History Literature / NorthangerAbbey

5th Dec '16 5:21:37 PM StarSword
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Countering the AdaptationOverdosed tendency of Austen's other works, this has to be the least adapted of all her works. It was twice adapted into {{Made for TV Movie}}s, once by Creator/TheBBC in 1986 and once by {{ITV}} in 2007. Marvel Illustrated released a ComicBookAdaptation starting November 2011, script by Nancy Butler, pencils and inks by Janet Lee, and covers by Julian Totino Tedesco. It was also the second book given a modern day SettingUpdate by The Austen Project, written by [[WireInTheBlood Val McDermid]].

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Countering the AdaptationOverdosed tendency of Austen's other works, this has to be the least adapted of all her works. It was twice adapted into {{Made for TV Movie}}s, once by Creator/TheBBC in 1986 and once by {{ITV}} in 2007. The Creator/{{PBS}} series ''Series/{{Wishbone}}'' also used it as the basis of an episode, with the eponymous dog in the role of Henry. Marvel Illustrated released a ComicBookAdaptation starting November 2011, script by Nancy Butler, pencils and inks by Janet Lee, and covers by Julian Totino Tedesco. It was also the second book given a modern day SettingUpdate by The Austen Project, written by [[WireInTheBlood Val McDermid]].
13th Aug '16 7:49:38 PM LadyNorbert
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* AluminiumChristmasTrees: After the 2007 adaptation was broadcast, a letter to the ''RadioTimes'' complained that the scriptwriter had added a jarring reference to baseball. That passage came word for word from the book. In fact, the OED records it as the first mention of baseball (by that name) in literature.

to:

* AluminiumChristmasTrees: AluminumChristmasTrees: After the 2007 adaptation was broadcast, a letter to the ''RadioTimes'' complained that the scriptwriter had added a jarring reference to baseball. That passage came word for word from the book. In fact, the OED records it as the first mention of baseball (by that name) in literature.



* BlackAndWhiteMorality: This is Catherine's firm belief at the opening of the novel. In the end you could argue that the novel encourages to consider things as TheGoodTheBadAndTheEvil with a lot of ALighterShadeOfGrey and ClassicalAntiHero (Catherine, despite being moral, being this).

to:

* BlackAndWhiteMorality: This is Catherine's firm belief at the opening of the novel. In the end end, you could argue that the novel encourages to consider things as TheGoodTheBadAndTheEvil with a lot of ALighterShadeOfGrey and ClassicalAntiHero (Catherine, despite being moral, being this).
13th Aug '16 7:29:43 PM LadyNorbert
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The fourth of ten children, and eldest daughter, 17-year-old Catherine Morland is a {{Tomboy}} grown into a major GothicNovel fangirl. She's become so involved in reading that she fancies herself as the heroine of such a work as ''Literature/TheMysteriesOfUdolpho''. One day, she is invited to come along with the childless Allens for a trip to the spring resort of Bath. There, she meets two families, the Thorpes and the Tilneys. The Thorpes' eldest son, the egocentric twit John, tries to woo her. However, Catherine fancies the Tilneys' second son, the gentleman Henry. Henry's father, General Tilney, invites Catherine over to the Tilneys' estate, the eponymous Northanger Abbey. There, Catherine's expectations of the world clash with bitter reality.

Countering the AdaptationOverdosed tendency of Austen's other works, this has to be the least adapted of all her works. It was twice adapted into {{Made for TV Movie}}s, once by Creator/TheBBC in 1986 and once by {{ITV}} in 2007. Marvel Illustrated is releasing a ComicBookAdaptation starting November 2011, script by Nancy Butler, pencils and inks by Janet Lee, and covers by Julian Totino Tedesco. It was also the second book given a modern day SettingUpdate by The Austen Project, written by [[WireInTheBlood Val McDermid]].

to:

The fourth of ten children, and eldest daughter, 17-year-old Catherine Morland is a {{Tomboy}} grown into a major GothicNovel fangirl. She's become so involved in reading that she fancies herself as the heroine of such a work as ''Literature/TheMysteriesOfUdolpho''. One day, she is invited to come along with the childless Allens for a trip to the spring resort of Bath. There, she meets two families, the Thorpes and the Tilneys. The Thorpes' eldest son, the egocentric twit John, tries to woo her. However, Catherine fancies the Tilneys' second son, the gentleman Henry. Henry's father, General Tilney, invites Catherine over to the Tilneys' estate, the eponymous Northanger Abbey. There, Catherine's expectations of the world clash with bitter reality.

