History Literature / PeterPan

4th Sep '17 12:37:24 AM Luppercus
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* VillainExclusivityClause: Captain Hook is the main villain in all adaptations [[spoiler:and the official sequel]].
27th Jun '17 6:33:31 PM name_already_chosen
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* SympatheticVillain: The novel PeterAndWendy states that Captain Hook and his crew had been successful pirates until Peter Pan decided it would be fun to fight some pirates, [[YouCantGoHomeAgain drawing them to Neverland and then trapping them]]. The novel suggests that Captain Hook believes he will never be able to escape Neverland or his life as the DesignatedVillain of Peter Pan's adventures until he kills Peter Pan, providing him with a sympathetic motivation for his hatred.
27th Jun '17 6:12:57 PM name_already_chosen
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The [[Theatre/PeterPan original play]] is fairly [[{{Disneyfication}} Child-Friendly]]: Captain Hook is a [[BigHam blustering]] [[HarmlessVillain comic villain]], the violence is usually [[ThePratfall a pratfall]] or similar form of {{Slapstick}}, and death is treated more like a time-out (in the famous 1954 version with Mary Martin, every pirate Hook kills lies dead on the floor for a few minutes, then gets up again and joins in the pirate crowd scenes without comment). In contrast, the [[Literature/PeterAndWendy book version]] later written by Sir James M. Barrie is a [[Satire sly]] {{Deconstruction}} of the [[ChildrenAreInnocent Victorian notion of the sacred innocence]] of [[ChildrenAreCruel children]], full of ParentalBonus [[BlackComedy dark humor]] and subtle GallowsHumor; Barrie was a master satirist for his time, though few of his satires are remembered today.

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The [[Theatre/PeterPan original play]] is fairly [[{{Disneyfication}} Child-Friendly]]: Captain Hook is a [[BigHam blustering]] [[HarmlessVillain comic villain]], the violence is usually [[ThePratfall a pratfall]] or similar form of {{Slapstick}}, and death is treated more like a time-out (in the famous 1954 version with Mary Martin, every pirate Hook kills lies dead on the floor for a few minutes, then gets up again and joins in the pirate crowd scenes without comment). In contrast, the [[Literature/PeterAndWendy book version]] later written by Sir James M. Barrie is a [[Satire [[{{Satire}} sly]] {{Deconstruction}} of the [[ChildrenAreInnocent Victorian notion of the sacred innocence]] of [[ChildrenAreCruel children]], full of ParentalBonus [[BlackComedy dark humor]] and subtle GallowsHumor; Barrie was a master satirist for his time, though few of his satires are remembered today.
27th Jun '17 6:12:30 PM name_already_chosen
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The [[Theatre/PeterPan original play]] is fairly [[Disneyfication Child-Friendly]]: Captain Hook is a [[BigHam blustering]] [[HarmlessVillain comic villain]], the violence is usually [[ThePratfall a pratfall]] or similar form of {{Slapstick}}, and death is treated more like a time-out (in the famous 1954 version with Mary Martin, every pirate Hook kills lies dead on the floor for a few minutes, then gets up again and joins in the pirate crowd scenes without comment). In contrast, the [[Literature/PeterAndWendy book version]] later written by Sir James M. Barrie is a [[Satire sly]] {{Deconstruction}} of the [[ChildrenAreInnocent Victorian notion of the sacred innocence]] of [[ChildrenAreCruel children]], full of ParentalBonus [[BlackComedy dark humor] and subtle GallowsHumor; Barrie was a master satirist for his time, though few of his satires are remembered today.

to:

The [[Theatre/PeterPan original play]] is fairly [[Disneyfication [[{{Disneyfication}} Child-Friendly]]: Captain Hook is a [[BigHam blustering]] [[HarmlessVillain comic villain]], the violence is usually [[ThePratfall a pratfall]] or similar form of {{Slapstick}}, and death is treated more like a time-out (in the famous 1954 version with Mary Martin, every pirate Hook kills lies dead on the floor for a few minutes, then gets up again and joins in the pirate crowd scenes without comment). In contrast, the [[Literature/PeterAndWendy book version]] later written by Sir James M. Barrie is a [[Satire sly]] {{Deconstruction}} of the [[ChildrenAreInnocent Victorian notion of the sacred innocence]] of [[ChildrenAreCruel children]], full of ParentalBonus [[BlackComedy dark humor] humor]] and subtle GallowsHumor; Barrie was a master satirist for his time, though few of his satires are remembered today.
27th Jun '17 6:11:25 PM name_already_chosen
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Added DiffLines:

The [[Theatre/PeterPan original play]] is fairly [[Disneyfication Child-Friendly]]: Captain Hook is a [[BigHam blustering]] [[HarmlessVillain comic villain]], the violence is usually [[ThePratfall a pratfall]] or similar form of {{Slapstick}}, and death is treated more like a time-out (in the famous 1954 version with Mary Martin, every pirate Hook kills lies dead on the floor for a few minutes, then gets up again and joins in the pirate crowd scenes without comment). In contrast, the [[Literature/PeterAndWendy book version]] later written by Sir James M. Barrie is a [[Satire sly]] {{Deconstruction}} of the [[ChildrenAreInnocent Victorian notion of the sacred innocence]] of [[ChildrenAreCruel children]], full of ParentalBonus [[BlackComedy dark humor] and subtle GallowsHumor; Barrie was a master satirist for his time, though few of his satires are remembered today.
22nd Feb '17 6:30:45 PM Pamina
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** Captain Hook usually doesn't die in most versions.

