History Literature / LittleWomen

30th Jun '16 3:45:56 AM K
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* UnclePennybags: Aunt March is not, and the narration snarkily points this out, when talking about how ''someone'' (not to hint Aunt March) should do something to help Beth's study of music. Old Mr. Laurence, on the other hand, sends over flowers and ice cream for the girls when he hears about how they gave away their Christmas breakfast to the Hummels and Beth saw him respond to a woman asking a fishmonger to let her work in exchange for fish by grabbing the nearest fish and buying it for her after she was denied.
29th Jun '16 3:45:28 PM Shoebox
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So Louisa May Alcott vicariously describes the story behind the publication of the book that made her a celebrity overnight with an instant success most authors never dare to dream of. Alcott never intended, however, for ''Little Women'' to be her ''magnum opus''; she only needed a little money. Isn't {{irony}} wonderful? The novel was published in two volumes in 1868-1869.[[note]]The "first book" described above is ''Moods'', an intensely (now nearly unreadable) moral melodrama for adults that Alcott considered her real masterpiece; it attracted some favourable reviews but never a wide audience, despite the author revising it several times even after initial publication.[[/note]]

to:

So Louisa May Alcott vicariously describes the story behind the publication of the book that made her a celebrity overnight with an instant success most authors never dare to dream of. Alcott never intended, however, for ''Little Women'' to be her ''magnum opus''; she only needed a little money. Isn't {{irony}} wonderful? The novel was published in two volumes in 1868-1869.[[note]]The "first book" described above is ''Moods'', an intensely (now nearly unreadable) unreadably) moral melodrama for adults that Alcott considered her real masterpiece; it attracted some favourable reviews but never a wide audience, despite the author revising it several times even after initial publication.[[/note]]
29th Jun '16 12:33:08 AM annette12
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* '''Amy''': The yellow-haired, graceful, vain but essentially good-hearted youngest child who grows from a SpoiledBrat into a NaiveEverygirl (though unfortunately, most readers still consider her a SpoiledBrat), and very pointedly [[TheGloriousWarOfSisterlyRivalry Jo's opposite]]. Her talent--which, she famously laments, isn't exactly genius-level--lies in the visual arts. Ironically, when the real-life May Alcott was later given the opportunity to illustrate her sister's books, the result was panned as woefully amateurish.

to:

* '''Amy''': The yellow-haired, graceful, vain but essentially good-hearted youngest child who grows from a SpoiledBrat into a NaiveEverygirl (though unfortunately, most readers still consider her a SpoiledBrat), NaiveEverygirl, and very pointedly [[TheGloriousWarOfSisterlyRivalry Jo's opposite]]. Her talent--which, she famously laments, isn't exactly genius-level--lies in the visual arts. Ironically, when the real-life May Alcott was later given the opportunity to illustrate her sister's books, the result was panned as woefully amateurish.



* AlphaBitch: Amy's classmate, April Snow, and, to a lesser degree, her artistic rival, May Chester. Many readers ''still'' consider Amy to be this even when she is all grown up.

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* AlphaBitch: Amy's classmate, April Snow, and, to a lesser degree, her artistic rival, May Chester. Many readers ''still'' consider Amy to be this even when she is all grown up.
10th May '16 5:32:27 PM puellapeanut
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* AdaptationalAttractiveness: Routine; save for Meg and the adult Amy, the book makes no attempt to hide the very ordinary looks of its protagonists, which obviously isn't going to work onscreen.

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* AdaptationalAttractiveness: Routine; save for Meg who is always described as being the prettiest of the March girls (and very pretty generally) and the adult Amy, Amy who grows to be "attractive and pleasing to the face" though not beautiful, the book makes no attempt to hide the very ordinary looks of some of its protagonists, protagonists (especially Jo and Professor Bhaer), which obviously isn't going to work onscreen.



** To a lesser extent, Meg, the novel does describe her as really pretty but also as "plump", which doesn't describe the figures of the actresses that portrayed her

to:

** To a lesser extent, Meg, the novel does describe her as really very pretty and the beauty of the family but also as "plump", "plump" (though considering the time-period of the book, this doesn't mean "fat" or "overweight" but rather shapely and womanly - which doesn't describe the figures of the actresses that portrayed herher.