Countering the AdaptationOverdosed tendency of Austen's other works, this has to be the least adapted of all her works. It was twice adapted into {{Made for TV Movie}}s, once by Creator/TheBBC in 1986 and once by {{ITV}} in 2007. Marvel Illustrated is releasing released a ComicBookAdaptation starting November 2011, script by Nancy Butler, pencils and inks by Janet Lee, and covers by Julian Totino Tedesco. It was also the second book given a modern day SettingUpdate by The Austen Project, written by [[WireInTheBlood Val McDermid]].



* AbusiveParents: General Tilney might be seen as emotionally abusive. His behavior to his children goes from overbearing to tyrannising and it's clear that Eleanor fears him. Catherine even wonders why his children are always so sedate when he's present.
* AdultsAreUseless: Mrs. Allen fails to do her job when it comes to advising Catherine on etiquette. Enough so, in fact, that Catherine finally complains that she's being left dangerously to her own devices.

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* AbusiveParents: General Tilney might be seen as emotionally abusive. His behavior to his children goes from overbearing to tyrannising terrorizing, and it's clear that Eleanor fears him. Catherine even wonders why his children are always so sedate when he's present.
* AdultsAreUseless: Mrs. Allen fails to do her job when it comes to advising Catherine on etiquette. Enough so, She fails at it so completely, in fact, that Catherine finally complains that she's being left dangerously to her own devices.



* BigBad: John Thorpe, who is the main source of Catherine's problems and does his best to drive a wedge between her and Henry Tilney, even after he disappears from the novel.
* BigFancyHouse: Northanger Abbey from the title. Catherine is disappointed as it is too fancy and too comfortable for her taste. She would have preferred something of a haunted house.
* BlackAndWhiteMorality: Catherine's firm belief at the opening of the novel. In the end you could argue that the novel encourages to consider things as TheGoodTheBadAndTheEvil with a lot of ALighterShadeOfGrey and ClassicalAntiHero (Catherine, despite being moral, being this).
* BuildingOfAdventure: Catherine expects the abbey to be this and is rather disappointed when it turns out to be just an elegant building with every modern comfort.

to:

* BigBad: John Thorpe, who is the main source of Catherine's problems and does his best to drive a wedge between her and Henry Tilney, Tilney - even after he disappears from the novel.
* BigFancyHouse: Northanger Abbey from the title. Catherine is disappointed disappointed, as it is too fancy and too comfortable for her taste. She would have preferred something of a haunted house.{{haunted house}}.
* BlackAndWhiteMorality: This is Catherine's firm belief at the opening of the novel. In the end you could argue that the novel encourages to consider things as TheGoodTheBadAndTheEvil with a lot of ALighterShadeOfGrey and ClassicalAntiHero (Catherine, despite being moral, being this).
* BuildingOfAdventure: Catherine expects the abbey to be this this, and is rather disappointed when it turns out to be just an elegant building with every modern comfort.



* CompletelyMissingThePoint: The Paperback Library printing of this book, egregiously so. They [[http://www.pemberley.com/janeinfo/nhabgoth.jpg mistook it for]] [[http://www.pemberley.com/janeinfo/nabgoth2.gif an actual gothic novel]] of the sort that it parodies. [[HilarityEnsues Hilarity ensued]]. Could also count as a ContemptibleCover.

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* CompletelyMissingThePoint: The Paperback Library printing of this book, egregiously so. They [[http://www.pemberley.com/janeinfo/nhabgoth.jpg mistook it for]] [[http://www.pemberley.com/janeinfo/nabgoth2.gif an actual gothic Gothic novel]] of the sort that it parodies. [[HilarityEnsues Hilarity ensued]]. Could also count as a ContemptibleCover.



