History Literature / LordEdgwareDies

10th Dec '16 5:51:28 AM benda
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** The fact that Poirot was recommended to Duchess of Merton by Lady Yardly (a victim of theft in "The Adventure of the Western Star" short story) qualifies as well.



** A rare inverted version. [[spoiler: Into just about a third of the book, Hastings mentions that it was the last time he saw Jane Wilkinson, which hints at either her impending death or low plot relevance of her character after all. In fact, she is the murderer, and Hastings just had to leave Britain before her trial.]]

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** A rare inverted version. [[spoiler: Into just about a third of the book, Hastings mentions in passing that it was the last time he saw Jane Wilkinson, which hints at either her impending death murder or low plot relevance of her character after all. In fact, she is the murderer, and Hastings just had to leave Britain before her trial.]]
10th Dec '16 5:46:11 AM benda
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Added DiffLines:

** A rare inverted version. [[spoiler: Into just about a third of the book, Hastings mentions that it was the last time he saw Jane Wilkinson, which hints at either her impending death or low plot relevance of her character after all. In fact, she is the murderer, and Hastings just had to leave Britain before her trial.]]
14th Nov '16 4:39:03 AM yisfidri
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* RealLifeRelative: The TV adaptation exemplifies the IdenticalStranger phenomenon between Bryan Martin and Alton by having the two played by brothers Christopher and Dominic Guard.
14th Nov '16 4:34:58 AM yisfidri
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The story was adapted as a film called ''Thirteen at Dinner'' in 1985, starring Creator/PeterUstinov and Creator/FayeDunaway, and then in 2000 as part of Series/AgathaChristiesPoirot starring Creator/DavidSuchet.

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The story was adapted as a film called ''Thirteen at Dinner'' in 1985, starring Creator/PeterUstinov Peter Ustinov and Creator/FayeDunaway, Faye Dunaway, and then in 2000 as part of Series/AgathaChristiesPoirot ITV's ''{{Series/Poirot}}'' starring Creator/DavidSuchet.David Suchet.
14th Nov '16 4:33:07 AM yisfidri
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The story was adapted as a film called ''Thirteen at Dinner'' in 1985, starring Creator/PeterUstinov and Creator/FayeDunaway, and then in 2000 as part of Series/AgathaChristiesPoirot starring Creator/DavidSuchet.



!!This novel provides examples of the following:

to:

!!This !!The original novel provides examples of the following:



* AdaptationalAttractiveness: Inverted with Bryan Martin and Alton. The books consistently describe the two as incredibly young and handsome, especially the latter, whom Hastings compared to a Greek God and considers as "one of the handsomest young men [he's] ever seen". Their TV counterparts, while not necessarily ugly, are not as conventionally attractive, and wouldn't attract such gushes from other people.
* AdaptationalDyeJob: Genevieve "Jenny" Driver is mostly recognisable, in the books, from her distinctive red heir. In the adaptation, she's dark-haired.
* AdaptationalHeroism: Downplayed. Jane Wilkinson is described as a blatantly selfish individual who shamelessly brags about wanting to kill her husband so that she can marry another man, and refuses to take the hint when Poirot tries to refuse her commission to "get rid" of her husband. In the adaptation, she is portrayed (initially, anyway) as a sympathetic victim who is forced to silently endure her husband's cruelty, and her asking for Poirot's help looks more like a desperate plea than a callous asking.



* DeathByAdaptation: In the novels, [[spoiler:Alton the butler]] quietly disappears when the police started digging around and almost discovered [[spoiler:his stealing of his master's money]]. In the TV adaptation, the police intercepts him just as he was leaving the country, and he died in the ensuing chase.
* DubInducedPlotHole: The German translation of the book altered the plot point where the killer [[spoiler:tears an "s" off the corner of a letter to change "she" into "he" to make it look like a man was being written about]], because this would not work in German. It was replaced by [[spoiler:the tearing of an uppercase "J" (signifying "Jane") to turn it into a lowercase "j" (signifying "jemand", German for "someone"). The only problem with this is that a "j" is not gender-specific and does not justify the characters thinking that it must have been a man]].