* AlphaBitch: Amy's classmate, April Snow, and, to a lesser degree, her artistic rival, May Chester.

to:

* AlphaBitch: Amy's classmate, April Snow, and, to a lesser degree, her artistic rival, May Chester. Many readers ''still'' consider Amy to be this even when she is all grown up.



* NatureLover: Dan
10th May '16 5:24:35 PM puellapeanut
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So Louisa May Alcott vicariously describes the story behind the publication of the book that made her a celebrity overnight with an instant success most authors never dare to dream of. Alcott never intended, however, for ''Little Women'' to be her ''magnum opus''; she only needed a little money. Isn't {{irony}} wonderful? The novel was published in two volumes in 1868-1869.[[note]]The "first book" described above is ''Moods'', an intensely (now nearly unreadably) moral melodrama for adults that Alcott considered her real masterpiece; it attracted some favourable reviews but never a wide audience, despite the author revising it several times even after initial publication.[[/note]]

to:

So Louisa May Alcott vicariously describes the story behind the publication of the book that made her a celebrity overnight with an instant success most authors never dare to dream of. Alcott never intended, however, for ''Little Women'' to be her ''magnum opus''; she only needed a little money. Isn't {{irony}} wonderful? The novel was published in two volumes in 1868-1869.[[note]]The "first book" described above is ''Moods'', an intensely (now nearly unreadably) unreadable) moral melodrama for adults that Alcott considered her real masterpiece; it attracted some favourable reviews but never a wide audience, despite the author revising it several times even after initial publication.[[/note]]



* '''Meg''' (short for Margaret), the responsible first-born who tries to set a good example for her sisters, [[TheKirk make Jo behave more like a lady and Amy less like one]], and [[InWithTheInCrowd look less poor than she is in front of her rich friends]], the Moffat family. [[TeamMom Good-hearted and motherly]], but also constantly fights against vanity, self-indulgence and discontent, especially given she's the sister who can most clearly remember the family's prosperous past.
* '''Jo''' (a TomboyishName for Josephine): Alcott's AuthorAvatar and, by 19th-century standards, a tomboy--i.e., she likes to stand with her hands in her pockets, whistle, and exclaim "Christopher Columbus!". Jo generally tends to occupy the opposite end of the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism from her sisters, being bold, ambitious, blunt, terribly unladylike, and the unofficial protagonist. Like Alcott, she is a devoted writer.
* '''Beth''' (short for Elizabeth): Shy, quiet, selfless and kind, practically perfect in every way except for [[ShrinkingViolet her utter timidity around everyone and everything but her family]]. Jo's closest confidante along with Meg, as her real-life counterpart Lizzie was to Alcott (the one counterpart, in fact, whose name wasn't changed). Like the real Beth, she becomes ill with scarlet fever and remains [[IllGirl fragile and weak]] long after recovery.
* '''Amy''': The blonde, graceful, vain but good-hearted beauty who grows from a SpoiledBrat into a NaiveEverygirl, and very pointedly [[TheGloriousWarOfSisterlyRivalry Jo's opposite]]. Her talent--which, she famously laments, isn't exactly genius-level--lies in the visual arts. Ironically, when the real-life May Alcott was later given the opportunity to illustrate her sister's books, the result was panned as woefully amateurish.

to:

