History Literature / ParadiseLost

16th Dec '15 11:31:52 AM Morgenthaler
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* FantasyCounterpartCulture: Not in the poem itself, but in the paintings of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Martin_%28painter%29 John Martin]] inspired by it, the {{Pandemonium}} (Palace of Demons) looks suspiciously [[TheRomanEmpire Roman]] and {{Satan}} himself [[http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/38/Pandemonium.jpg is depicted as a man (not as the traditional horned monster) in a Roman Emperor's ceremonial uniform]].

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* FantasyCounterpartCulture: Not in the poem itself, but in the paintings of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Martin_%28painter%29 John Martin]] inspired by it, the {{Pandemonium}} Pandemonium (Palace of Demons) looks suspiciously [[TheRomanEmpire Roman]] and {{Satan}} himself [[http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/38/Pandemonium.jpg is depicted as a man (not as the traditional horned monster) in a Roman Emperor's ceremonial uniform]].
15th Dec '15 3:19:42 PM Morgenthaler
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* EscapedFromHell: Satan himself had to escape from Hell before he could truly rule it, doing so by making a bargain with Sin and Death, who had been placed there to guard the exit.
2nd Oct '15 10:57:13 AM bt8257
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''Paradise Lost'' is Creator/JohnMilton's sprawling [[NarrativePoem epic poem]] exploring the Fall of Man, and attempting to reconcile the idea of {{God}}'s omniscience with Free Will. First published in ten books in 1667, the twelve-book version modern readers will be familiar with came out in 1674. Notably told largely from the perspective of {{Satan}} himself, though other scenes focus on {{God}} or Adam and Eve. ''Almost'' a {{Prequel}} to Literature/TheBible, though chronologically most of the action (''all'' of it, if you don't count the lengthy {{Flashback}} to the War in Heaven and Michael's summary of postlapsarian history yet to come) takes place entirely during the third chapter of Genesis. In epic theory (and yes, such a thing exists), ''Paradise Lost'' is the final epic, as it has elements of everything from ''Literature/TheOdyssey'' up through ''Literature/TheDivineComedy'' and ''TheFaerieQueene''.

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''Paradise Lost'' is Creator/JohnMilton's sprawling [[NarrativePoem epic poem]] exploring the Fall of Man, and attempting to reconcile the idea of {{God}}'s omniscience with Free Will. First published in ten books in 1667, the twelve-book version modern readers will be familiar with came out in 1674. Notably told largely from the perspective of {{Satan}} himself, though other scenes focus on {{God}} or Adam and Eve. ''Almost'' a {{Prequel}} to Literature/TheBible, though chronologically most of the action (''all'' of it, if you don't count the lengthy {{Flashback}} to the War in Heaven and Michael's summary of postlapsarian history yet to come) takes place entirely during the third chapter of Genesis. In epic theory (and yes, such a thing exists), ''Paradise Lost'' is the final epic, as it has elements of everything from ''Literature/TheOdyssey'' up through ''Literature/TheDivineComedy'' and ''TheFaerieQueene''.
''Literature/TheFaerieQueene''.
2nd Oct '15 10:56:34 AM bt8257
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Added DiffLines:

* MightMakesRight: Arguably the UrExample. God's authority derives from his overwhelming power, and rebellion against him is taken as self-evidently wrong.
20th Mar '15 11:29:07 PM mois
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* CurbStompBattle: God makes things interesting by only fielding exactly as many angels as Satan has demons to keep the battle at a stalemate until the Son takes the field and wipes the floor with the entire rebel army on his own. The Son is so terrifying that the demons throw ''themselves'' into Hell.

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* CurbStompBattle: God makes things interesting by only fielding exactly as many angels as Satan has demons to keep the battle at a stalemate until the Son takes the field and wipes the floor with the entire rebel army on his own. The Son is so terrifying that the demons throw ''themselves'' into Hell.



* SelfInflictedHell: The main point of Satan's story is to show that damnation is the will of the sinner, not God, who is always ready to forgive. Satan and his angels pointedly cast ''themselves'' into Hell after losing the War in Heaven.
* ShapeShifting: The devils can do this.
18th Mar '15 11:32:29 AM Drakein
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It's well-known as a source for ''mountains'' of literary criticism and a host of {{Alternative Character Interpretation}}s. Many think the poem [[DesignatedVillain makes a better case]] for {{Satan}} than {{God}}. Creator/WilliamBlake famously wrote that, "The reason Milton wrote in fetters when he wrote of Angels and God, and at liberty when of Devils and Hell, is because he was a true poet and ''of the Devils' party without knowing it''." [[MisaimedFandom This was almost certainly not Milton's intent]], but while most critics acknowledge this, [[DeathOfTheAuthor some assert that his intent is not the point]]. Ever since forty years ago and Stanley Fish's ''Surprised By Sin'', other academic critics assert that this ''is'' the point; the author intended to subvert MisaimedFandom by making the reader sympathetic to Satan in the opening part, but then surprising the reader by finding out that Satan was lying and is evil all along in the later parts. By this argument, the reader re-enacts the Fall by reading the work. The multitude of different ways to read it are undoubtedly part of the appeal for scholars and literature buffs alike -- it helps that this opens limitless doors for [[FanWank reasonable argument]]. [[FirstInstallmentWins They could read the sequel]] but speculation is more fun.

