Goodbye'' is a refined, dignified heiress who matches Marlowe's [[SnarkToSnarkCombat snark with some of her own]], shares his KnightInSourArmor / [[DistaffCounterpart Princess In Sour Dress]] approach to the world, and helps him a little in the investigation.



* ZillionDollarBill: Marlowe receives a "portrait of Madison" (a $5,000 bill) for doing a small favor at the start of ''The Long Goodbye''. The bill causes no end of trouble.

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* ZillionDollarBill: Marlowe receives a "portrait of Madison" (a $5,000 bill) for doing a small favor at the start of ''The Long Goodbye''. The bill causes no end of trouble.
21st Sep '16 7:42:40 PM PaulA
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Marlowe features in the novels ''Literature/TheBigSleep'' (1939), ''Farewell, My Lovely'' (1940), ''The High Window'' (1942), ''The Lady in the Lake'' (1943), ''The Little Sister'' (1949), ''The Long Goodbye'' (1953), and ''Playback'' (1958).

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Marlowe features in the novels ''Literature/TheBigSleep'' ''The Big Sleep'' (1939), ''Farewell, My Lovely'' (1940), ''The High Window'' (1942), ''The Lady in the Lake'' (1943), ''The Little Sister'' (1949), ''The Long Goodbye'' (1953), and ''Playback'' (1958).




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* 1940: ''Literature/FarewellMyLovely''



* AffablyEvil: For much of the middle of ''Farewell My Lovely'', we hear about Laird Brunette, a gang boss who has the mayor and most of the city administration in his pocket. When Marlowe finally makes contact with Brunette, it turns out he has almost nothing to do with the case; he has bought the mayor, mainly because it's more efficient than paying off a bunch of different officials individually, but he just wants to keep his casino from being raided, and doesn't otherwise interfere in local affairs. He's actually sort of helpful to Marlowe.



* HiddenInPlainSight: ''Farewell, My Lovely'' contains a case where [[spoiler:Moose Malloy is looking for his red-haired sweetheart Velma, who either died or skipped town while he was in prison after being framed. Come the finale, it's revealed that Mrs. Grayle (Marlowe's employer for his second, seemingly irrelevant case) is actually a disguised Velma, and was responsible for framing Moose, murdering Lin Marriott, and attacking Marlowe previously; in other words, ''the book's damsel in distress was actually the villain disguised as the moll''.]]



* INeedAFreakingDrink: In ''Farewell, My Lovely'', Marlowe narrates:
-->I needed a drink, I needed a lot of life insurance, I needed a vacation, I needed a home in the country. What I had was a coat, a hat and a gun.



* LemonyNarrator: Marlowe both unconventionally describes people and isn't above LeaningOnTheFourthWall, as in this example from ''Farewell My Lovely'', when Marlowe wakes up on the ground after being knocked unconscious:
-->I got my chin scraped. It hurts. It feels scraped. That way I know it's scraped. No, I can't see it. I don't have to see it. It's my chin and I know whether it's scraped or not. Maybe you want to make something of it? Okay, shut up and let me think.

to:

* LemonyNarrator: Marlowe both unconventionally describes people and isn't above LeaningOnTheFourthWall, as in this example from ''Farewell My Lovely'', when Marlowe wakes up on the ground after being knocked unconscious:
-->I got my chin scraped. It hurts. It feels scraped. That way I know it's scraped. No, I can't see it. I don't have to see it. It's my chin and I know whether it's scraped or not. Maybe you want to make something of it? Okay, shut up and let me think.
LeaningOnTheFourthWall.






* PaintingTheMedium: Since all the Marlowe stories are narrated in the first person, Marlowe's mood and mental condition affect the tone of the writing. This is usually very subtle, but there's a passage in ''Farewell, My Lovely'' where Marlowe regains consciousness after an involuntary, days-long binge on needle drugs. The narration is downright surreal for a few chapters...to the point where he seems to be ''[[LeaningOnTheFourthWall talking to the reader]]''!



* PurpleEyes: A young man known only as 'Red' in ''Farewell, My Lovely'' has violet eyes. Marlowe describes them as "the eyes you never see, that you only read about."



* SpiritedYoungLady: Whenever Chandler gives the story a clear-cut heroine (as opposed to an ambiguous FemmeFatale or a DamselInDistress), she will be this. Most notably, Anne Riordan in ''Farewell, My Lovely'' and Linda Loring in ''The Long Goodbye''. Anne is a noble, sweet-natured [[BettyAndVeronica Betty to the]] FemmeFatale's [[BettyAndVeronica Veronica,]] but is also an IntrepidReporter and the daughter of a cop. Linda is a refined, dignified heiress who matches Marlowe's [[SnarkToSnarkCombat snark with some of her own]], shares his KnightInSourArmor / [[DistaffCounterpart Princess In Sour Dress]] approach to the world, and helps him a little in the investigation.
* TheStoic: Though Marlowe does have his more human moments, these mainly occur when he's been truly pushed over the edge, as when, in one novel, he is kidnapped and shot full of narcotics by a quack doctor. The rest of the time, though, he manages to remain completely deadpan even as he's being beaten up by crooked cops or having guns waved in his face.