* '''Meg''' (short for Margaret), the brunette beauty of the family and the responsible first-born who tries to set a good example for her sisters, [[TheKirk make Jo behave more like a lady and Amy less like one]], and [[InWithTheInCrowd look less poor than she is in front of her rich friends]], the Moffat family. [[TeamMom Good-hearted and motherly]], but also constantly fights against vanity, self-indulgence and discontent, especially given she's the sister who can most clearly remember the family's prosperous past.
* '''Jo''' (a TomboyishName for Josephine): Alcott's AuthorAvatar and, by 19th-century standards, a tomboy--i.e., she likes to stand with her hands in her pockets, whistle, and exclaim "Christopher Columbus!". Jo generally tends to occupy the opposite end of the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism from her sisters, being plain faced, bold, ambitious, blunt, terribly unladylike, and the unofficial protagonist. Like Alcott, she is a devoted writer.
* '''Beth''' (short for Elizabeth): Shy, quiet, selfless tranquil and kind, gentle, practically perfect in every way except for [[ShrinkingViolet her utter timidity around everyone and everything but her family]]. Jo's closest confidante along with Meg, as her real-life counterpart Lizzie was to Alcott (the one counterpart, in fact, whose name wasn't changed). Like the real Beth, she becomes ill with scarlet fever and remains [[IllGirl fragile and weak]] long after recovery.
* '''Amy''': The blonde, yellow-haired, graceful, vain but essentially good-hearted beauty youngest child who grows from a SpoiledBrat into a NaiveEverygirl, NaiveEverygirl (though unfortunately, most readers still consider her a SpoiledBrat), and very pointedly [[TheGloriousWarOfSisterlyRivalry Jo's opposite]]. Her talent--which, she famously laments, isn't exactly genius-level--lies in the visual arts. Ironically, when the real-life May Alcott was later given the opportunity to illustrate her sister's books, the result was panned as woefully amateurish.


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Note: Little Men or Jo's Boys Tropes are '''NOT LISTED HERE'''. They can be found and added to [[Literature/LittleMen here]].
5th May '16 3:30:54 PM puellapeanut
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The next sequel, ''Little Men'', takes place at Plumfield, which Jo and Fritz have turned into an orphanage/school for young boys, based not-so-subtly on Bronson Alcott's then-controversial educational theories. We are introduced to Jo's sons, Rob and Teddy, Laurie and Amy's daughter [[DeadGuyJunior Bess]], the Brooke twins Daisy and Demijohn (a clever way of avoiding Margaret and John Jr.), their baby sister Josie and Professor Bhaer's orphaned nephews Franz and Emil. Also on hand are a mixed assortment of other [[AnAesop Aesop]]-appropriate youngsters, the foremost being ex-pickpocket and street violinist Nat, his best friend Dan, and [[TomboyAndGirlyGirl Daisy's tomboyish friend Annie, called "Nan"]].

Ten years later in ''Jo's Boys'', Plumfield has grown into a mixed college (a rare phenomenon at the time) and we rejoin these LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters as young adults, plagued by an epidemic of romance and broken hearts amidst chasing dreams and choosing careers.



!!''Little Women'' and its sequels provide examples of:

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!!''Little Women'' and its sequels provide examples of:
5th May '16 3:25:58 PM puellapeanut
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* SmokingIsCool: Dan talks Nat and Tommy into smoking cigars and playing cards late one night in the dormitory. Naturally, they nearly burn down the school and serious consequences follow.



* TeamDad: Franz to the younger kids during ''Little Men''.
* TeamMom: Meg to her sisters; later, Jo in ''Little Men''



* ThemeTwinNaming: Daisy and Demi, named after their parents Margaret (Meg) and John.
* ThoseTwoGuys: In ''Jo's Boys'', Stuffy and Dolly.
** And in ''Little Men'', Dick and Dolly



* TomboyAndGirlyGirl:
** Jo and Amy
** ''Little Men'': Nan and Daisy
** ''Jo's Boys'': Josie and Bess

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* TomboyAndGirlyGirl:
**
TomboyAndGirlyGirl: Jo and Amy
** ''Little Men'': Nan and Daisy
** ''Jo's Boys'': Josie and Bess
Amy



* UnusualEuphemism: In ''Little Men'', Dan tries to get Nat and Tommy to swear. Tommy's idea of a good round oath? "Thunder-turtles!"
** Jo's favorite exclamation of "Christopher Columbus!" also counts as this, since it's generally understood to be her version of swearing. In ''Little Men'' they actually name the dog Christopher Columbus so that she has an excuse to say it.

to:

* UnusualEuphemism: In ''Little Men'', Dan tries to get Nat and Tommy to swear. Tommy's idea of a good round oath? "Thunder-turtles!"
**
Jo's favorite exclamation of "Christopher Columbus!" also counts as this, since it's generally understood to be her version of swearing. In ''Little Men'' they actually name the dog Christopher Columbus so that she has an excuse to say it.



