History Literature / MASH

28th Feb '16 9:58:02 PM Mdumas43073
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'''''MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors''''' -- the original novel that inspired the film ''Film/{{MASH}}'' and TV series ''Series/{{MASH}}'' and ''Series/AfterMash'' -- was written by H. Richard Hornberger under the pen name Richard Hooker, himself a former military surgeon, and was about a fictional U.S. Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in Korea during UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar. It was originally published in 1968.

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'''''MASH: ''MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors''''' Doctors'' -- the original novel that inspired the film ''Film/{{MASH}}'' and TV series ''Series/{{MASH}}'' and ''Series/AfterMash'' -- was written by H. Richard Hornberger under the pen name Richard Hooker, himself a former military surgeon, and was about a fictional U.S. Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in Korea during UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar. It was originally published in 1968.
12th Nov '15 1:44:40 AM KenKevinStriker
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'''''MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors''''' -- the original novel that inspired the film ''Film/{{MASH}}'' and TV series ''Series/{{MASH}}'' and ''Series/AfterMash'' -- was written by Richard Hooker, himself a former military surgeon, and was about a fictional U.S. Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in Korea during UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar. It was originally published in 1968.

to:

'''''MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors''''' -- the original novel that inspired the film ''Film/{{MASH}}'' and TV series ''Series/{{MASH}}'' and ''Series/AfterMash'' -- was written by H. Richard Hornberger under the pen name Richard Hooker, himself a former military surgeon, and was about a fictional U.S. Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in Korea during UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar. It was originally published in 1968.
8th Mar '14 8:14:35 PM mlsmithca
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Plot summary

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Plot summary[[AC:Plot summary]]



Captain Waldowski, the dentist known as the Painless Pole, who has a pool table and a poker table (open 24 hours), suddenly becomes depressed and decides to commit suicide. (He's chronically depressed and has a fit of depression every month) Duke gives him a "black capsule" to knock him out, a mock Last Supper is arranged and everybody bids him farewell. The next day he is feeling better and ready for a game of poker.

to:

Captain Waldowski, the dentist known as the Painless Pole, who has a pool table and a poker table (open 24 hours), suddenly becomes depressed and decides to commit suicide. (He's chronically depressed and has a fit of depression every month) month.) Duke gives him a "black capsule" to knock him out, a mock Last Supper is arranged and everybody bids him farewell. The next day he is feeling better and ready for a game of poker.



Summer arrives and the 4077th is hot and overworked. The work slacks off and while Henry is sent to Tokyo for three weeks, Colonel Horace DeLong fills in. Col. DeLong finds Hawkeye at the poker game and demands that he start surgery on a patient in the preoperative ward. Hawkeye says that the patient is receiving blood and that he will do the surgery at 3:00am. At 2:45, while scrubbing for surgery, Hawkeye explains that the waiting period was necessary for the patient to become fit for surgery. When the Swampmen get bored, to get away for a few days they lead DeLong to believe they need psychiatric evaluation. At the 325th Evac, they escape and the psychiatrist, accompanied by Henry, finds them at Mrs. Lee's (a nearby whorehouse).

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Summer arrives and the 4077th is hot and overworked. The work slacks off and while Henry is sent to Tokyo for three weeks, Colonel Horace DeLong [=DeLong=] fills in. Col. DeLong [=DeLong=] finds Hawkeye at the poker game and demands that he start surgery on a patient in the preoperative ward. Hawkeye says that the patient is receiving blood and that he will do the surgery at 3:00am. At 2:45, while scrubbing for surgery, Hawkeye explains that the waiting period was necessary for the patient to become fit for surgery. When the Swampmen get bored, to get away for a few days they lead DeLong [=DeLong=] to believe they need psychiatric evaluation. At the 325th Evac, they escape and the psychiatrist, accompanied by Henry, finds them at Mrs. Lee's (a nearby whorehouse).



'''Editing note:''' If you intend to place a link to this page on other pages, you must type "Literature/Mash" (capital M, lower-case a-s-h) inside double-curly brackets ("{{}}").



Hooker wrote the first sequel, M*A*S*H Goes to Maine in 1972, covering the lives of the surgeons after they returned home from the war.

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Hooker wrote the first sequel, M*A*S*H ''M*A*S*H Goes to Maine Maine'', in 1972, covering the lives of the surgeons after they returned home from the war.



After the success of the M*A*S*H TV series, novels credited to Hooker and William E. Butterworth appeared, beginning with M*A*S*H Goes to Paris in 1974. Although credited to Hooker and Butterworth, they may have been ghostwritten entirely by Butterworth.

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After the success of the M*A*S*H ''M*A*S*H'' TV series, novels credited to Hooker and William E. Butterworth appeared, beginning with M*A*S*H ''M*A*S*H Goes to Paris Paris'' in 1974. Although credited to Hooker and Butterworth, they may have been ghostwritten entirely by Butterworth.



