History Literature / PhilipMarlowe

7th Mar '16 6:31:37 PM PaulA
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* AffablyEvil: For much of the middle of ''Farewell My Lovely,'' we hear about Laird Brunette, a gang boss who has the mayor and most of the city administration in his pocket. When Marlowe finally makes contact with Brunette, it turns out he has almost nothing to do with the case; he has bought the mayor, mainly because itís more efficient than paying off a bunch of different officials individually, but he just wants to keep his casino from being raided, and doesnít otherwise interfere in local affairs. He's actually sort of helpful to Marlowe.

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* AffablyEvil: For much of the middle of ''Farewell My Lovely,'' Lovely'', we hear about Laird Brunette, a gang boss who has the mayor and most of the city administration in his pocket. When Marlowe finally makes contact with Brunette, it turns out he has almost nothing to do with the case; he has bought the mayor, mainly because itís it's more efficient than paying off a bunch of different officials individually, but he just wants to keep his casino from being raided, and doesnít doesn't otherwise interfere in local affairs. He's actually sort of helpful to Marlowe.



* [[BadassLongcoat Badass Trenchcoat]]

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* [[BadassLongcoat Badass Trenchcoat]]%%* BadassLongcoat



* {{Fixup Novel}}s: the first ''four'' Marlowe novels!

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* {{Fixup Novel}}s: the FixupNovel: The first ''four'' four Marlowe novels!novels are patched together out of short stories.
7th Mar '16 6:29:47 PM PaulA
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* AccidentalTruth: In one book, intending to express his lack of interest in a case, Marlowe tells a random person that he couldn't care less if they were a previously mentioned long-disappeared killer. This causes most of the book's plot as they mistakenly assume he knows their secret. Quite a lot of Marlowe's cases follow this pattern -- he's hired to do something relatively straightforward (negotiate with a blackmailer, mind a missing woman) and as soon as he begins asking questions, everybody in the neighbourhood with a dirty secret assumes he's after them and starts threatening him. Then, of course, he *has* to investigate them, just in case they're connected to his case. On this site MinorCrimeRevealsMajorPlot is a trope - for Marlowe, it's a lifestyle.

to:

* AccidentalTruth: In one book, intending to express his lack of interest in a case, Marlowe tells a random person that he couldn't care less if they were a previously mentioned long-disappeared killer. This causes most of the book's plot as they mistakenly assume he knows their secret. Quite a lot of Marlowe's cases follow this pattern -- he's hired to do something relatively straightforward (negotiate with a blackmailer, mind a missing woman) and as soon as he begins asking questions, everybody in the neighbourhood with a dirty secret assumes he's after them and starts threatening him. Then, of course, he *has* to investigate them, just in case they're connected to his case. On this site MinorCrimeRevealsMajorPlot is a trope - for Marlowe, it's a lifestyle.


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* MinorCrimeRevealsMajorPlot: Quite a lot of Marlowe's cases follow this pattern -- he's hired to do something relatively straightforward (negotiate with a blackmailer, mind a missing woman) and as soon as he begins asking questions, everybody in the neighbourhood with a dirty secret assumes he's after them and starts threatening him. Then, of course, he ''has'' to investigate them, just in case they're connected to his case.
7th Mar '16 6:02:59 PM moon_custafer
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* AccidentalTruth: In one book, intending to express his lack of interest in a case, Marlowe tells a random person that he couldn't care less if they were a previously mentioned long-disappeared killer. This causes most of the book's plot as they mistakenly assume he knows their secret. Quite a lot of Marlowe's cases follow this pattern -- he's hired to do something relatively straightforward (negotiate with a blackmailer, mind a missing woman) and as soon as he begins asking questions, everybody in the neighbourhood with a dirty secret assumes he's after them and starts threatening him. Then, of course, he *has* to investigate them, just in case they're connected to his case.

to:

* AccidentalTruth: In one book, intending to express his lack of interest in a case, Marlowe tells a random person that he couldn't care less if they were a previously mentioned long-disappeared killer. This causes most of the book's plot as they mistakenly assume he knows their secret. Quite a lot of Marlowe's cases follow this pattern -- he's hired to do something relatively straightforward (negotiate with a blackmailer, mind a missing woman) and as soon as he begins asking questions, everybody in the neighbourhood with a dirty secret assumes he's after them and starts threatening him. Then, of course, he *has* to investigate them, just in case they're connected to his case. On this site MinorCrimeRevealsMajorPlot is a trope - for Marlowe, it's a lifestyle.
7th Mar '16 5:57:11 PM moon_custafer
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* AffableEvil: For much of the middle of ''Farewell My Lovely,'' we hear about Laird Brunette, a gang boss who has the mayor and most of the city administration in his pocket. When Marlowe finally makes contact with Brunette, it turns out he has almost nothing to do with the case; he has bought the mayor, mainly because itís more efficient than paying off a bunch of different officials individually, but he just wants to keep his casino from being raided, and doesnít otherwise interfere in local affairs. He's actually sort of helpful to Marlowe.

to:

