History Literature / MagicKingdomOfLandover

10th Aug '17 11:48:46 AM SeptimusHeap
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* JailbaitWait[=/=]{{Lolicon}}: While it was all one-sided, at least at first, there is something mildly disturbing about Elizabeth's feelings for Abernathy, particularly since they began when she was quite young and he was ''still a dog'', even if she did wait until they met again (and she was of legal age) to pursue it...

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* JailbaitWait[=/=]{{Lolicon}}: JailbaitWait: While it was all one-sided, at least at first, there is something mildly disturbing about Elizabeth's feelings for Abernathy, particularly since they began when she was quite young and he was ''still a dog'', even if she did wait until they met again (and she was of legal age) to pursue it...
10th Mar '17 3:06:34 AM Ingonyama
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* CatsAreSuperior: Edgewood Dirk.

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* CatsAreSuperior: Edgewood Dirk. (Sensing a theme here?)
8th Mar '17 8:34:47 AM CrypticMirror
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* AmnesiaEpisode: The central plot of "The Tangle Box" novel, where King Ben, evil sorceress Nightshade, and dragon Strabo are all trapped in the titular box and stripped of their memories. Made awkward because Amnesia-Ben and Amnesia-Nightshade start to fall in love, when they are normally very bitter enemies.
6th Feb '17 12:36:17 AM PuffyTreat
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* TheChosenOne: A subversion: after several dozen failed kings, Ben is the only one who can summon the Paladin. This is not, however, because Ben is the chosen one. He is able to succeed where his predecessors failed not because he is the chosen one, but primarily because he was just too stubborn to give up, which was partly because he had nothing to lose. In theory, however, there might have been any number of people who could have succeeded in Ben's place. The problem was that Meeks was deliberately selecting men he was confident would give up quite readily.

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* TheChosenOne: A subversion: after several dozen failed kings, Ben is the only one who can summon the Paladin. This is not, however, because Ben is the chosen one. He is able to succeed where his predecessors failed not because he is the chosen one, but primarily because he was just too stubborn to give up, which was partly because he had nothing to lose. In theory, however, there might have been any number of people who could have succeeded in Ben's place. The problem was that Meeks was deliberately selecting men he was confident would give up quite readily. [[spoiler: And, as Questor finally admits to Ben, the few previous ones who didn't give up, well, he finally figured out that Meeks was making sure that even if the Mark didn't kill them, they'd still meet a nasty fate by...other means.]]
9th Oct '16 9:56:24 PM Ingonyama
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* RightForTheWrongReasons: In the first book, Ben is initially convinced that the advert to purchase a magic kingdom is a scam for the obvious reason. He eventually learns that it is a scam -- not because the kingdom doesn't exist, but because it's beset by enemies and what he's bought is less "permanent vacation to fairyland" and more "full time job that will kill him if he doesn't do it exactly right". Each time the seller simply waits the new king to be killed and puts it back on the market.

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* RightForTheWrongReasons: In the first book, Ben is initially convinced that the advert to purchase a magic kingdom is a scam for the obvious reason. He eventually learns that it is a scam -- not because the kingdom doesn't exist, but because it's beset by enemies and what he's bought is less "permanent vacation to fairyland" and more "full time job that will kill him if he doesn't do it exactly right". Each time the seller simply waits for the new king to be killed and puts it back on the market.
9th Oct '16 9:48:56 PM Ingonyama
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** Only ''Witches' Brew'' seems to avoid this, since the whole plot with Rydall and Mistaya's kidnapping pretty much happens all at once, with Questor and Abernathy's later disappearance just seeming to be a minor side issue until their BigDamnHeroes moment.