* ConspiracyTheorist: Catherine has all these suspicions about the Tilneys and the abbey, all of them based on nothing except conventions of gothic novels, and jumping to wild conclusions based on tiny discrepancies in what she thinks someone's behaviour should be. For this, she earns the title of IdiotHero, because although she tends to be smart if naive in other matters, here she drops down right into deep stupidity. She [[CharacterDevelopment gets better, though]].
* DancesAndBalls: At Bath. Catherine meets Henry Tilney at one. At first Catherine finds the balls of Bath torturous, because she doesn't know anybody and therefore can't dance or talk to anyone. A master of ceremonies explicitly introduces strangers in town, such as Miss Morland.

to:

* ConspiracyTheorist: Catherine has all these suspicions about the Tilneys and the abbey, all of them based on nothing except conventions of gothic Gothic novels, and jumping to wild conclusions based on tiny discrepancies in what she thinks someone's behaviour should be. For this, she earns the title of IdiotHero, because although she tends to be smart if naive in other matters, here she drops down right into deep stupidity. She [[CharacterDevelopment gets better, though]].
* DancesAndBalls: At Bath. Catherine attends a number of these when she visits Bath, and meets Henry Tilney at one. At first Catherine finds the balls of Bath torturous, because she doesn't know anybody and therefore can't dance or talk to anyone. A master of ceremonies explicitly introduces strangers in town, such as Miss Morland.Morland, and is responsible for her introduction to Henry Tilney as a young man of very good character.



* DeusExMachina: General Tilney refused to let Catherine wed Henry only because [[spoiler:he did not want Henry to marry a poor girl]]. But then, his daughter Eleanor marries a nobleman, making him happy enough to consent to his son's marrying whomever he wants (although it also doesn't hurt when he finds out that Catherine's [[spoiler: not as poor as he thought]]). By the way, [[ChekhovsGun remember]] the [[spoiler:laundry list? That was said rich man's]].

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* DeusExMachina: General Tilney refused to let Catherine wed Henry only because [[spoiler:he did not want Henry to marry a poor girl]]. But then, when his daughter Eleanor marries a nobleman, making it makes him happy enough to consent to his son's marrying whomever he wants (although it also doesn't hurt when he finds out that Catherine's [[spoiler: not as poor as he thought]]). By the way, [[ChekhovsGun remember]] the [[spoiler:laundry list? That was said rich man's]].



* FirstNameBasis: Isabella and Catherine reach this very quickly.

to:

* FirstNameBasis: Isabella and Catherine reach this very quickly.quickly, which is unusual for the time period and is an indication of just how quickly they jumped into their deep friendship.



** Subverted in editions that include Lady Susan and the unfinished novels, the end of Northanger Abbey occurs when only halfway through the book.

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** Subverted in editions that include Lady Susan ''Lady Susan'' and the unfinished novels, novels; in these, the end of Northanger Abbey ''Northanger Abbey'' occurs when only halfway through the book.



* GoldDigger: The Thorpes, who take the Morlands for being ''very'' rich and do everything they can to attach to them. (The Morlands, while comfortable in finances, are hardly Darcy and Pemberly.)

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* GoldDigger: The Thorpes, who take the Morlands for being ''very'' rich and do everything they can to attach to them. (The Morlands, while comfortable in finances, are hardly [[Literature/PrideAndPrejudice Darcy and Pemberly.Pemberley]].)



** Catherine "remembered that her eldest brother had lately formed an intimacy with a young man of his own college". At the time this would be a strong, deep bond known as a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romantic_friendship romantic friendship]]. Friend couples hugged, kissed, ''just'' slept together, wrote passionate letters, and pledged their devotion with rings, locks of hair and keepsakes. There were church ceremonies to solemnize their platonic union.

to:

** Catherine "remembered that her eldest brother had lately formed an intimacy with a young man of his own college". At the time this would be a strong, deep bond known as a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romantic_friendship romantic friendship]]. Friend couples hugged, kissed, ''just'' slept together, wrote passionate letters, and pledged their devotion with rings, locks of hair and keepsakes. There were even church ceremonies to solemnize their platonic union.



* IdenticalGrandson: Catherine expects this of the mother's portrait
* IDoNotSpeakNonverbal: Mrs. Allen explicitly doesn't.

to:

* IdenticalGrandson: Catherine expects this of the Henry's mother's portrait
portrait.
* IDoNotSpeakNonverbal: Mrs. Allen explicitly doesn't. Averted by Catherine and her brother James.



** In the 2007 movie version, this is inverted, as Catherine must, to be romantic in current context, accept to marry Henry even if he becomes poor. So, he tells her first that he broke with his father because he opposed the idea of the marriage and that he'll probably be dishinertited (this is total [[PragmaticAdaptation modern romanticism taking over the rule of the work's universe]] and lack of research, as this never happens in the book, wouldn't have been possible as Henry is a second son and wouldn't have inherited, and finally doesn't even happen in the movie either), and then asks her. She ignores his father's opposition and accepts [[TearsofJoy gladly]].

to:

** In the 2007 movie version, this is inverted, as Catherine must, to be romantic in current context, accept to marry Henry even if he becomes poor. So, he tells her first that he broke with his father because he opposed the idea of the marriage and that he'll probably be dishinertited (this disinherited[[note]]This is total [[PragmaticAdaptation modern romanticism taking over the rule of the work's universe]] and lack of research, as this never happens in the book, wouldn't have been possible as Henry is a second son and wouldn't have inherited, and finally doesn't even happen in the movie either), either[[/note]], and then ''then'' asks her. She ignores his father's opposition and accepts [[TearsofJoy gladly]].