* DubInducedPlotHole: The German translation of the book altered the plot point where the killer [[spoiler:tears an "s" off the corner of a letter to change "she" into "he" to make it look like a man was being written about]], because this would not work in German. It was replaced by [[spoiler:the tearing of an uppercase "J" (signifying "Jane") to turn it into a lowercase "j" (signifying "jemand", German for "someone"). The only problem with this is that a "j" is not gender-specific and does not justify the characters thinking that it must have been a man]].



* {{Foreshadowing}}: The David Suchet adaptation opens with a theater production in which Jane Wilkinson is playing [[spoiler:Lady Macbeth]].



* HeKnowsTooMuch: [[spoiler:Donald Ross and Carlotta Adams]] was murdered for knowing the fact that [[spoiler:the Lady Edgware that was in the party during the time of the murder was, in fact, an impersonator]].
* IdenticalStranger: Lord Edgware's butler, Alton, is said to bear a striking resemblance to Bryan Martin, but there is no mention of familial ties between the two characters. The TV adaptation exemplifies this by having the two played by brothers Christopher and Dominic Guard.

to:

* HeKnowsTooMuch: [[spoiler:Donald Ross and Carlotta Adams]] was Adams were]] murdered for knowing the fact that [[spoiler:the Lady Edgware that was in the party during the time of the murder was, in fact, an impersonator]].
* IdenticalStranger: Lord Edgware's butler, Alton, is said to bear a striking resemblance to Bryan Martin, but there is no mention of familial ties between the two characters. The TV adaptation exemplifies this by having the two played by brothers Christopher and Dominic Guard.



* SettingUpdate: The 1985 film moved the setting to the 80s.
%%* SummationGathering: In the David Suchet adaptation.


Added DiffLines:


!!The screen adaptations provide examples of the following:
* AdaptationalAttractiveness: Inverted with Bryan Martin and Alton. The books consistently describe the two as incredibly young and handsome, especially the latter, whom Hastings compared to a Greek God and considers as "one of the handsomest young men [he's] ever seen". Their TV counterparts, while not necessarily ugly, are not as conventionally attractive, and wouldn't attract such gushes from other people.
* AdaptationalDyeJob: Genevieve "Jenny" Driver is mostly recognisable, in the books, from her distinctive red heir. In the 2000 adaptation, she's dark-haired.
* AdaptationalHeroism: Downplayed. Jane Wilkinson is described as a blatantly selfish individual who shamelessly brags about wanting to kill her husband so that she can marry another man, and refuses to take the hint when Poirot tries to refuse her commission to "get rid" of her husband. In the 2000 adaptation, she is portrayed [[spoiler:(initially, anyway)]] as a sympathetic victim who is forced to silently endure her husband's cruelty, and her asking for Poirot's help comes across more like a desperate plea than a callous demand.
** In the 2000 adaptation, the Duke of Merton comes across as a pleasant person, and at the end of the story he [[spoiler:personally rewards Poirot for saving him from unwittingly marrying a murderess.]]
* DeathByAdaptation: In the novels, [[spoiler:Alton the butler]] quietly disappears when the police started digging around and almost discovered [[spoiler:his stealing of his master's money]]. In the 2000 TV adaptation, the police intercepts him just as he is leaving the country, and he dies in the ensuing chase.
* {{Foreshadowing}}: The David Suchet adaptation opens with a theater production in which Jane Wilkinson is playing [[spoiler:Lady Macbeth]].
* RealLifeRelative: The TV adaptation exemplifies the IdenticalStranger phenomenon between Bryan Martin and Alton by having the two played by brothers Christopher and Dominic Guard.
* SettingUpdate: The 1985 film moved the setting to the 80s.
%%* SummationGathering: In the David Suchet adaptation.
20th Oct '16 3:35:23 PM yisfidri
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* WorthyOpponant: In the final scene of the 1985 film, Poirot is this for [[spoiler:Jane Wilkinson; he responds in kind.]]

to:

* WorthyOpponant: WorthyOpponent: In the final scene of the 1985 film, Poirot is this for [[spoiler:Jane Wilkinson; he responds in kind.]]
20th Oct '16 3:35:12 PM yisfidri
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* WomanScorned: A male version: [[spoiler: Poirot initially speculates that, after Jane rejected Bryan Martin for the Duke of Merton, Bryan committed the murder for the purposes of framing Jane and getting her hanged.]]