* VictoriousChildhoodFriend: Nat and Daisy, who have been good friends since ''Little Men'', get married in ''Jo's Boys''.
** ''LittleWomen'' itself [[PlayingWithATrope plays with the trope]], as Laurie ultimately marries a girl he's known since childhood (Amy) but ''not'' the one he's harbored romantic feelings for since then (Jo). So Laurie was both [[UnluckyChildhoodFriend unlucky]] ''and'' victorious.

to:

* VictoriousChildhoodFriend: Nat and Daisy, who have been good friends since ''Little Men'', get married in ''Jo's Boys''.
**
''LittleWomen'' itself [[PlayingWithATrope plays with the trope]], as Laurie ultimately marries a girl he's known since childhood (Amy) but ''not'' the one he's harbored romantic feelings for since then (Jo). So Laurie was both [[UnluckyChildhoodFriend unlucky]] ''and'' victorious.
5th May '16 3:15:18 PM puellapeanut
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* LethalChef: Jo in Chapter 11 of ''Little Women'', ''Experiments''. Averted in the next chapter, ''Camp Laurence'', which takes place the following month: when John Brooke asks who can make good coffee, Meg nominates Jo - who had spent the time between the two chapters taking cookery lessons. By ''Little Men'', she is giving Daisy simple cookery lessons.

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* LethalChef: Jo in Chapter 11 of ''Little Women'', ''Experiments''. Averted in the next chapter, ''Camp Laurence'', which takes place the following month: when John Brooke asks who can make good coffee, Meg nominates Jo - who had spent the time between the two chapters taking cookery lessons. By ''Little Men'', she is giving Daisy simple cookery lessons.



** Elizabeth March = Beth. [[spoiler: Elizabeth Laurence = Bess (initially Beth)]]
** John Brooke = John. [[spoiler: John Brooke II = Demi.]]
** [[Fanon Josephine March I]] = Aunt March. Josephine March = Jo. [[spoiler: Josephine Brooke = Josie.]]
** Margaret Curtis March = Marmee. Margaret March = Meg. [[spoiler: Margaret Brooke = Daisy.]]
** Robert March = ? (We only know him as Father/Papa/Mr. March). [[spoiler: Robert Bhaer = Rob.]]
** Theodore Laurence = Laurie (Jo calls him Teddy). [[spoiler: Theodore Bhaer = Teddy]]

to:

** Elizabeth March = Beth. [[spoiler: Elizabeth Laurence = Bess (initially Beth)]]
Beth.
** John Brooke = John. [[spoiler: John Brooke II = Demi.]]\n
** [[Fanon Josephine March I]] = Aunt March. Josephine March = Jo. [[spoiler: Josephine Brooke = Josie.]]
Jo.
** Margaret Curtis March = Marmee. Margaret March = Meg. [[spoiler: Margaret Brooke = Daisy.]]
Meg.
** Robert March = ? (We only know him as Father/Papa/Mr. March). [[spoiler: Robert Bhaer = Rob.]]
March).
** Theodore Laurence = Laurie (Jo calls him Teddy). [[spoiler: Theodore Bhaer = Teddy]]



* [[OverprotectiveDad Overprotective Mom]]: In ''Jo's Boys'', Meg is the overprotective mother who doesn't believe Nat is good enough for her daughter Daisy. She relents later, though.
* ParentalMarriageVeto: Meg towards Nat the ex-street musician and her precious Daisy for most of ''Jo's Boys''. In ''Little Women'', Aunt March tries to impose one on Meg by virtue of her wealth, and fails.
* PennyAmongDiamonds: In ''Jo's Boys'', Nat goes to Europe to continue his musical education. Due to his having wealthy and influential friends, everyone thinks that ''he's'' wealthy and influential as well... too bad he's actually an orphan who spent a number of years as a street musician, and thus has little idea of how to handle either the money or the attention. Cue the nineteenth century version of a CreditCardPlot.
* PetTheDog: Dan's soft side for baby Teddy and animals.

