History Literature / ManAfterManAnAnthropologyOfTheFuture

17th May '16 3:20:04 PM Morgenthaler
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* DarkerAndEdgier : Compared to Dixon's previous speculative biology books, ''AfterManAZoologyOfTheFuture'' and ''The New Dinosaurs''. The far darker and horror-like tone of the book caused some pretty big backlash from those who were expecting something similar to the previous two.

to:

* DarkerAndEdgier : Compared to Dixon's previous speculative biology books, ''AfterManAZoologyOfTheFuture'' ''Literature/AfterManAZoologyOfTheFuture'' and ''The New Dinosaurs''. The far darker and horror-like tone of the book caused some pretty big backlash from those who were expecting something similar to the previous two.
20th Apr '16 8:33:12 PM Berrenta
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* GaiasLament: Most modern animals are extinct. Fortunately, ItGetsBetter when the Hiteks engineer new human species to fill these vacant ecological niches.

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* GaiasLament: Most modern animals are extinct. Fortunately, ItGetsBetter things improve when the Hiteks engineer new human species to fill these vacant ecological niches.
13th Oct '15 3:44:57 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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''Man After Man: An Anthropology of the Future'' (1990) is the third [[SpeculativeDocumentary speculative evolution]] book written by Scottish geologist Creator/DougalDixon, and the most controversial instalment of the trio. Allegedly a science-fiction account of future human evolution, the premise and its accompanying illustrations can come off as disturbing. Unlike Dixon's previous two outings, this book deliberately ignores the laws of evolution, biology, and genetics when the plot calls for it; these contrivances are not helped by the unsettling pictures and imagery that accompany the posthumans of the distant future. Also unlike Dixon's previous two books, this one has a narrative component and focuses on individuals across time rather than entire species, even giving them individual names.

to:

''Man After Man: An Anthropology of the Future'' (1990) is the third [[SpeculativeDocumentary speculative evolution]] book written by Scottish geologist Creator/DougalDixon, and the most controversial instalment installment of the trio. Allegedly a science-fiction account of future human evolution, the premise and its accompanying illustrations can come off as disturbing. Unlike Dixon's previous two outings, this book deliberately ignores the laws of evolution, biology, and genetics when the plot calls for it; these contrivances are not helped by the unsettling pictures and imagery that accompany the posthumans of the distant future. Also unlike Dixon's previous two books, this one has a narrative component and focuses on individuals across time rather than entire species, even giving them individual names.
13th Oct '15 3:44:21 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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** This also includes the Vacuumorphs, exoskeletal Humans that are used as [[OrganicTechnology living space scouting probes]] that have all of their vulnerable parts sealed up so they can survive the natural elements of outer space without the need of a ship. [[OffscreenInertia And since its never mentioned]] no one from Earth retrieves them. In other words Vacuumorphs are [[BlessedWithSuck cursed]] with staying in space without any way of directly seeing or communicating with the outside universe (except through their surgically attached planetary surveying equipment) and are ([[FridgeHorror Presumably]]) forced to consume nothing but their own recycled natural waste until finally accidentally falling towards and burning up in a random planets atmosphere. They cannot even travel through space- it is stated that are high-orbit space ship engineers only. Their bodies cannot operate or even survive in gravity at all - and that includes the artificial gravity of an accelerating space ship. They're stuck in near-Earth space.

to:

** This also includes the Vacuumorphs, exoskeletal Humans that are used as [[OrganicTechnology living space scouting probes]] that have all of their vulnerable parts sealed up so they can survive the natural elements of outer space without the need of a ship. [[OffscreenInertia And since its never mentioned]] no one from Earth retrieves them. In other words Vacuumorphs are [[BlessedWithSuck cursed]] with staying in space without any way of directly seeing or communicating with the outside universe (except through their surgically attached planetary surveying equipment) and are ([[FridgeHorror Presumably]]) presumably]]) forced to consume nothing but their own recycled natural waste until finally accidentally falling towards and burning up in a random planets atmosphere. They cannot even travel through space- it is stated that are high-orbit space ship engineers only. Their bodies cannot operate or even survive in gravity at all - and that includes the artificial gravity of an accelerating space ship. They're stuck in near-Earth space.
13th Oct '15 1:26:49 AM Morgenthaler
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[[quoteright:200:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/manafterman2_9038.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:200:"Two creatures - a single ancestor."]]

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[[quoteright:200:http://static.[[quoteright:183:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/manafterman2_9038.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:200:"Two [[caption-width-right:183:"Two creatures - a single ancestor."]]
27th Aug '15 7:57:45 AM Sharlee
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Unfortunately, a century later, environmental deterioration finally kills off most of the planet's fauna. Humanity is (inexplicably) one of the only species left standing and so a faction of the survivors (a [[{{Cyborg}} cybernetically enhanced]] offshoot known as the Hitek) begin to create new Biotech Human species for the next 500 years en masse to fill in some of critical ecosystemic niches left by the general absence of the Earth's now countless extinct animal species. Meanwhile some of the remnants of unaltered humans decide to leave the wrecked earth and return when it gets well...better, while others, without the benefit of technology, return to barbarism and later a form of civilization again.

to:

Unfortunately, a century later, environmental deterioration finally kills off most of the planet's fauna. Humanity is (inexplicably) one of the only species left standing and so a faction of the survivors (a [[{{Cyborg}} cybernetically enhanced]] offshoot known as the Hitek) begin to create new Biotech Human species for the next 500 years en masse to fill in some of critical ecosystemic niches left by the general absence of the Earth's now countless extinct animal species. Meanwhile some of the remnants of unaltered humans decide to leave the wrecked earth and return when it gets well...better, while others, without the benefit of technology, return to barbarism and later start to build a form of civilization again.
21st Feb '15 9:37:52 AM poi99
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* DarkerAndEdgier : Compared to Dixon's previous speculative biology books, ''AfterManAZoologyOfTheFuture'' and ''The New Dinosaurs''. The far darker and horror-like tone of the book caused some pretty big FanDisservice for those who were expecting something similar to the previous two.

to:

* DarkerAndEdgier : Compared to Dixon's previous speculative biology books, ''AfterManAZoologyOfTheFuture'' and ''The New Dinosaurs''. The far darker and horror-like tone of the book caused some pretty big FanDisservice for backlash from those who were expecting something similar to the previous two.
29th Jan '15 12:47:35 PM Locoman
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''Man After Man: An Anthropology of the Future'' (1990) is a [[SpeculativeDocumentary speculative evolution]] book written by Scottish geologist Creator/DougalDixon. The book is allegedly a science-fiction account of future human evolution, although the story and its accompanying illustrations can come off as disturbing. Unlike Dixon's previous two outings, this book deliberately ignores the laws of evolution, biology, and genetics when the plot calls for it; these contrivances are not helped by the unsettling pictures and imagery that accompany the posthumans of the distant future. Also unlike Dixon's previous two books, this one has a narrative component and focuses on individuals across time rather than entire species, even giving them individual names.

to:

''Man After Man: An Anthropology of the Future'' (1990) is a the third [[SpeculativeDocumentary speculative evolution]] book written by Scottish geologist Creator/DougalDixon. The book is allegedly Creator/DougalDixon, and the most controversial instalment of the trio. Allegedly a science-fiction account of future human evolution, although the story premise and its accompanying illustrations can come off as disturbing. Unlike Dixon's previous two outings, this book deliberately ignores the laws of evolution, biology, and genetics when the plot calls for it; these contrivances are not helped by the unsettling pictures and imagery that accompany the posthumans of the distant future. Also unlike Dixon's previous two books, this one has a narrative component and focuses on individuals across time rather than entire species, even giving them individual names.
28th Jan '15 3:27:57 PM Locoman
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''Man After Man: An Anthropology of the Future'' (1990) is a [[SpeculativeDocumentary speculative evolution]] book written by Scottish geologist Creator/DougalDixon. The book is a horror-based exploration of humanoid monsters created in a sci-fi future. Despite its seemingly scientific pretext, the book's notions of evolution, genetics, and common sense are all extremely flawed, and ultimately exist only as a rationalization for the highly disturbing illustrations. Unlike Dixon's previous two books, his story context focuses on individuals rather than entire species, even giving them human names.

to:

''Man After Man: An Anthropology of the Future'' (1990) is a [[SpeculativeDocumentary speculative evolution]] book written by Scottish geologist Creator/DougalDixon. The book is allegedly a horror-based exploration science-fiction account of humanoid monsters created in a sci-fi future. Despite its seemingly scientific pretext, the book's notions of future human evolution, genetics, although the story and common sense are all extremely flawed, and ultimately exist only its accompanying illustrations can come off as a rationalization for the highly disturbing illustrations. disturbing. Unlike Dixon's previous two outings, this book deliberately ignores the laws of evolution, biology, and genetics when the plot calls for it; these contrivances are not helped by the unsettling pictures and imagery that accompany the posthumans of the distant future. Also unlike Dixon's previous two books, his story context this one has a narrative component and focuses on individuals across time rather than entire species, even giving them human individual names.


Added DiffLines:

* BeePeople: The Plains-Dwellers slowly develop increasingly organized social structures as the climate changes; by the end of the book their descendants are completely eusocial and united under a few queens.
13th Jan '15 12:44:54 PM Sheora
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''Man After Man: An Anthropology of the Future'' (1990) is a [[SpeculativeDocumentary speculative evolution]] book written by Scottish geologist DougalDixon. The book is a horror-based exploration of humanoid monsters created in a sci-fi future. Despite its seemingly scientific pretext, the book's notions of evolution, genetics, and common sense are all extremely flawed, and ultimately exist only as a rationalization for the highly disturbing illustrations. Unlike Dixon's previous two books, his story context focuses on individuals rather than entire species, even giving them human names.

to:

''Man After Man: An Anthropology of the Future'' (1990) is a [[SpeculativeDocumentary speculative evolution]] book written by Scottish geologist DougalDixon.Creator/DougalDixon. The book is a horror-based exploration of humanoid monsters created in a sci-fi future. Despite its seemingly scientific pretext, the book's notions of evolution, genetics, and common sense are all extremely flawed, and ultimately exist only as a rationalization for the highly disturbing illustrations. Unlike Dixon's previous two books, his story context focuses on individuals rather than entire species, even giving them human names.
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