to:

* WomanScorned: A male version: [[spoiler: Poirot initially speculates that, after Jane rejected Bryan Martin for the Duke of Merton, Bryan committed the murder for the purposes of framing Jane and getting her hanged.]]
* WorthyOpponant: In the final scene of the 1985 film, Poirot is this for [[spoiler:Jane Wilkinson; he responds in kind.
]]
1st Sep '16 7:18:26 PM justanid
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[[quoteright:200:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/poirot__lord_edgware_dies_1e.jpg]]
%%[[caption-width-right:200:some caption text]]

A novel by Creator/AgathaChristie published in 1933, featuring Literature/HerculePoirot.

When the fourth Baron Edgware is murdered, the primary suspect is his estranged wife, the talented actress Jane Wilkinson, who wanted to marry the Duke of Merton, and whom Lord Edgware's servants swear they saw entering his house. However, Jane spent the whole evening at a high-profile dinner party with twelve distinguished people, after having found out from Poirot that her husband had sent her a letter granting her a divorce -- a letter that she did not receive. If Jane did not kill her husband, who did?

----
!!This novel provides examples of the following:



%% ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out. Add context to the entries before uncommenting them.



%%
%% ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out. Add context to the entries before uncommenting them.
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A novel by Creator/AgathaChristie published in 1933, featuring Literature/HerculePoirot.

When the fourth Baron Edgware is murdered, the primary suspect is his estranged wife, the talented actress Jane Wilkinson, who wanted to marry the Duke of Merton, and whom Lord Edgware's servants swear they saw entering his house. However, Jane spent the whole evening at a high-profile dinner party with twelve distinguished people, after having found out from Poirot that her husband had sent her a letter granting her a divorce -- a letter that she did not receive. If Jane did not kill her husband, who did?

!!''Lord Edgware Dies'' contains examples of the following tropes:

to:

%%
%% ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out. Add context to the entries before uncommenting them.
%%
%%
%%
A novel by Creator/AgathaChristie published in 1933, featuring Literature/HerculePoirot.

When the fourth Baron Edgware is murdered, the primary suspect is his estranged wife, the talented actress Jane Wilkinson, who wanted to marry the Duke of Merton, and whom Lord Edgware's servants swear they saw entering his house. However, Jane spent the whole evening at a high-profile dinner party with twelve distinguished people, after having found out from Poirot that her husband had sent her a letter granting her a divorce -- a letter that she did not receive. If Jane did not kill her husband, who did?

!!''Lord Edgware Dies'' contains examples of the following tropes:
28th Jul '16 3:32:01 AM yisfidri
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* AdaptationalAttractiveness: Inverted with Bryan Marin and Alton. The books consistently describe the two as incredibly young and handsome, especially the latter, whom Hastings compared to a Greek God and considers as "one of the handsomest young men [he's] ever seen". Their TV counterparts, while not necessarily ugly, are not as conventionally attractive, and wouldn't attract such gushes from other people.

to:

* AdaptationalAttractiveness: Inverted with Bryan Marin Martin and Alton. The books consistently describe the two as incredibly young and handsome, especially the latter, whom Hastings compared to a Greek God and considers as "one of the handsomest young men [he's] ever seen". Their TV counterparts, while not necessarily ugly, are not as conventionally attractive, and wouldn't attract such gushes from other people.
22nd Jul '16 10:12:33 AM Adept
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* AdaptationalAttractiveness: Inverted with Bryan Marin and Alton. The books consistently describe the two as incredibly young and handsome, especially the latter, whom Hastings compared to a Greek God and considers "one of the handsomest young men [he's] ever seen". Their TV counterparts, while not necessarily ugly, are not as conventionally attractive, and wouldn't attract such gushes from other people.

to:

* AdaptationalAttractiveness: Inverted with Bryan Marin and Alton. The books consistently describe the two as incredibly young and handsome, especially the latter, whom Hastings compared to a Greek God and considers as "one of the handsomest young men [he's] ever seen". Their TV counterparts, while not necessarily ugly, are not as conventionally attractive, and wouldn't attract such gushes from other people.
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