History Literature / LesMiserables

19th Jun '17 6:27:41 PM PaulA
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* AffluentAscetic: Bishop Myriel's position comes with a large salary and a palatial official residence. He allows the local hospital to occupy the palace while he lives in a small adjoining building, and donates nearly all his salary to charity. The only touch of luxury he permits himself is his silverware, which he values for its sentimental associations more than its monetary value.
8th May '17 10:19:36 AM invoke442
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* AuthorFilibuster: Almost half of the book is Hugo exposing directly his thoughts about the ills of society, history (mostly the first half of the 19th century), the struggle for democracy, and many other subjects. Sometimes, there are no mentions of the main characters of the novel for a hundred pages. It is fortunate for the reader that Victor Hugo's thoughts ''are'' extremely interesting, well-written, and ahead of their time. "The Intestine of the Leviathan" = "HEY KIDS, ISN'T THE SEWER SYSTEM OF PARIS INTERESTING?" To which the answer is, of course, "Yes. Yes it is." Even more obvious towards the end of the book, when he spends multiple chapters justifying the use of "argot", ie popular or vulgar speech. Hugo's previous works had been criticized precisely for relying on this type of language, which was deemed too vulgar for "real" literature.

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* AuthorFilibuster: Almost half of the book is Hugo exposing directly his thoughts about the ills of society, history (mostly the first half of the 19th century), the struggle for democracy, and many other subjects. Sometimes, there are no mentions of the main characters of the novel for a hundred pages. It is fortunate for the reader that Victor Hugo's thoughts ''are'' extremely interesting, well-written, and ahead of their time. "The Intestine of the Leviathan" = "HEY KIDS, ISN'T THE SEWER SYSTEM OF PARIS INTERESTING?" To which the answer is, of course, "Yes. Yes it is." Even more obvious towards the end of the book, when he spends multiple chapters justifying the use of "argot", ie "argot" (i.e., popular or vulgar speech.speech). Hugo's previous works had been criticized precisely for relying on this type of language, which was deemed too vulgar for "real" literature.
21st Apr '17 11:00:41 PM Fiwen9430
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** The man trapped by the fallen cart, Fauchelevent, later saves Valjean (and Cosette) when he allows them into the convent, in repayment.
1st Apr '17 6:35:25 AM PaulA
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* OneSteveLimit: Averted. There are no less that ''six''characters named Jean, or some variation thereof.
** Particularly notable with the [[FamilyThemeNaming Valjean family]], which consists of [[RepetitiveName Jean and Jeanne Valjean]], and their children, Jean and Jeanne Valjean.

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* OneSteveLimit: Averted. There are no less that ''six''characters than ''six'' characters named Jean, or some variation thereof.
** Particularly notable with
thereof -- four of them in the [[FamilyThemeNaming Valjean family]], which consists of [[RepetitiveName Jean and Jeanne Valjean]], and their children, Jean and Jeanne Valjean.
31st Mar '17 7:25:27 AM CupcakeOtaku87
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* OneSteveLimit: Averted. There are no less that ''six''characters named Jean, or some variation thereof. Particularly notable with the [FamilyThemeNaming Valjean family]], which consists of [RepetitiveName Jean and Jeanne Valjean]], and their children, Jean and Jeanne Valjean.

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* OneSteveLimit: Averted. There are no less that ''six''characters named Jean, or some variation thereof. Particularly
**Particularly
notable with the [FamilyThemeNaming [[FamilyThemeNaming Valjean family]], which consists of [RepetitiveName [[RepetitiveName Jean and Jeanne Valjean]], and their children, Jean and Jeanne Valjean.
31st Mar '17 7:22:42 AM CupcakeOtaku87
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Added DiffLines:

*OneSteveLimit: Averted. There are no less that ''six''characters named Jean, or some variation thereof. Particularly notable with the [FamilyThemeNaming Valjean family]], which consists of [RepetitiveName Jean and Jeanne Valjean]], and their children, Jean and Jeanne Valjean.
22nd Mar '17 9:56:13 AM Darkknightskye
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* Subverted with Eponine. She's described to be homely, and although she's not as kind and caring as Cosette is or as passionate as Enjolras, she's not a conniving, manipulative JerkAss like her parents either.