After the conclusion of the "Butterworth" series with 1977's M*A*S*H Goes to Montreal, Hooker wrote a final "M*A*S*H" novel, M*A*S*H Mania, which jettisoned the plots of the intervening novels and picked up where M*A*S*H Goes to Maine left off.

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After the conclusion of the "Butterworth" series with 1977's M*A*S*H ''M*A*S*H Goes to Montreal, Montreal'', Hooker wrote a final "M*A*S*H" novel, M*A*S*H Mania, ''M*A*S*H Mania'', which jettisoned the plots of the intervening novels and picked up where M*A*S*H ''M*A*S*H Goes to Maine Maine'' left off.



# M*A*S*H: A Novel About Three Army Doctors (1968)
# M*A*S*H Goes to Maine (1972)
# M*A*S*H Mania (1977)

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# M*A*S*H: ''M*A*S*H: A Novel About Three Army Doctors Doctors'' (1968)
# M*A*S*H ''M*A*S*H Goes to Maine Maine'' (1972)
# M*A*S*H Mania ''M*A*S*H Mania'' (1977)



# M*A*S*H Goes to Paris (1974}
# M*A*S*H Goes to New Orleans (1975)
# M*A*S*H Goes to London (1975)
# M*A*S*H Goes to Vienna (1976)
# M*A*S*H Goes to San Francisco (1976)
# M*A*S*H Goes to Morocco (1976)
# M*A*S*H Goes to Miami (1976)
# M*A*S*H Goes to Las Vegas (1976)
# M*A*S*H Goes to Hollywood (1976)
# M*A*S*H Goes to Texas (1977)
# M*A*S*H Goes to Moscow (1977)
# M*A*S*H Goes to Montreal (1977)

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# M*A*S*H ''M*A*S*H Goes to Paris Paris'' (1974}
# M*A*S*H ''M*A*S*H Goes to New Orleans Orleans'' (1975)
# M*A*S*H ''M*A*S*H Goes to London London'' (1975)
# M*A*S*H ''M*A*S*H Goes to Vienna Vienna'' (1976)
# M*A*S*H ''M*A*S*H Goes to San Francisco Francisco'' (1976)
# M*A*S*H ''M*A*S*H Goes to Morocco Morocco'' (1976)
# M*A*S*H ''M*A*S*H Goes to Miami Miami'' (1976)
# M*A*S*H ''M*A*S*H Goes to Las Vegas Vegas'' (1976)
# M*A*S*H ''M*A*S*H Goes to Hollywood Hollywood'' (1976)
# M*A*S*H ''M*A*S*H Goes to Texas Texas'' (1977)
# M*A*S*H ''M*A*S*H Goes to Moscow Moscow'' (1977)
# M*A*S*H ''M*A*S*H Goes to Montreal Montreal'' (1977)
25th Sep '13 6:02:53 PM StFan
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'''''MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors'''''' -- the original novel that inspired the film ''Film/{{MASH}}'' and TV series ''Series/{{MASH}}'' and ''Series/AfterMash'' -- was written by Richard Hooker, himself a former military surgeon, and was about a fictional U.S. Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in Korea during UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar. It was originally published in 1968.

to:

'''''MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors'''''' Doctors''''' -- the original novel that inspired the film ''Film/{{MASH}}'' and TV series ''Series/{{MASH}}'' and ''Series/AfterMash'' -- was written by Richard Hooker, himself a former military surgeon, and was about a fictional U.S. Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in Korea during UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar. It was originally published in 1968.
25th Sep '13 6:02:33 PM StFan
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''MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors''--the original novel that inspired the film ''Film/{{MASH}}'' and TV series ''Series/{{Mash}}'' and ''Series/AfterMash''--was written by Richard Hooker, himself a former military surgeon, and was about a fictional U.S. Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in Korea during UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar. It was originally published in 1968.

to:

''MASH: '''''MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors''--the Doctors'''''' -- the original novel that inspired the film ''Film/{{MASH}}'' and TV series ''Series/{{Mash}}'' ''Series/{{MASH}}'' and ''Series/AfterMash''--was ''Series/AfterMash'' -- was written by Richard Hooker, himself a former military surgeon, and was about a fictional U.S. Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in Korea during UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar. It was originally published in 1968.
4th Aug '13 10:45:27 PM Korodzik
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For example, Hawkeye went from being a conservative to a liberal, as well as gradually losing his zany sense of humor as played by Alan Alda in the television series. The character was also changed from being married with children to a single man[[hottip:*:apparently this was done by demand of CBS, who was already antsy about having Trapper John be married and fooling around, and they did not want "a show wholly about adultery."]]. Similarly, characters such as Hot Lips and Radar lost the edge they had in the novel, film and earlier episodes of the television series. Radar, in particular, suffered tremendously from {{Flanderization}}, going from a slightly naive, yet worldly character (one who played poker, drank Blake's whisky on the sly and smoked cigars) and into one who was little more than a sympathetic manchild (who blanched at the thought of smoking and drank only Grape Nehi).