to:

* SpiritedYoungLady: Whenever Chandler gives the story a clear-cut heroine (as opposed to an ambiguous FemmeFatale or a DamselInDistress), she will be this. Most notably, Anne Riordan in ''Farewell, My Lovely'' and Linda Loring in ''The Long Goodbye''. Anne is a noble, sweet-natured [[BettyAndVeronica Betty to the]] FemmeFatale's [[BettyAndVeronica Veronica,]] but is also an IntrepidReporter and the daughter of a cop. Linda Goodbye'' is a refined, dignified heiress who matches Marlowe's [[SnarkToSnarkCombat snark with some of her own]], shares his KnightInSourArmor / [[DistaffCounterpart Princess In Sour Dress]] approach to the world, and helps him a little in the investigation.
* TheStoic: Though Marlowe does have his more human moments, these mainly occur when he's been truly pushed over the edge, as when, in one novel, he is kidnapped and shot full of narcotics by a quack doctor.edge. The rest of the time, though, he manages to remain completely deadpan even as he's being beaten up by crooked cops or having guns waved in his face.



* TakeThat: Quite a few of his insults are subtle jabs, sometimes at real people; for example, when a {{mook}} feels the need to repeat everything back at him, he starts referring to him as [[Creator/ErnestHemingway Hemingway]]:
-->'''Mook''': (confused) Who is this Hemingway person at all?\\
'''Marlowe''': A guy who keeps saying the same thing over and over until you begin to believe it must be good.



* TontoTalk: In ''Farewell My Lovely'', a {{Mook}} named Second Planting shows up and engages in this. [[DefiedTrope Marlowe doesn't buy it for a minute, finally telling him to "Skip the pig Latin".]] The mook's English improves, indicating he ''was'' faking most of it, but it's still a little broken.
21st Sep '16 7:12:57 PM PaulA
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* FixupNovel: The first four Marlowe novels are patched together out of short stories.


Added DiffLines:

* SelfPlagiarism: The first four Marlowe novels are patched together out of Dalmas and Carmady short stories, with bits rearranged, merged, split and/or renamed.
21st Sep '16 6:32:57 PM PaulA
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* BelligerentSexualTension: With Vivian Sternwood in ''Literature/TheBigSleep'', and with Linda Loring in ''The Long Goodbye''. (The latter is only in the book.)

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* BelligerentSexualTension: With Vivian Sternwood in ''Literature/TheBigSleep'', and with Linda Loring in ''The Long Goodbye''. (The latter is only in the book.)Goodbye''.
21st Sep '16 2:28:10 AM PaulA
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* AluminumChristmasTrees: As discussed in [[http://onlyagame.wbur.org/2014/12/27/best-of-raymond-chandler-baseball this article]], ''The High Window'' contains a puzzling-to-modern-readers reference to synthetic crowd noise at a Dodgers game broadcast on the radio, particularly given that the novel is set in California and was written well before the Dodgers left Brooklyn. As the article explains, between the 1920s and the 1950s there was an industry in re-creating baseball games for same-day delay broadcasts, and sportscasters would mimic details such as crowd sounds and the noise of the bat in order to provide listeners with a realistic experience.



* BluffTheImpostor: In ''The Long Goodbye'', when a woman is giving a confession that Marlowe doubts, she talks of dumping a man's body in a reservoir and Marlowe asks her how she got it over the fence. She blusters about adrenaline and then Marlowe reveals that there is no fence. After she breaks down he admits that he's never been there and really doesn't know about fence or no fence. He just thought she was lying.



* ChandlersLaw: Used several times, but usually with some kind of twist. In ''The Long Goodbye'', the man who comes through the door with the gun is a friend who's come to Marlowe for help. In ''The Lady in the Lake'', a ''woman'' comes through the door with a gun, and that's only the first of several twists.



* EvilGloating: Lampshaded in ''The Lady in the Lake''.
-->"I've never liked this scene," I said. "Detective confronts murderer. Murderer produces gun, points same at detective. Murderer tells detective the whole sad story, with the idea of shooting him at the end of it. Thus wasting a lot of valuable time, even if in the end murderer did shoot detective. Only murderer never does. Something always happens to prevent it. The gods don't like this scene either. They always manage to spoil it."



* HiddenInPlainSight: ''Farewell, My Lovely'' contains a case where [[spoiler:Moose Malloy is looking for his red-haired sweetheart Velma, who either died or skipped town while he was in prison after being framed. Come the finale, it's revealed that Mrs. Grayle (Marlowe's employer for his second, seemingly irrelevant case) is actually a disguised Velma, and was responsible for framing Moose, murdering Lin Marriott, and attacking Marlowe previously; in other words, ''the book's damsel in distress was actually the villain disguised as the moll''.]]



* IWasNeverHere: In ''The Little Sister'', a telephone conversation ends with this trope.
-->'''Gonzalez:''' One moment, you have not told me what happened.\\
'''Marlowe:''' I haven't even telephoned you.