to:

* [[OverprotectiveDad Overprotective Mom]]: In ''Jo's Boys'', Meg is the overprotective mother who doesn't believe Nat is good enough for her daughter Daisy. She relents later, though.
* ParentalMarriageVeto: Meg towards Nat the ex-street musician and her precious Daisy for most of ''Jo's Boys''. In ''Little Women'', Aunt March tries to impose one on Meg by virtue of her wealth, and fails.
* PennyAmongDiamonds: In ''Jo's Boys'', Nat goes to Europe to continue his musical education. Due to his having wealthy and influential friends, everyone thinks that ''he's'' wealthy and influential as well... too bad he's actually an orphan who spent a number of years as a street musician, and thus has little idea of how to handle either the money or the attention. Cue the nineteenth century version of a CreditCardPlot.
* PetTheDog: Dan's soft side for baby Teddy and animals.
fails.



* ProtagonistCenteredMorality: Because Demi is clearly Alcott's favorite character, and because he adorably mispronounces words, it's considered cute and charming in ''Little Men'' when he bullies his sister and cousin into burning all their favorite toys in a "sackerryfice" to an imagined god, the "Naughty Kitty-mouse". (He freely admits that this was a compromise choice, because he had no "live creatures to sackerryfice".)



* SatelliteLoveInterest: Dora in ''Jo's Boys'', whom Tommy originally started dating foolishly [[OperationJealousy trying to make Nan jealous]], only to find he actually enjoyed the way she treated him and "accidentally" proposed to her.
* SchoolPlay: A couple in ''Little Men'', Several (mostly written by Jo and Laurie) in the chapter "Class Day" in ''Jo's Boys''.
5th May '16 3:01:20 PM puellapeanut
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* EducationMama: In ''Little Men'', one of the titular Little Men (Billy) has an already old education papa who drove his promising student son to mental handicapping and physical frailty and then dropped him off at boarding school in shame.



* {{Expy}}: Meg's youngest daughter, Josie.



* FishOutOfWater: Nat, when he first comes to Plumfield.
* FlatCharacter: There are an awful lot of characters who have [[PhilosophicalParable virtues and vices]] in place of actual personalities, especially in ''Little Men''.



* HappilyMarried: Parents Margaret and Robert, Amy and Laurie, Meg and John [[spoiler: until he dies]], Jo and Fritz.

to:

* HappilyMarried: Parents Margaret and Robert, Amy and Laurie, Meg and John [[spoiler: until he dies]], John, Jo and Fritz.



** There's a lot of referring to Jo's Boys as "gay."



* HopelessSuitor: Laurie for Jo; Tom for Nan.

to:

* HopelessSuitor: Laurie for Jo; Tom for Nan.Jo.



* KillEmAll: Barely averted at the end of ''Jo's Boys''.
-->It is a strong temptation to the weary historian to close the present tale with an earthquake which should engulf Plumfield and its environs so deeply in the bowels of the earth that no youthful Schliemann could ever find a vestige of it.
5th May '16 2:47:59 PM puellapeanut
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* AccidentalProposal: Tom finds himself accidentally engaged to Dora in ''Jo's Boys'', although he doesn't really mind afterward.
* ActuallyPrettyFunny: In the FandomNod chapter of ''Jo's Boys'', ''Jo's Last Scrape'', Ted Bhaer's response to the reporter who showed up at Plumfield's door uninvited:
-->'If you could tell me Mrs Bhaer's age and birthplace, date of marriage, and number of children, I should be much obliged,' continued the unabashed visitor as he tripped over the door-mat.\\
'She is about sixty, born in Nova Zembla, married just forty years ago today, and has eleven daughters. Anything else, sir?'\\
And Ted's sober face was such a funny contrast to his ridiculous reply that the reporter owned himself routed, and retired laughing.