** Played straight when one girl tried to copy Isabella's look and wore a turban like Isabella did. In Isabella's opinion, Charlotte did not pull it off as turbans only suit her own fair face.

to:

** Played straight when one girl tried tries to copy Isabella's look and wore wears a turban like Isabella did. does. In Isabella's opinion, Charlotte did does not pull it off off, as turbans only suit her own fair face.



* MeasuringTheMarigolds: Inverted during Catherine's stay with the Tilneys. While on a pleasant walk, Eleanor and Henry start talking about the path in terms of painting it, making Catherine feel that her own, less-complicated enjoyment is inferior.
* MissingMom: Mrs. Tilney. She died when Eleanor was a teenage girl at school.

to:

* MeasuringTheMarigolds: Inverted during Catherine's stay with the Tilneys. While on a pleasant walk, Eleanor and Henry start talking about the path in terms of painting it, making Catherine feel that her own, less-complicated less complicated enjoyment is inferior.
* MissingMom: Mrs. Tilney. She Tilney died when Eleanor was a teenage girl at school.



* TheOathBreaker: Isabella's jilting her fiance is treated with all the gravity that the era would regard it.

to:

* TheOathBreaker: Isabella's jilting her fiance fiancé is treated with all the gravity that with which the era would regard it.



* RelativeError: Averted, and the narrator is amused. When Catherine sees Henry with an attractive young woman, she immediately (and correctly) assumes it's his sister, because he already mentioned having a sister. The narrator points out that she missed a great opportunity for a dramatic fainting fit there. It is played straight in the 2007 miniseries, in which she mistakes Eleanor for Henry's fiance, which makes their laughing while Henry looks at her while whispering in Eleanor's ear seemingly more cruel.

to:

* RelativeError: Averted, and the narrator is amused. When Catherine sees Henry with an attractive young woman, she immediately (and correctly) assumes it's his sister, because he already mentioned having a sister. The narrator points out that she missed a great opportunity for a dramatic fainting fit there. It is played straight in the 2007 miniseries, in which she mistakes Eleanor for Henry's fiance, fiancée, which makes their laughing while Henry looks at her while whispering in Eleanor's ear seemingly more cruel.



** [[spoiler:John Thorpe for Catherine. He's not much of one though; Catherine perceived him as a {{Jerkass}} from day one and was never truly interested in him in the first place, only doing things with him because he was James's friend and Isabella's brother.]]
* SacredHospitality:
** Played straight by Henry and Eleanor.
** Subverted by General Tilney.

to:

** [[spoiler:John Thorpe for Catherine. He's not much of one one, though; Catherine perceived perceives him as a {{Jerkass}} from day one and was is never truly interested in him in the first place, only doing things with him because he was is James's friend and Isabella's brother.]]
* SacredHospitality:
**
SacredHospitality: Played straight by Henry and Eleanor.
**
Eleanor. Subverted by General Tilney.



* {{Troll}}: On the approach to the abbey, Henry spins a typical gothic romance story about what Catherine will find there, clearly just teasing her about her obsession with them. She later tells herself that she wouldn't have made nearly as big a deal about the cabinet in her room if it didn't play perfectly into his story.
* UnableToSupportAWife: Eleanor's lover -- brought up in the end.

to:

* {{Troll}}: On the approach to the abbey, Henry spins a typical gothic Gothic romance story about what Catherine will find there, clearly just teasing her about her obsession with them. She later tells herself that she wouldn't have made nearly as big a deal about the cabinet in her room if it didn't play perfectly into his story.
* UnableToSupportAWife: Eleanor's lover -- brought up in lover, though this isn't mentioned until the end.
24th Jun '16 9:16:35 AM k410ren
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** [[spoiler:John Thorpe for Catherine. He's not much of one though; Catherine perceived him as a {{Jerkass}} from day one.]]

to:

** [[spoiler:John Thorpe for Catherine. He's not much of one though; Catherine perceived him as a {{Jerkass}} from day one.one and was never truly interested in him in the first place, only doing things with him because he was James's friend and Isabella's brother.]]
14th Jun '16 1:16:04 AM PaulA
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Added DiffLines:

* RomanticFalseLead:
** [[spoiler:Isabella Thorpe for James Morland.]]
** [[spoiler:John Thorpe for Catherine. He's not much of one though; Catherine perceived him as a {{Jerkass}} from day one.]]
1st Jun '16 7:39:02 PM k410ren
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* BadassBaritone: Henry Tilney and John Thorpe have deep, resonant voices in the ITV version.

to:

* BadassBaritone: Henry Tilney and John Thorpe have deep, resonant voices in the ITV version. Since Thorpe is evil, he qualifies for EvilSoundsDeep.
* BlondBrunetteRedhead: Isabella Thorpe, Catherine Morland and Eleanor Tilney in the ITV version.



** Catherine and the Allens getting ambushed on the way to Bath and Mr. Allen fights the ruffians before getting stabbed in the back.

to:

** Catherine and the Allens getting ambushed on the way to Bath and Mr. Allen fights the ruffians with his crutches before getting stabbed in the back.


Added DiffLines:

* NamedByTheAdaptation: The young man Eleanor is in love with is named Edward in the ITV version.


Added DiffLines:

* ParentalMarriageVeto: In the ITV version, aside from the General putting his foot down on Catherine and Henry, Henry mentions that the General has refused to sanction Eleanor's marriage to Edward, the young man she loves, because Edward is only a second son. When Catherine asks what would he do if the girl he falls in love with does not come with a fortune attached, Henry replies that "it would be a stern test of my character."
23rd May '16 12:19:30 PM Morgenthaler
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* BlondesAreEvil: Isabella Thorpe in the ITV version, contrasting with the auburn-haired Eleanor and dark-haired Catherine.
* BlondGuysAreEvil: John Thorpe in the ITV version, in contrast to the dark haired Henry.
13th May '16 5:22:57 AM Solle
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The fourth of ten children, and eldest daughter, 17-year-old Catherine Morland is a {{Tomboy}} grown into a major GothicNovel fan girl. She's become so involved in reading that she fancies herself as the heroine of such a work as ''Literature/TheMysteriesOfUdolpho''. One day, she is invited to come along with the childless Allens for a trip to the spring resort of Bath. There, she meets two families, the Thorpes and the Tilneys. The Thorpes' eldest son, the egocentric twit John, tries to woo her. However, Catherine fancies the Tilneys' second son, the gentleman Henry. Henry's father, General Tilney, invites Catherine over to the Tilneys' estate, the eponymous Northanger Abbey. There, Catherine's expectations of the world clash with bitter reality.

to:

The fourth of ten children, and eldest daughter, 17-year-old Catherine Morland is a {{Tomboy}} grown into a major GothicNovel fan girl.fangirl. She's become so involved in reading that she fancies herself as the heroine of such a work as ''Literature/TheMysteriesOfUdolpho''. One day, she is invited to come along with the childless Allens for a trip to the spring resort of Bath. There, she meets two families, the Thorpes and the Tilneys. The Thorpes' eldest son, the egocentric twit John, tries to woo her. However, Catherine fancies the Tilneys' second son, the gentleman Henry. Henry's father, General Tilney, invites Catherine over to the Tilneys' estate, the eponymous Northanger Abbey. There, Catherine's expectations of the world clash with bitter reality.
11th May '16 8:19:47 PM k410ren
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* SwordFight: One of Catherine's dreams features a duel between Henry Tilney and a dastardly ruffian resembling a creepy young man at the dance the previous evening, later revealed to be John Thorpe.

to:

* SwordFight: One of Catherine's dreams features a duel between Henry Tilney and a dastardly ruffian resembling a creepy young man at the dance the previous evening, evening. The young man is later revealed to be introduced as John Thorpe.Thorpe. This serves as foreshadowing of the young men's vying for Catherine's affections (more aggressively on Thorpe's part).
11th May '16 8:17:20 PM k410ren
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* SwordFight: One of Catherine's dreams features a duel between Henry Tilney and a dastardly ruffian, later revealed to be John Thorpe.

to:

* SwordFight: One of Catherine's dreams features a duel between Henry Tilney and a dastardly ruffian, ruffian resembling a creepy young man at the dance the previous evening, later revealed to be John Thorpe.
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