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It's well-known as a source for ''mountains'' of literary criticism and a host of {{Alternative Character Interpretation}}s. Many think the poem [[DesignatedVillain makes a better case]] for {{Satan}} than {{God}}. Creator/WilliamBlake famously wrote that, "The reason Milton wrote in fetters when he wrote of Angels and God, and at liberty when of Devils and Hell, is because he was a true poet and ''of the Devils' party without knowing it''." [[MisaimedFandom This It's a possibility that this was almost certainly not Milton's intent]], intent, but while most critics acknowledge this, [[DeathOfTheAuthor some assert that his intent is not the point]]. Ever since forty years ago and Stanley Fish's ''Surprised By Sin'', other academic Other critics assert that this ''is'' the point; the author intended to subvert MisaimedFandom by making the reader sympathetic to Satan in the opening part, but then surprising the reader by finding out that Satan was lying and is evil all along in the later parts. By this argument, the reader re-enacts the Fall by reading the work. The multitude of different ways to read it are undoubtedly part of the appeal for scholars and literature buffs alike -- it helps that this opens limitless doors for [[FanWank reasonable argument]]. [[FirstInstallmentWins They could read the sequel]] but speculation is more fun.
15th Mar '15 6:30:13 AM Silverblade2
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* DrivenByEnvy: Satan, and arguably Eve.

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* DrivenByEnvy: Satan, and arguably Eve.Satan



* StrawmanHasAPoint: Satan argues against God by invoking democracy, free speech and egalitarianism, casting God's authority in the light of a dictatorship. This subject matter hit close to home for Milton, who was an outspoken critic of earthly censorship and autocracy.



* ThenLetMeBeEvil - "So should I purchase dear short intermission bought with double smart. This knows my punisher, therefore as far from granting he as I from begging peace." More directly: "Farewell, remorse! All good to me is lost. Evil, be thou my good."

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* ThenLetMeBeEvil - ThenLetMeBeEvil: "So should I purchase dear short intermission bought with double smart. This knows my punisher, therefore as far from granting he as I from begging peace." More directly: "Farewell, remorse! All good to me is lost. Evil, be thou my good."
11th Mar '15 10:26:18 PM MatthewTheRaven
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* OddNameOut: For the angels we have Abdiel, Gabriel, Michael, Raphael, Uriel, etc. (Hebrew Names) and Lucifer (The Latin One). The Hebrew version is Lucifel.

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* OddNameOut: For the angels we have Abdiel, Gabriel, Michael, Raphael, Uriel, etc. (Hebrew Names) and Lucifer (The Latin One). The Hebrew version is Lucifel.
2nd Mar '15 4:07:10 PM Drakein
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* CurbStompBattle: God makes things interesting by only fielding exactly as many angels as Satan has demons to keep the battle at a stalemate until the Son takes the field and wipes the floor with the entire rebel army on his own. The Son is so terrifying that the demons throw ''themselves'' into Hell. Thematically, that's very important.

to:

* CurbStompBattle: God makes things interesting by only fielding exactly as many angels as Satan has demons to keep the battle at a stalemate until the Son takes the field and wipes the floor with the entire rebel army on his own. The Son is so terrifying that the demons throw ''themselves'' into Hell. Thematically, that's very important.



* GodIsEvil: [[BadIsGoodAndGoodIsBad According to Satan]]. [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation Some readers agree with him.]]
* GodIsGood: He explains that He has given His creations free will, making them "fit to stand but free to fall." He also reminds everyone that His forgiveness is always available for those who ask of it.
* GoodIsNotNice: God does throw Adam and Eve out of Paradise. There are consequences to using your free will to sin.

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* GodIsEvil: [[BadIsGoodAndGoodIsBad According to Satan]].Satan and the fallen. [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation Some readers agree with him.]]
* GodIsGood: He explains that He he has given His his creations free will, making them "fit to stand but free to fall." He also reminds everyone and that His forgiveness is always available for those who ask of it.
he forgives the repenters.
* GoodIsNotNice: God does throw Adam and Eve out of Paradise. There are consequences to using your free will to sin.Paradise, despite their repentance for disobeying him.



* PrimordialChaos: The vast, violent and unpredicatable gap between Heaven and Hell, which Satan braves through in order to find Paradise.



* TheQuest: Satan takes off a long, dangerous journey through Chaos, the gap between Heaven and Hell, in his mission to find Eden and the new creation.



* RousingSpeech: Beezelbub in the first book

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* RousingSpeech: Beezelbub in the first bookbook.
1st Mar '15 10:54:29 PM moi
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* BlackAndWhiteMorality[=/=]BlackAndGrayMorality[=/=]GreyAndGrayMorality[=/=]EvilVersusEvil: The book has been interpreted countless ways over the centuries.



* YouCantFightFate: Inverted. {{God}} states that even though he knows with perfect clarity what ''will'' happen (sin), he's not responsible ''for'' it happening, because he's granted his creations free will. Thus, people are not fated to sin upon their creation, they chose to do it.

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* YouCantFightFate: Inverted. {{God}} states that even though he knows with perfect clarity what ''will'' happen (sin), he's not responsible ''for'' it happening, because he's granted his creations free will. Thus, people are not fated to sin upon their creation, they chose to do exactly how all of {{Satan}}'s schemes will fall apart before he even thinks of them, and talks at length about it.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.ParadiseLost