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* ** Subverted with Eponine. She's described to be homely, and although she's not as kind and caring as Cosette is or as passionate as Enjolras, she's not a conniving, manipulative JerkAss like her parents either.
22nd Mar '17 9:55:51 AM Darkknightskye
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Added DiffLines:

* Subverted with Eponine. She's described to be homely, and although she's not as kind and caring as Cosette is or as passionate as Enjolras, she's not a conniving, manipulative JerkAss like her parents either.
1st Mar '17 5:32:18 PM PaulA
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** The fact that Grantaire signs his paintings as "R" can be confusing for English readers, but in French the capital is called "grand R", phonetically pronounced "Grahnd Air".

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** The fact that Grantaire signs his paintings as "R" can be confusing for English readers, but in French the capital R is called "grand R", phonetically pronounced "Grahnd Air".
1st Mar '17 5:30:47 PM PaulA
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* IfICantHaveYou: Éponine to Marius. She gives him a false message that his friends are expecting him at the barricade. Distraught due to the belief that Cosette had left for England, he goes there. Éponine goes back there herself, hoping that they will both die there together.

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* IfICantHaveYou: Éponine to Marius. She When Marius thinks Cosette is gone forever and is emotionally vulnerable, Éponine gives him a false message that his friends are expecting him at the barricade. Distraught due to the belief that Cosette had left for England, he goes there. Éponine goes back there herself, hoping that they will both die there together. Although she does belatedly redeem herself somewhat by throwing herself in front of a gun aimed at him, and admitting her dishonesty, Hugo makes it clear that part of her act was just that she did want him to die, she just didn't want to ''see'' it so she chose to go first. And as she's dying in his arms she does say "We're all going to die, and I'm so happy".



** Éponine helps Marius to find Cosette, despite the fact that she's also in love with him.
*** But then when Marius thinks Cosette is gone forever and is emotionally vulnerable, Éponine anonymously informs him that his friends have joined the uprising knowing that he'll throw himself onto the barricades, and she goes along too because she would rather they die together than anybody else have him. Although she does belatedly redeem herself somewhat by throwing herself in front of a gun aimed at him, and admitting her dishonesty, Hugo makes it clear that part of her act was just that she did want him to die, she just didn't want to ''see'' it so she chose to go first. And as she's dying in his arms she does say "We're all going to die, and I'm so happy". See IfICantHaveYou above. The musical softened and simplified the character of Éponine considerably, and many fans have absolutely no idea of the moral complexity and culpability of the character as portrayed in the novel.

to:

** Éponine helps Marius to find Cosette, despite the fact that she's also in love with him.
*** But then when Marius thinks Cosette is gone forever and is emotionally vulnerable, Éponine anonymously informs him that his friends have joined the uprising knowing that he'll throw himself onto the barricades, and she goes along too because she would rather they die together than anybody else have
him. Although she does belatedly redeem herself somewhat by throwing herself in front of a gun aimed at him, She doesn't manage to keep it up, though, and admitting her dishonesty, Hugo makes it clear that part of her act was just that she did want him to die, she just didn't want to ''see'' it so she chose to go first. And as she's dying in his arms she does say "We're all going to die, and I'm so happy". See slides into IfICantHaveYou above. The musical softened and simplified the character of Éponine considerably, and many fans have absolutely no idea of the moral complexity and culpability of the character as portrayed in the novel.later.



*** The Swedish translation is ''Samhällets Olycksbarn'' that translates to roughly "The Society's unfortunate children"



** The fact that Grantaire signs his paintings as "R" can be confusing for English readers, but his name in French actually means "Capital R."
*** To clarify, in French the capital R is phonetically pronounced "Grahnd Air" Therefore, Grantair and the capital R sound almost exactly alike.

to:

** The fact that Grantaire signs his paintings as "R" can be confusing for English readers, but his name in French actually means "Capital R."
*** To clarify,
in French the capital R is called "grand R", phonetically pronounced "Grahnd Air" Therefore, Grantair and the capital R sound almost exactly alike.Air".
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.LesMiserables