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** Only ''Witches' Brew'' seems and ''Princess of Landover'' seem to avoid this, since the this. The whole plot with Rydall and Mistaya's kidnapping pretty much happens all at once, with Questor and Abernathy's later disappearance just seeming to be a minor side issue until their BigDamnHeroes moment.moment. And both Crabbit's plan at Libiris and Laphroig's intentions for Mistaya are revealed gradually (rather than one horrible thing after another early on) and have nothing to do with each other until the VillainTeamUp near the end.
9th Oct '16 9:46:15 PM Ingonyama
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* BalefulPolymorph: What happened to Abernathy in {{Backstory}}, courtesy of a MagicMisfire from Questor (to protect him from Michel Ard Rhi). End result is a scribe who is a soft-coated Wheaten Terrier, luckily still retaining human hands and the ability to speak. Nightshade gets trapped in her crow form at the end of ''Witches Brew''.

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* BalefulPolymorph: BalefulPolymorph:
**
What happened to Abernathy in {{Backstory}}, courtesy of a MagicMisfire from Questor (to protect him from Michel Ard Rhi). End result is a scribe who is a soft-coated Wheaten Terrier, luckily still retaining human hands and the ability to speak.
**
Nightshade gets trapped in her crow form at the end of ''Witches Brew''.



* FromBadToWorse: The very first book sets up a situation where each thing Ben learns about the supposedly wonderful fantasy of ruling a magical kingdom is worse than the last. His only loyal followers are an IneptMage, a TalkingAnimal scribe, and two monkeys; the castle and land are dying thanks to there being no true king for so long; none of the people will follow him; a dragon is laying waste to the countryside, which he must put a stop to if he wants the lords' allegiance, which he in turn needs if he wants the River Master's; the Paladin has seemingly deserted the kingdom; Nightshade is plotting to take over; oh, and the Iron Mark has sworn the king to a DuelToTheDeath.

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* FromBadToWorse: FromBadToWorse:
**
The very first book sets up a situation where each thing Ben learns about the supposedly wonderful fantasy of ruling a magical kingdom is worse than the last. His only loyal followers are an IneptMage, a TalkingAnimal scribe, and two monkeys; the castle and land are dying thanks to there being no true king for so long; none of the people will follow him; a dragon is laying waste to the countryside, which he must put a stop to if he wants the lords' allegiance, which he in turn needs if he wants the River Master's; the Paladin has seemingly deserted the kingdom; Nightshade is plotting to take over; oh, and the Iron Mark has sworn the king to a DuelToTheDeath.



** And in ''The Tangle Box'', Horris Kew accidentally unleashing the Gorse not only gets Ben, Nightshade, and Strabo imprisoned and amnesiac together, it lets the Gorse mislead and manipulate the people through the mind's eye crystals, then prepare to unleash the demons of Abaddon. Only ''Witches' Brew'' seems to avoid this, since the whole plot with Rydall and Mistaya's kidnapping pretty much happens all at once, with Questor and Abernathy's later disappearance just seeming to be a minor side issue until their BigDamnHeroes moment.

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** And in ''The Tangle Box'', Horris Kew accidentally unleashing the Gorse not only gets Ben, Nightshade, and Strabo imprisoned and amnesiac together, it lets the Gorse mislead and manipulate the people through the mind's eye crystals, then prepare to unleash the demons of Abaddon.
**
Only ''Witches' Brew'' seems to avoid this, since the whole plot with Rydall and Mistaya's kidnapping pretty much happens all at once, with Questor and Abernathy's later disappearance just seeming to be a minor side issue until their BigDamnHeroes moment.
9th Oct '16 9:39:05 PM Ingonyama
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* AbhorrentAdmirer: In ''A Princess of Landover'', Mistaya is proposed to by the odious Lord Laphroaig, who has been nicknamed "The Frog" for his habit of darting his tongue out of his lips when nervous and his squat body. Besides being ugly, Laphroaig's wives and children have a habit of dying from "mysterious illnesses". Correctly, Mistaya assumes Laphroaig only wishes to marry her in order to have access to Landover's throne.