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** Captain Hook usually doesn't die in most versions.the Disney version. Various unofficial sequels such as ''Film/{{Hook}}'' also retcon the original ending to keep him alive.



* SpellMyNameWithAnS: Is it Tinkerbell, Tinkerbelle, or Tinker Bell? The ''Fanchise/KingdomHearts'' series uses Tinker Bell, and so does the new Disney movie that centers around her. It's likely that Tinker Bell is the official spelling, as it is spelled that way in the original novel.

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* SpellMyNameWithAnS: Is it Tinkerbell, Tinkerbelle, Disney's version of the fairy companion's name spelled "Tinkerbell," "Tinkerbelle," or Tinker Bell? "Tinker Bell"? The ''Fanchise/KingdomHearts'' series uses Tinker Bell, and so does the new Disney movie that centers around her. It's likely that Tinker Bell is the official spelling, as it is spelled that way in the original novel.
20th Dec '16 2:17:30 AM rafi
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* ClapYourHandsIfYouBelieve: TropeNamer comes from a famous scene. A fairy is mortally wounded any time a child says "I don't believe in fairies;" in the scene in question, Peter uses the effect in reverse to save the fairy Tinker Bell's life by calling on children everywhere to indicate that they do believe in fairies. (In the original stage version - which predates the novel and the various film and television adaptations - this was an audience participation bit...and, in case you're wondering, if the audience is a bunch of heartless bastards who won't clap, the orchestra is instructed to begin the applause.)
7th Dec '16 12:27:22 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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James M. Barrie was a prolific writer at the turn of the 20th century, but his most-beloved works are his play and novels about Peter Pan, the boy who refused to grow up and lives in Neverland, a MagicalLand. He has a feisty fairy {{Sidekick}} in Tinker Bell.

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James M. Barrie was a prolific writer at the turn of the 20th century, but his most-beloved works are his play and novels about Peter Pan, the boy who refused to grow up and lives in Neverland, a MagicalLand. He has a feisty fairy {{Sidekick}} FairyCompanion in Tinker Bell.
16th Nov '16 3:41:54 PM Pamina
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** In just about any theatrical or film version, Peter was played by a woman, until [[Film/PeterPan the 2003 version]] came in.
** Disney's ''[[Disney/PeterPan Peter Pan]]'' had Peter voiced by a boy, Bobby Driscol.
** The only male to have played Peter Pan on Broadway is Jack Noseworthy, who was an understudy in ''Jerome Robbins' Broadway'', a musical revue of highlights of choreographer Jerome Robbins' work, which included the Mary Martin Broadway version.

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** In just about any theatrical or film version, Peter was is played by a woman, until woman. On film, the only exceptions are the [[Disney/PeterPan Disney version]], which has Peter voiced by Bobby Driscoll, and [[Film/PeterPan the 2003 version]] came in.
** Disney's ''[[Disney/PeterPan Peter Pan]]'' had Peter voiced by a boy, Bobby Driscol.
** The
with Jeremy Sumpter. Meanwhile, the only male to have played Peter Pan on Broadway is Jack Noseworthy, who was an understudy in ''Jerome Robbins' Broadway'', a musical revue of highlights of choreographer Jerome Robbins' work, which included the Mary Martin Broadway version.
31st Oct '16 9:17:58 AM Prinzenick
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Peter Pan is a {{t|heTrickster}}rickster, only nominally human. In his first appearance, ''Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens'' (which was one of several stories included in the book ''Literature/TheLittleWhiteBird''), Peter is alluded to as being [[LiminalBeing half bird]]; as all children in fact come from birds, but only Peter is close enough to his youth to remember ''being'' a bird. In Neverland, he is more like a playful demigod, with aspects of Puck and Pan. The character has become something of a cultural symbol for youthful exuberance and innocence, especially if it persists into adulthood; it also evokes the poignant flip side - never becoming truly mature. Music/MichaelJackson identified with the character so much he named his estate (with an amusement park, et. al. on the grounds) "Neverland Ranch". The darker implications of eternal youth and perpetual irresponsibility is likely why a well-remembered 1987 film about teen vampires was called ''Film/TheLostBoys''.

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Peter Pan is a {{t|heTrickster}}rickster, only nominally human. In his first appearance, ''Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens'' ''Literature/PeterPanInKensingtonGardens'' (which was one of several stories included in the book ''Literature/TheLittleWhiteBird''), Peter is alluded to as being [[LiminalBeing half bird]]; as all children in fact come from birds, but only Peter is close enough to his youth to remember ''being'' a bird. In Neverland, he is more like a playful demigod, with aspects of Puck and Pan. The character has become something of a cultural symbol for youthful exuberance and innocence, especially if it persists into adulthood; it also evokes the poignant flip side - never becoming truly mature. Music/MichaelJackson identified with the character so much he named his estate (with an amusement park, et. al. on the grounds) "Neverland Ranch". The darker implications of eternal youth and perpetual irresponsibility is likely why a well-remembered 1987 film about teen vampires was called ''Film/TheLostBoys''.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.PeterPan