History Literature / Middlemarch

22nd Mar '16 4:41:52 PM RichardW72
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Two television adaptations have been made, in 1968 and in 1994, and a film by Sam Mendes is in production.

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Two television adaptations have been made, in 1968 and in 1994, and a 1994. No film by has yet been made, although Sam Mendes is in production.was once reported to have been producing one.
17th Aug '15 6:10:49 AM bombadilla
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* EnglishRose: All three main female characters are subversions. Rosamond was raised to be, and seen by most outsiders as, an archetypal English Rose: beautiful, gentle and virtuous, but inwardly she is shallow and selfish. Mary Garth is perfectly honourable and well-mannered, but she is quite plain. Dorothea is the one that comes closest to playing this trope straight, as she is at once beautiful, incredibly modest and a seriously good person, but she is a bit too independent to be considered a completely decent lady in 19th century England.

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* EnglishRose: All three main female characters are subversions. Rosamond was raised to be, and seen by most outsiders as, an archetypal English Rose: beautiful, gentle and virtuous, but whereas inwardly she is shallow and selfish. Mary Garth is perfectly honourable and well-mannered, but she is quite plain. Dorothea is the one that comes closest to playing this trope straight, as she is at once beautiful, incredibly modest and a seriously good person, but she is a bit too independent to be considered a completely decent lady in 19th century England.
17th Aug '15 6:00:31 AM bombadilla
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* EnglishRose: All three main female characters are subversions. Rosamond was raised to be, and seen by most outsiders as, an archetypal EnglishRose, beautiful, gentle and virtuous; but inwardly she is shallow and selfish. Mary Garth is perfectly honourable and well-mannered, but she is quite plain. Dorothea is the one that comes closest to playing this trope straight, as she is at once beautiful, incredibly modest and a seriously good person, but she is a bit too independent to be considered a completely decent lady in 19th century England.

to:

* EnglishRose: All three main female characters are subversions. Rosamond was raised to be, and seen by most outsiders as, an archetypal EnglishRose, English Rose: beautiful, gentle and virtuous; virtuous, but inwardly she is shallow and selfish. Mary Garth is perfectly honourable and well-mannered, but she is quite plain. Dorothea is the one that comes closest to playing this trope straight, as she is at once beautiful, incredibly modest and a seriously good person, but she is a bit too independent to be considered a completely decent lady in 19th century England.
17th Aug '15 5:58:24 AM bombadilla
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* EnglishRose: All three main female characters are subversions. Rosamond was raised to be, and seen by most outsiders as, an archetypal EnglishRose, beautiful, gentle and virtuous; but inwardly she is shallow and selfish. Mary Garth is perfectly honourable and well-mannered, but she is quite plain. Dorothea is the one that comes closest to playing this trope straight, as she is at once beautiful, incredibly modest and a seriously good person, but she is a bit too "fervent" in her beliefs and ideals, and a bit too interested in "manly affairs" (such as managing her land, or science and learning) to be considered a completely decent lady in 19th century England.

to:

* EnglishRose: All three main female characters are subversions. Rosamond was raised to be, and seen by most outsiders as, an archetypal EnglishRose, beautiful, gentle and virtuous; but inwardly she is shallow and selfish. Mary Garth is perfectly honourable and well-mannered, but she is quite plain. Dorothea is the one that comes closest to playing this trope straight, as she is at once beautiful, incredibly modest and a seriously good person, but she is a bit too "fervent" in her beliefs and ideals, and a bit too interested in "manly affairs" (such as managing her land, or science and learning) independent to be considered a completely decent lady in 19th century England.
17th Aug '15 5:57:11 AM bombadilla
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* EnglishRose: All three main female characters are subversions. Rosamond was raised to be, and seen by most outsiders as, an archetypal EnglishRose, beautiful, gentle and virtuous, but inwardly she is shallow and selfish. Mary Garth is perfectly honourable and well-mannered, but she is quite plain. Dorothea is the one that comes closest to playing this trope straight, as she is at once beautiful, incredibly modest and a seriously good person, but she is a bit too "fervent" in her beliefs and ideals, and a bit too interested in "manly affairs" (such as managing her land, or science and learning) to be considered a completely decent lady in 19th century England.

to:

* EnglishRose: All three main female characters are subversions. Rosamond was raised to be, and seen by most outsiders as, an archetypal EnglishRose, beautiful, gentle and virtuous, virtuous; but inwardly she is shallow and selfish. Mary Garth is perfectly honourable and well-mannered, but she is quite plain. Dorothea is the one that comes closest to playing this trope straight, as she is at once beautiful, incredibly modest and a seriously good person, but she is a bit too "fervent" in her beliefs and ideals, and a bit too interested in "manly affairs" (such as managing her land, or science and learning) to be considered a completely decent lady in 19th century England.
17th Aug '15 5:56:21 AM bombadilla
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Added DiffLines:

* EnglishRose: All three main female characters are subversions. Rosamond was raised to be, and seen by most outsiders as, an archetypal EnglishRose, beautiful, gentle and virtuous, but inwardly she is shallow and selfish. Mary Garth is perfectly honourable and well-mannered, but she is quite plain. Dorothea is the one that comes closest to playing this trope straight, as she is at once beautiful, incredibly modest and a seriously good person, but she is a bit too "fervent" in her beliefs and ideals, and a bit too interested in "manly affairs" (such as managing her land, or science and learning) to be considered a completely decent lady in 19th century England.
3rd Jan '15 3:43:15 PM pokedude10
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Added DiffLines:

* ExtremelyLengthyCreation: InUniverse. Rev. Casaubon's life's work, an unfinished book ''The Key to All Mythologies'', is intended as a monument to the tradition of Christian syncretism. [[spoiler:It turns out his life's work is useless as he is behind on current studies (he doesn't read German, so his scholarship is incomplete). He is aware of this, but has put too much time into his research to admit it.]]
4th May '14 5:48:44 AM LinguaViva
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** Subverted in Mary Garth's case as well: she makes it very clear to Fred Vincy that he has no chance with her if he continues reckless and idle.

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** Subverted in Mary Garth's case as well: she makes it very clear to Fred Vincy that he has no chance with her if he continues reckless to live recklessly and idle.
5th Mar '14 12:56:11 PM fq
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* {{Doorstopper}}: It's 800 pages and the most exciting things that happens are the deaths of two characters, a provincial doctor's threatened disgrace and the coming of age of a idealistic young woman. That said, this troper thinks it's great.

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* {{Doorstopper}}: It's 800 pages and the most exciting things that happens are the deaths of two characters, a provincial doctor's threatened disgrace and the coming of age of a idealistic young woman. That said, this troper thinks it's great.
7th Oct '13 4:33:15 PM wootzits
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* BreakTheHaughty: Bulstrode and Lydgate, in particular.

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* BreakTheHaughty: Bulstrode and Lydgate, in particular. particular.
* CatchPhrase: Mr. Brooke's "You know, that kind of thing." or some variation thereof.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.Middlemarch