* MacGuffin:
** ''The High Window'' has Marlowe tracking down the Brasher Dubloon, a legendary coin worth a fortune that leaves a trail of dead thieves behind it; come the ending, it turns out [[spoiler:a minor character sold it for a new start with a clean slate]], but it's unimportant considering Marlowe uncovers a framing and a few murders in the process.
** ''The Long Goodbye'' has Marlowe's drinking buddy, Terry Lennox, fleeing the country and paying Marlowe with a $5000 bill. Marlowe, believing he hasn't earned the sum of cash, spends the entire plot refusing to spend it. [[spoiler:Its only significant uses are: to involve Marlowe in the second case; and so Marlowe can pay it back to Lennox, giving them an excuse to meet up again in the conclusion.]]



* NothingIsScarier: In ''The Little Sister'', the series takes an unusual turn when the conclusion has Marlowe investigating an isolated estate on a private road. The lack of traffic or people makes it eerily quiet as it is, but then even Marlowe himself suddenly announces something seems off.
-->[The living room] was curtained and quite dark, but it had the feel of great size. The darkness was heavy in it and my nose twitched at a lingering odor that said somebody had been there not too long ago. I stopped breathing and listened. Tigers could be in the darkness watching me. Or guys with large guns, standing flat-footed, breathing softly with their mouths open. ''Or nothing and nobody and too much imagination in the wrong place.''



* PinkElephants: In chapter 18 of ''The Lady in the Lake'', a character refers to a doctor "who ran around all night with a case of loaded hypodermic needles, keeping the fast set from having pink elephants for breakfast."



* PurpleEyes: A young man known only as 'Red' in ''Farewell, My Lovely'' has violet eyes. Marlowe describes them as "the eyes you never see, that you only read about."



* ShapedLikeItself: From ''The Lady in the Lake'':
-->''She jerked away from me like a startled fawn might, if I had a startled fawn and it jerked away from me.''



* BadassInANiceSuit: The title character aside, there is Winslow Wong in the 1969 version. When Marlowe refuses his Bribe, [[PersonOfMassDestruction Winslow tears apart his office with his bare hands.]] It helps that Wong is played by BruceLee prior to his Hong Kong action films.

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* ArtisticLicenseGunSafety: In ''Marlowe'' (1969), Philip Marlowe, at the scene of a murder, checks that a gun has been fired by putting the muzzle under his nose and smelling it. Yes, his finger isn't on the trigger, but he certainly should know better.
* BadassInANiceSuit: The title character aside, there is Winslow Wong in the 1969 version. When Marlowe refuses his Bribe, [[PersonOfMassDestruction Winslow tears apart his office with his bare hands.]] It helps that Wong is played by BruceLee Creator/BruceLee prior to his Hong Kong action films.
12th Jul '16 6:14:41 PM Rockduded
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* TheAlcoholic: Roger Wade and Terry Lennox of ''The Long Goodbye''. Both are, interestingly, based on aspects of Chandler himself

to:

* TheAlcoholic: Roger Wade and Terry Lennox of ''The Long Goodbye''. Both are, interestingly, based on aspects of Chandler himselfhimself.
** Marlowe himself would be considered an alcoholic by today's standards.
1st Jul '16 12:20:14 PM Anddrix
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* OfficialCouple: With Linda Loring, once he meets her in ''The Long Goodbye''. Chandler specifically created the character to be the perfect match for a man like Marlowe (a sort of "Princess In Sour Dress" to his KnightInSourArmor). Appropriately enough, she's the first woman we ever "see" Marlowe in bed with. She appears again in the final scene of ''Playback'' (the next novel and Chandler's last finished one), and the unfinished ''The Poodle Springs Story'' ([[PosthumousCollaboration which Robert B. Parker finished,]] [[BaseBreaker to dubious response]]).

to:

* OfficialCouple: With Linda Loring, once he meets her in ''The Long Goodbye''. Chandler specifically created the character to be the perfect match for a man like Marlowe (a sort of "Princess In Sour Dress" to his KnightInSourArmor). Appropriately enough, she's the first woman we ever "see" Marlowe in bed with. She appears again in the final scene of ''Playback'' (the next novel and Chandler's last finished one), and the unfinished ''The Poodle Springs Story'' ([[PosthumousCollaboration which Robert B. Parker finished,]] [[BaseBreaker to dubious response]]).response).
10th May '16 12:16:28 AM PaulA
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* 1969: ''Marlowe''. Marlowe is played by James Garner.



[[AC: LiveActionTV]]
* 1983: ''Phillip Marlowe: Private Eye'': Starring Creators/PowersBooth. HBO-produced short TV series, two seasons of 6 episodes each.
9th May '16 4:46:12 PM ScrewySqrl
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[[AC: LiveActionTelevison]]

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[[AC: LiveActionTelevison]] LiveActionTV]]
9th May '16 4:45:44 PM ScrewySqrl
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Added DiffLines:


[[AC: LiveActionTelevison]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.PhilipMarlowe