to:

For example, Hawkeye went from being a conservative to a liberal, as well as gradually losing his zany sense of humor as played by Alan Alda in the television series. The character was also changed from being married with children to a single man[[hottip:*:apparently man[[note]]apparently this was done by demand of CBS, who was already antsy about having Trapper John be married and fooling around, and they did not want "a show wholly about adultery."]]."[[/note]]. Similarly, characters such as Hot Lips and Radar lost the edge they had in the novel, film and earlier episodes of the television series. Radar, in particular, suffered tremendously from {{Flanderization}}, going from a slightly naive, yet worldly character (one who played poker, drank Blake's whisky on the sly and smoked cigars) and into one who was little more than a sympathetic manchild (who blanched at the thought of smoking and drank only Grape Nehi).
12th Apr '13 1:21:09 PM MarkLungo
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''MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors''--the original novel that inspired the film ''Film/{{MASH}}'' and TV series ''{{Series/Mash}}'' and ''Series/AfterMash''--was written by Richard Hooker, himself a former military surgeon, and was about a fictional U.S. Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in Korea during the Korean War. It was originally published in 1968.

to:

''MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors''--the original novel that inspired the film ''Film/{{MASH}}'' and TV series ''{{Series/Mash}}'' ''Series/{{Mash}}'' and ''Series/AfterMash''--was written by Richard Hooker, himself a former military surgeon, and was about a fictional U.S. Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in Korea during the Korean War.UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar. It was originally published in 1968.
11th Apr '13 2:04:39 AM Xtifr
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''MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors'' -- the original novel that inspired the film ''Film/{{MASH}}'' and TV series ''{{Series/Mash}}'' and ''Series/AfterMash'' -- was written by Richard Hooker, himself a former military surgeon, and was about a fictional U.S. Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in Korea during the Korean War. It was originally published in 1968.

to:

''MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors'' -- the Doctors''--the original novel that inspired the film ''Film/{{MASH}}'' and TV series ''{{Series/Mash}}'' and ''Series/AfterMash'' -- was ''Series/AfterMash''--was written by Richard Hooker, himself a former military surgeon, and was about a fictional U.S. Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in Korea during the Korean War. It was originally published in 1968.
11th Apr '13 2:04:24 AM Xtifr
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'''''MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors''''' -- the original novel that inspired the film ''Film/{{MASH}}'' and TV series ''{{Series/Mash}}'' and ''Series/AfterMash'' -- was written by Richard Hooker, himself a former military surgeon, and was about a fictional U.S. Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in Korea during the Korean War. It was originally published in 1968.

to:

'''''MASH: ''MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors''''' Doctors'' -- the original novel that inspired the film ''Film/{{MASH}}'' and TV series ''{{Series/Mash}}'' and ''Series/AfterMash'' -- was written by Richard Hooker, himself a former military surgeon, and was about a fictional U.S. Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in Korea during the Korean War. It was originally published in 1968.
21st Aug '12 3:03:25 PM LentilSandEater
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For example, Hawkeye went from being a conservative to a liberal, as well as gradually losing his zany sense of humor as played by Alan Alda in the television series. The character was also changed from being married with children to a single man[[hottip:*:apparently this was done by demand of CBS, who was already antsy about having Trapper John be married and fooling around, and they did not want "a show wholly about adultery."]]. Similarly, characters such as Hot Lips and Radar lost the edge they had in the novel, film and earlier episodes of the television series. Radar, in particular, suffered tremendously from {{Flanderization}}, going from a slightly naive, yet worldly character (one who played poker, drank Blake's whisky on the sly and smoked cigars) and into onw who was little more than a sympathetic manchild (who blanched at the thought of smoking and drank only Grape Nehi).

to:

For example, Hawkeye went from being a conservative to a liberal, as well as gradually losing his zany sense of humor as played by Alan Alda in the television series. The character was also changed from being married with children to a single man[[hottip:*:apparently this was done by demand of CBS, who was already antsy about having Trapper John be married and fooling around, and they did not want "a show wholly about adultery."]]. Similarly, characters such as Hot Lips and Radar lost the edge they had in the novel, film and earlier episodes of the television series. Radar, in particular, suffered tremendously from {{Flanderization}}, going from a slightly naive, yet worldly character (one who played poker, drank Blake's whisky on the sly and smoked cigars) and into onw one who was little more than a sympathetic manchild (who blanched at the thought of smoking and drank only Grape Nehi).
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