History Literature / MaryPoppins

1st Jan '17 5:41:10 AM PaulA
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* PoliticallyCorrectHistory: Travers was one of the few classic authors to live long enough to have to personally edit her books to eliminate racist terms and stereotypes. In other cases, such as Creator/EnidBlyton, this was done posthumously.

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* PoliticallyCorrectHistory: Travers was one of the few classic authors to live long enough to have to personally edit her books to eliminate racist terms and stereotypes. In other cases, such as Creator/EnidBlyton, this was done posthumously.
31st Dec '16 1:34:16 PM nombretomado
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* PoliticallyCorrectHistory: Travers was one of the few classic authors to live long enough to have to personally edit her books to eliminate racist terms and stereotypes. In other cases, such as EnidBlyton, this was done posthumously.

to:

* PoliticallyCorrectHistory: Travers was one of the few classic authors to live long enough to have to personally edit her books to eliminate racist terms and stereotypes. In other cases, such as EnidBlyton, Creator/EnidBlyton, this was done posthumously.
22nd Dec '16 7:30:14 AM dsneybuf
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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: ''Mary Poppins and the Match-Man'' describes Mary Poppins' age as 17, despite later books and adaptations making her seem older than that. It also has a plot in which the Banks children play a minimal role, though their omission from Mary Poppins' day out does tie in well with the lesson she teaches them at the end of the episode, that everyone has their own fairyland (which will probably look different for an older person than for a young child. On their date, Mary and the Match-Man had afternoon tea and rode carousel horses around an idealized landscape, whereas the children enquired if she had met storybook characters). When P.L. Travers re-wrote the story as "The Day Out", she removed the specificity of Mary's age, but the Banks children remained mostly absent.

to:

* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: ''Mary Poppins and the Match-Man'' describes Mary Poppins' age as 17, despite later books and adaptations making her seem older than that. It also has a plot in which the Banks children play a minimal role, though their omission from Mary Poppins' day out does tie in well with the lesson she teaches them at the end of the episode, that everyone has their own fairyland (which will probably look different for an older person than for a young child. On their date, Mary Poppins and the Match-Man had afternoon tea and rode carousel horses around an idealized landscape, whereas the children enquired if she had met storybook characters). When P.L. Travers re-wrote the story as "The Day Out", she removed the specificity of Mary's Mary Poppins' age, but the Banks children remained mostly absent.



* GoodIsNotNice: Mary.

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* GoodIsNotNice: Mary.Mary Poppins.



* InexplicablyAwesome: Mary is a classic example.

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* InexplicablyAwesome: Mary Poppins is a classic example.



* {{Interquel}}: P.L. Travers explains in the introduction to ''Mary Poppins in the Park'' that the stories within happened during Mary's stays in the first three books. Since the books written from the 1960s through the '80s do not begin with Mary Poppins making a dramatic entrance back into the Banks' lives, these probably take place during those visits as well.

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* {{Interquel}}: P.L. Travers explains in the introduction to ''Mary Poppins in the Park'' that the stories within happened during Mary's Mary Poppins' stays in the first three books. Since the books written from the 1960s through the '80s do not begin with Mary Poppins her making a dramatic entrance back into the Banks' lives, these probably take place during those visits as well.



** ''Mary Poppins in the Park'' reveals one of Jane's plasticine figures, Samuel Mo, as another of Mary's cousins.

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** ''Mary Poppins in the Park'' reveals one of Jane's plasticine figures, Samuel Mo, as another of Mary's Mary Poppins' cousins.



* MisterMuffykins: Andrew, the spoiled and pampered lapdog of the rich and elderly Miss Lark. He is revealed to absolutely hate this treatment and wish for a simpler dog's life. And with Mary Poppin's help, he gets it.

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* MisterMuffykins: Andrew, the spoiled and pampered lapdog of the rich and elderly Miss Lark. He is revealed to absolutely hate this treatment and wish for a simpler dog's life. And with Mary Poppin's Poppins' help, he gets it.



** ''Mary Poppins'' ends with Jane receiving a letter from Mary signed, "Au revoir," explained as French for, "To meet again."

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** ''Mary Poppins'' ends with Jane receiving a letter from Mary Poppins signed, "Au revoir," explained as French for, "To meet again."
22nd Dec '16 7:25:32 AM dsneybuf
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[[quoteright:290:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/marypoppins-book_114.jpg]]



[[quoteright:290:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/marypoppins-book_114.jpg]]
22nd Jul '16 9:38:04 AM Omeganian
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Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationalModesty: Neleus is naked in the book, and once he returns to his place, One person remarks it's good someone gave him a coat. The Soviet movie has him clothed from the start, and it is instead remarked he has a book now.
22nd Mar '16 5:18:42 PM dsneybuf
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* TeleportersAndTransporters: Mary Poppins' compass (which becomes Michael's shortly before Mary Poppins' first departure) can teleport its user(s) to the any of the four corners of the world.

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* TeleportersAndTransporters: {{Teleportation}}: Mary Poppins' compass (which becomes Michael's shortly before Mary Poppins' first departure) can teleport its user(s) to the any of the four corners of the world.
8th Feb '16 10:18:03 AM dsneybuf
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19th Nov '15 11:46:28 AM dsneybuf
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''Mary Poppins'' is a children's book by P.L. Travers, with seven sequels.

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''Mary Poppins'' is a children's book written and illustrated by P.L. Travers, Travers and Mary Shepard, respectively, with seven sequels.


Added DiffLines:

* CoversAlwaysLie: The covers of the [[http://www.hmhco.com/shop/books/Mary-Poppins-Boxed-Set/9780544456839 2015 reprints]] of the first four books make Mary Poppins look more like Disney's version than Travers' and Shepard's.
18th Nov '15 9:56:27 PM dsneybuf
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Added DiffLines:

* TookALevelInKindness: Relatively speaking, Mary Poppins speaks and acts less harshly towards the children in the later books.
10th Nov '15 10:35:02 AM dsneybuf
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* RefugeeFromTVLand: ''Mary Poppins in the Park'' has a variation, in which three fairy-tale princes and their unicorn meet Jane and Michael. They claim to have a book about the people of Cherry Tree Lane, which they use as a PortalBook to the park once every generation (London time). Unfortunately, when most of the children the princes meet over the years become adults, they seem to forget meeting the trio.

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* RefugeeFromTVLand: ''Mary Poppins in the Park'' has a variation, in which three fairy-tale princes and their unicorn meet Jane and Michael. They claim to have a book about the people of Cherry Tree Lane, which they use as a PortalBook to the park Lane once every generation (London time). Unfortunately, when most of the children the princes meet over the years become adults, they seem to forget meeting the trio.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.MaryPoppins