* AmbiguouslyBrown: In ''Little Men'', Dan is described with black eyes, black hair, and, at several points where his skin is mentioned, brown skin. It's unclear as to whether this is racial, tanned, or just dirty, but Jo theorizes in ''Jo's Boys'' that Dan has Indian blood in him. Everyone else in the book seems to be Caucasian (several are specifically blond Germans) except for a Black cook[[note]]and, given some hints in the narrative, possibly another Black character in the background[[/note]], but Dan just seems like the odd boy out.



* BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor
** The old "a week of all play and no work" experiment takes up a chapter of ''Little Women''.
** Also the chapter ''Jo's Last Scrape'', in the final sequel. Jo, after twenty years, has finally seen her dream of becoming a famous author come true... only to have to deal with hordes of demanding, pushy fans and reporters.

to:

* BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor
**
BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor: The old "a week of all play and no work" experiment takes up a chapter of ''Little Women''.
** Also the chapter ''Jo's Last Scrape'', in the final sequel. Jo, after twenty years, has finally seen her dream of becoming a famous author come true... only to have to deal with hordes of demanding, pushy fans and reporters.
Women''.



* BettyAndVeronica
** Dora and Nan, for Tom.
** In the 1987 anime series, Laurie and Anthony (an anime-only character) are this to Jo... who doesn't really fancy either one of them.
* {{Bookworm}}: Jo, naturally. Also Demi in ''Little Men''.

to:

* BettyAndVeronica
** Dora and Nan, for Tom.
**
BettyAndVeronica: In the 1987 anime series, Laurie and Anthony (an anime-only character) are this to Jo... who doesn't really fancy either one of them.
* {{Bookworm}}: Jo, naturally. Also Demi in ''Little Men''.



* BrickJoke: Jo's dinner party in Little Women becomes this for herself, Meg, and Laurie in Little Men when she shopped for Daisy's toy kitchen and gives her cookery lessons.



** Nat is caught telling a lie, and this is treated as a very serious issue. The problem is, a much older boy was threatening to beat him if he'd ran through the boy's veggie patch - which he'd done because he was being chased by another older boy - so Nat got scared and denied it. And [[KarmaHoudini neither of the other boys were punished or even given a talking-to]], leaving us with the message that lying to get out of a dangerous situation is not only wrong, but so much worse than threatening and bullying little kids who aren't able to defend themselves.
*** This was the Victorian Era. Lying ''was'' worse than anything but murder, esp if you were a child.



* ChildhoodMarriagePromise: Nan and Tommy in ''Little Men''. Tommy is still trying to hold her to it ten years later in ''Jo's Boys'', but she will have nothing of it.
* CleaningUpRomanticLooseEnds: The last paragraph of ''Jo's Boys''.



* CoolAndUnusualPunishment: in ''Little Men,'' Professor Bhaer punishes Nat for lying by ordering Nat to cane his, Professor Bhaer's hand. Nat is more upset than if he himself had been caned.
* CoolOldLady: Marmee

to:

* CoolAndUnusualPunishment: in ''Little Men,'' Professor Bhaer punishes Nat for lying by ordering Nat to cane his, Professor Bhaer's hand. Nat is more upset than if he himself had been caned.
* CoolOldLady: MarmeeMarmee.



* CreepyDoll: In ''Little Men,'' Teddy throws a kid doll on a fire; since it's made of leather, he and the other children are horrified that it squirms as if it's in agony instead of burning immediately.
* DeadGuyJunior: Bess, of course, is short for Elizabeth. In the second half of ''Little Women'', she is even identified as "little Beth" and doesn't become Bess until ''Little Men''.



* DidNotGetTheGirl: Laurie in ''Little Women'', Dan in ''Jo's Boys.'' In the latter book, another major subplot features Tommy Bangs pointedly not getting the girl he originally wanted.

to:

* DidNotGetTheGirl: Laurie in ''Little Women'', Dan in ''Jo's Boys.'' In Women'' much to the latter book, another major subplot features Tommy Bangs pointedly not getting ETERNAL HORROR of the girl he originally wanted.shippers.
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