* AffableEvil: AffablyEvil: For much of the middle of ''Farewell My Lovely,'' we hear about Laird Brunette, a gang boss who has the mayor and most of the city administration in his pocket. When Marlowe finally makes contact with Brunette, it turns out he has almost nothing to do with the case; he has bought the mayor, mainly because itís more efficient than paying off a bunch of different officials individually, but he just wants to keep his casino from being raided, and doesnít otherwise interfere in local affairs. He's actually sort of helpful to Marlowe.
7th Mar '16 5:56:21 PM moon_custafer
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* Affable Evil: For much of the middle of ''Farewell My Lovely,'' we hear about Laird Brunette, a gang boss who has the mayor and most of the city administration in his pocket. When Marlowe finally makes contact with Brunette, it turns out he has almost nothing to do with the case; he has bought the mayor, mainly because itís more efficient than paying off a bunch of different officials individually, but he just wants to keep his casino from being raided, and doesnít otherwise interfere in local affairs. He's actually sort of helpful to Marlowe.

to:

* Affable Evil: AffableEvil: For much of the middle of ''Farewell My Lovely,'' we hear about Laird Brunette, a gang boss who has the mayor and most of the city administration in his pocket. When Marlowe finally makes contact with Brunette, it turns out he has almost nothing to do with the case; he has bought the mayor, mainly because itís more efficient than paying off a bunch of different officials individually, but he just wants to keep his casino from being raided, and doesnít otherwise interfere in local affairs. He's actually sort of helpful to Marlowe.
7th Mar '16 5:55:13 PM moon_custafer
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Added DiffLines:

* Affable Evil: For much of the middle of ''Farewell My Lovely,'' we hear about Laird Brunette, a gang boss who has the mayor and most of the city administration in his pocket. When Marlowe finally makes contact with Brunette, it turns out he has almost nothing to do with the case; he has bought the mayor, mainly because itís more efficient than paying off a bunch of different officials individually, but he just wants to keep his casino from being raided, and doesnít otherwise interfere in local affairs. He's actually sort of helpful to Marlowe.
7th Mar '16 5:44:02 PM moon_custafer
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* AccidentalTruth: In one book, intending to express his lack of interest in a case, Marlowe tells a random person that he couldn't care less if they were a previously mentioned long-disappeared killer. This causes most of the book's plot as they mistakenly assume he knows their secret.

to:

* AccidentalTruth: In one book, intending to express his lack of interest in a case, Marlowe tells a random person that he couldn't care less if they were a previously mentioned long-disappeared killer. This causes most of the book's plot as they mistakenly assume he knows their secret. Quite a lot of Marlowe's cases follow this pattern -- he's hired to do something relatively straightforward (negotiate with a blackmailer, mind a missing woman) and as soon as he begins asking questions, everybody in the neighbourhood with a dirty secret assumes he's after them and starts threatening him. Then, of course, he *has* to investigate them, just in case they're connected to his case.
8th Oct '15 8:51:56 PM maxwellsilver
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* LoveMakesYouEvil: ''The Little Sister''.
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24th Sep '15 6:21:48 PM RushLimborg
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* TontoTalk: In ''Farewell My Lovely'', a {{Mook}} named Second Planting shows up and engages in this. [[DefiedTrope Marlowe doesn't buy it for a minute, finally telling him to "Skip the pig Latin".]] The mook's English improves, indicating he ''was'' faking most of it, but it's still a little broken.
1st Sep '15 5:58:24 PM RushLimborg
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* OfficialCouple: With Linda Loring, once he meets her in ''The Long Goodbye''. Chandler specifically created the character to be the perfect match for a man like Marlowe (a sort of "Princess In Sour Dress" to his KnightInSourArmor). Appropriately enough, she's the first woman we ever "see" Marlowe in bed with.

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* OfficialCouple: With Linda Loring, once he meets her in ''The Long Goodbye''. Chandler specifically created the character to be the perfect match for a man like Marlowe (a sort of "Princess In Sour Dress" to his KnightInSourArmor). Appropriately enough, she's the first woman we ever "see" Marlowe in bed with. She appears again in the final scene of ''Playback'' (the next novel and Chandler's last finished one), and the unfinished ''The Poodle Springs Story'' ([[PosthumousCollaboration which Robert B. Parker finished,]] [[BaseBreaker to dubious response]]).



* SpiritedYoungLady: Whenever Chandler gives the story a clear-cut heroine (as opposed to an ambiguous FemmeFatale or DamselInDistress), she will be this. Most notably, Anne Riordan in ''Farewell, My Lovely'' and Linda Loring in ''The Long Goodbye''. Anne is a noble, sweet-natured [[BettyAndVeronica Betty to the]] FemmeFatale's [[BettyAndVeronica Veronica,]] but is also an IntrepidReporter and the daughter of a cop. Linda is a refined, dignified heiress who matches Marlowe's [[SnarkToSnarkCombat snark with some of her own]], shares his KnightInSourArmor / [[DistaffCounterpart Princess In Sour Dress]] approach to the world, and helps him a little in the investigation.

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* SpiritedYoungLady: Whenever Chandler gives the story a clear-cut heroine (as opposed to an ambiguous FemmeFatale or a DamselInDistress), she will be this. Most notably, Anne Riordan in ''Farewell, My Lovely'' and Linda Loring in ''The Long Goodbye''. Anne is a noble, sweet-natured [[BettyAndVeronica Betty to the]] FemmeFatale's [[BettyAndVeronica Veronica,]] but is also an IntrepidReporter and the daughter of a cop. Linda is a refined, dignified heiress who matches Marlowe's [[SnarkToSnarkCombat snark with some of her own]], shares his KnightInSourArmor / [[DistaffCounterpart Princess In Sour Dress]] approach to the world, and helps him a little in the investigation.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.PhilipMarlowe