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* AbhorrentAdmirer: In ''A Princess of Landover'', Mistaya is proposed to by the odious Lord Laphroaig, Laphroig, who has been nicknamed "The Frog" for his habit of darting his tongue out of his lips when nervous and his squat body. Besides being ugly, Laphroaig's Laphroig's wives and children have a habit of dying from "mysterious illnesses". Correctly, Mistaya assumes Laphroaig Laphroig only wishes to marry her in order to have access to Landover's throne.
4th Aug '16 2:59:57 AM PaulA
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* AbhorrentAdmirer: In ''A Princess of Landover'', Mistaya is proposed to by the odious Lord Laphroaig, who has been nicknamed "The Frog" for his habit of darting his tongue out of his lips when nervous and his squat body. Besides being ugly, Laphroaig's wives and children have a habit of dying from "mysterious illnesses". Correctly, Mistaya assumes Laphroaig only wishes to marry her in order to have access to Landover's throne.



* DarkWorld: Abaddon is this to Landover.



* EvilIsNotAToy: In ''The Tangle Box'', Horris Kew and Biggar release the Gorse from its prison, and it enslaves them with the intent to send them down the Box when they are no longer useful.



* FakeKing: In ''The Black Unicorn'', King Benjamin is replaced by a doppelganger with evil intentions.



* FisherKing: Something of this comes through in the connection between Sterling Silver and the kings of Landover--since after being left abandoned, without a proper ruler on the throne, she ends up suffering from the Tarnish, an effect which not only turns her into "Castle Dracula" as Ben puts it, but spreads out into the countryside, killing the Bonnie Blues and generally poisoning the land. It fades and she is restored to her former glory when all the threats to Landover are ended or neutralized and Ben has proven his worthiness for the throne.

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* FisherKing: Something of this comes through in the connection between the palace Sterling Silver and the kings of Landover--since after being left abandoned, without a proper ruler on the throne, she ends up suffering from the Tarnish, an effect which not only turns her into "Castle Dracula" as Ben puts it, but spreads out into the countryside, killing the Bonnie Blues and generally poisoning the land. It fades and she is restored to her former glory when all the threats to Landover are ended or neutralized and Ben has proven his worthiness for the throne.


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* GeniusLoci:
** The castle Sterling Silver is alive and aware, its purpose in life to shelter and protect the High King and his household.
** The royal library Libiris has similar properties, being descended, as it were, from Sterling Silver.


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* MagicLibrarian: Craswell Crabbit in ''A Princess of Landover''.
* MagicMisfire: This happens all the time to Questor Thews.


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* MultiversalConqueror: In ''Witches Brew'', Rydall of Marnhull claims to be one of these, planning to make Landover his next conquest. [[spoiler:Turns out he's actually a local nobleman, working with Nightshade to overthrow Ben]].


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* SecretHandshake: In ''A Princess of Landover'', the two G'home Gnomes have an elaborate secret handshake so that no one else can pretend to be them (leading Mistaya to wonder why anyone would ''want'' [[ButtMonkey to be them]]).


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* SpookySilentLibrary: Libiris.
4th Aug '16 2:35:28 AM PaulA
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* RightForTheWrongReason: In the first book, Ben is initially convinced that the advert to purchase a magic kingdom is a scam for the obvious reason. He eventually learns that it is a scam -- not because the kingdom doesn't exist, but because it's beset by enemies and what he's bought is less "permanent vacation to fairyland" and more "full time job that will kill him if he doesn't do it exactly right". Each time the seller simply waits the new king to be killed and puts it back on the market.

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* RightForTheWrongReason: RightForTheWrongReasons: In the first book, Ben is initially convinced that the advert to purchase a magic kingdom is a scam for the obvious reason. He eventually learns that it is a scam -- not because the kingdom doesn't exist, but because it's beset by enemies and what he's bought is less "permanent vacation to fairyland" and more "full time job that will kill him if he doesn't do it exactly right". Each time the seller simply waits the new king to be killed and puts it back on the market.
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