History Literature / NoliMeTangere

28th Mar '18 10:31:17 AM Estvyk
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Added DiffLines:

* OffscreenMomentOfAwesome: Elias busting Ibarra out of prison, as they surprise Maria Clara so Ibarra can say goodbye. In the 1961 movie it becomes a full-blown action sequence, with Elias using a grappling hook to scale a fortress and the other prisoners breaking out as well, resulting in a big fight.
28th Mar '18 10:20:37 AM Estvyk
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* DeletedScene: Rizal cut a whole chapter called "Elias and Salome" where Elias talks with his LoveInterest who only appears in that chapter. Some translations like National Artist Virgilio Almario's restore it to its proper place.
28th Mar '18 10:04:16 AM Estvyk
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It was originally written in Spanish, which the vast majority of Filipinos today don't know. It has been translated to English and Filipino several times, with the first English version appearing in 1900 and an all-new Penguin Classics version in 2006.

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It was originally written in Spanish, which the vast majority of Filipinos today don't know. It has been translated to English and Filipino several times, with the first English version appearing in 1900 and an all-new Penguin Classics version in 2006.
2006. It has also been adapted for live-action a number of times, most famously as a 1961 black-and-white epic made for Rizal's birth centennial.



--->- Ma. Soledad Locsin translation, 1997

to:

--->- Ma. Maria Soledad Locsin translation, 1997
28th Mar '18 9:42:18 AM Estvyk
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---> Charles Derbyshire translation, 1912.
** Another famous Filipino novel ''Literature/WithoutSeeingTheDawn'' alludes to these lines (as translated).

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---> Charles Derbyshire translation, 1912.
1912
** Another famous Filipino novel ''Literature/WithoutSeeingTheDawn'' novel, ''Literature/WithoutSeeingTheDawn'', alludes to these lines (as translated).
28th Mar '18 9:36:51 AM Estvyk
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It has a sequel, ''Literature/ElFilibusterismo'', which is set thirteen years later.

to:

It was originally written in Spanish, which the vast majority of Filipinos today don't know. It has been translated to English and Filipino several times, with the first English version appearing in 1900 and an all-new Penguin Classics version in 2006.

It has a sequel, ''Literature/ElFilibusterismo'', which is set thirteen years later.
later.



* DeletedScene: Rizal cut a whole chapter called "Elias and Salome" where Elias talks with his LoveInterest who only appears in that chapter. Some translations like National Artist Virgilio Almario's restore it to its proper place.



--->- Ma. Soledad Locsin translation, 1997



* FamousLastWords: The final words of [[spoiler:Elias to Basilio]] are especially famous:

-->I die without seeing the dawn brighten over my native land! You, who have it to see, welcome it and forget not those who have fallen during the night!
---> Charles Derbyshire translation, 1912.
** Another famous Filipino novel ''Literature/WithoutSeeingTheDawn'' alludes to these lines (as translated).



* MarketBasedTitle: The first English translation was called ''The Social Cancer''.

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* MarketBasedTitle: The first English translation was called translations had totally different titles like ''An Eagle Flight'', ''Friars and Filipinos'' and most famously ''The Social Cancer''.
2nd Feb '18 7:44:31 PM Rmpdc
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* JadeColoredGlasses

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* JadeColoredGlassesJadeColoredGlasses: [[spoiler: Crisostomo Ibarra's entire ordeal throughout the book practically shatters his idealism.]]
25th Jan '18 8:35:37 PM fusilcontrafusil
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* BilingualBonus: The title is Latin for "Touch me not" or more accurately "Stop holding on to me", from [[Literature/TheFourGospels the Gospel of John]]. Originally said by Jesus to Mary Magdalene, it's repurposed as a message from Filipinos to Spain, [[{{Applicability}} whether on the personal level or national is up for debate.]]

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* BilingualBonus: The title is Latin for "Touch me not" or more accurately "Stop holding on to me" or "Let go of me", from [[Literature/TheFourGospels the Gospel of John]]. Originally said by Jesus to Mary Magdalene, it's repurposed as a message from Filipinos to Spain, [[{{Applicability}} whether on the personal level or national is up for debate.]]
25th Jan '18 8:31:00 PM fusilcontrafusil
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* BilingualBonus: The title is Latin for "Touch me not," from [[Literature/TheFourGospels the Gospel of John]].

to:

* BilingualBonus: The title is Latin for "Touch me not," not" or more accurately "Stop holding on to me", from [[Literature/TheFourGospels the Gospel of John]].John]]. Originally said by Jesus to Mary Magdalene, it's repurposed as a message from Filipinos to Spain, [[{{Applicability}} whether on the personal level or national is up for debate.]]
25th Jan '18 8:13:06 PM fusilcontrafusil
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* {{Foil}}: Elias to Ibarra. Elias is an Indio, Ibarra is a Creole (Criollo) or Mestizo [[note]] a Filipino with Spanish descent[[/note]]. Whereas Ibarra is an idealist [[spoiler: at first]], Elias is a realist. Ibarra is a privileged man, whereas Elias has suffered oppression due to his race.

to:

* {{Foil}}: Elias to Ibarra. Elias is an Indio, Ibarra is a Creole (Criollo) or Mestizo [[note]] a Filipino with Spanish descent[[/note]]. Whereas Ibarra is an idealist [[spoiler: at first]], Elias is a realist. Ibarra is a privileged man, whereas Elias has suffered oppression due to his race.
25th Jan '18 8:11:37 PM fusilcontrafusil
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* {{Foil}}: Elias to Ibarra. Elias is an Indio, Ibarra is a Creole [[note]] a Filipino with Spanish descent[[/note]]. Whereas Ibarra is an idealist [[spoiler: at first]], Elias is a realist. Ibarra is a privileged man, whereas Elias has suffered oppression due to his race.

to:

* {{Foil}}: Elias to Ibarra. Elias is an Indio, Ibarra is a Creole (Criollo) or Mestizo [[note]] a Filipino with Spanish descent[[/note]]. Whereas Ibarra is an idealist [[spoiler: at first]], Elias is a realist. Ibarra is a privileged man, whereas Elias has suffered oppression due to his race.
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