History Literature / LesMiserables

17th May '16 10:59:26 PM Sharkemental
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''Les Misérables'' (1862) is a sprawling epic by Creator/VictorHugo, the seeds of which can be found in some of his earlier, shorter works, such as his novel(la) ''[[Literature/TheLastDayOfACondemnedMan Le dernier jour d'un condamné]]'', which also treats upon the subject of the penal system in France and includes a character that resembles what could later be called an AU-style Valjean. It was made into a very well-known [[Theatre/LesMiserables musical play]] that has run for nearly thirty years.

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''Les Misérables'' (1862) is a sprawling epic by Creator/VictorHugo, the seeds of which can be found in some of his earlier, shorter works, such as his novel(la) ''[[Literature/TheLastDayOfACondemnedMan Le dernier jour Dernier Jour d'un condamné]]'', Condamné]]'', which also treats upon the subject of the penal system in France and includes a character that resembles what could later be called an AU-style Valjean. It was made into a very well-known [[Theatre/LesMiserables musical play]] that has run for nearly thirty years.
17th Apr '16 12:34:27 AM Synchronicity
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Added DiffLines:

* BeautyEqualsGoodness: Cosette is unambiguously beautiful to complement her genuinely kind and caring personality. Enjolras is described as having an "angelic beauty" that reflects his love for France and his genuine desire for social change. In contrast, the Thénardiers are unattractive besides being cowardly, abusive, selfish con people.
30th Mar '16 10:29:22 AM TheUnknownUploader
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** A literal example with the two pistols Javert gives Marius.



* CorruptBureaucrat: When Valjean is recaptured and brought to trial, the prosecutor falsely states that he was part of a gang of robbers from the south. This is a factor in Valjean recieving a death sentence (which is commuted to life).

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* CorruptBureaucrat: When Valjean is recaptured and brought to trial, the prosecutor falsely states that he was part of a gang of robbers from the south. This is a factor in Valjean recieving receiving a death sentence (which is commuted to life).


Added DiffLines:

* VillainBall: An entire chapter is dedicated to describing how Javert holding it allowed Valjean and Cosette to escape his clutches.
14th Feb '16 7:34:33 PM PaulA
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* YouShallNotPass: Éponine towards the Patron-Mignette when they try to rob Jean ValJean's house.

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* YouShallNotPass: Éponine towards the Patron-Mignette when they try to rob Jean ValJean's Valjean's house.
14th Feb '16 7:29:54 PM PaulA
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''Les Misérables'' (1862) is a sprawling epic by Creator/VictorHugo, the seeds of which can be found in some of his earlier, shorter works, such as his novel(la) ''[[Literature/TheLastDayOfACondemnedMan Le dernier jour d'un condamné]]'', which also treats upon the subject of the penal system in France and includes a character that resembles what could later be called an AU-style Valjean. It was made into a very well-known [[Theatre/LesMiserables musical play]] that has run for nearly thirty years.

to:

''Les Misérables'' (1862) is a sprawling epic by Creator/VictorHugo, the seeds of which can be found in some of his earlier, shorter works, such as his novel(la) ''[[Literature/TheLastDayOfACondemnedMan Le dernier jour d'un condamné]]'', which also treats upon the subject of the penal system in France and includes a character that resembles what could later be called an AU-style Valjean. It was made into a very well-known [[Theatre/LesMiserables musical play]] that has run for nearly thirty years.



* AccidentalHero: Thénardier. First, when he accidentally saves Georges Pontmercy's life, and then again, in his attempt to blackmail Marius.

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* AccidentalHero: Thénardier. First, when he accidentally saves Georges Pontmercy's life, and then again, in his attempt to blackmail Marius.



-->The peasants of Asturias are convinced that in every litter of wolves there is one dog, which is killed by the mother because, otherwise, as he grew up, he would devour the other little ones.
-->Give to this dog-son of a wolf a human face, and the result will be Javert.

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-->The peasants of Asturias are convinced that in every litter of wolves there is one dog, which is killed by the mother because, otherwise, as he grew up, he would devour the other little ones. \n-->Give \\
Give
to this dog-son of a wolf a human face, and the result will be Javert.



--> ''All sorts of interrogation points flashed before his eyes. He put questions to himself, and made replies to himself, and his replies frightened him. He asked himself: "What has that convict done, that desperate fellow, whom I have pursued even to persecution, and who has had me under his foot, and who could have avenged himself, and who owed it both to his rancor and to his safety, in leaving me my life, in showing mercy upon me? His duty? No. [[ThePowerOfLove Something more]]. And I in showing mercy upon him in my turn--what have I done? My duty? No. [[IOweYouMyLife Something more]]. [[ToBeLawfulOrGood So there is something beyond duty?]]" Here he took fright;''

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--> ''All ** Javert's struggle with himself toward the end of the book:
--->All
sorts of interrogation points flashed before his eyes. He put questions to himself, and made replies to himself, and his replies frightened him. He asked himself: "What has that convict done, that desperate fellow, whom I have pursued even to persecution, and who has had me under his foot, and who could have avenged himself, and who owed it both to his rancor and to his safety, in leaving me my life, in showing mercy upon me? His duty? No. [[ThePowerOfLove Something more]].more. And I in showing mercy upon him in my turn--what have I done? My duty? No. [[IOweYouMyLife Something more]]. [[ToBeLawfulOrGood more. So there is something beyond duty?]]" duty?" Here he took fright;''fright;



* TheArtfulDodger: Gavroche. Hugo even mentions that once kids like Gavroche grow up, the world beats them down, but he assures us that as long as he's young, Gavroche is thriving.

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* TheArtfulDodger: TheArtfulDodger:
**
Gavroche. Hugo even mentions that once kids like Gavroche grow up, the world beats them down, but he assures us that as long as he's young, Gavroche is thriving.



* AuthorFilibuster: Almost half of the book is Hugo exposing directly his thoughts about the ills of society, history (mostly the first half of the 19th century), the struggle for democracy, and many other subjects. Sometimes, there are no mentions of the main characters of the novel for a hundred pages. It is fortunate for the reader that Victor Hugo's thoughts ''are'' extremely interesting, well-written, and ahead of their time. "The Intestine of the Leviathan" = "HEY KIDS, ISN'T THE SEWER SYSTEM OF PARIS INTERESTING?" To which the answer is, of course, "Yes. Yes it is." It's far beyond WriterOnBoard.
** Even more obvious towards the end of the book, when he spends multiple chapters justifying the use of "argot", ie popular or vulgar speech. Hugo's previous works had been criticized precisely for relying on this type of language, which was deemed too vulgar for "real" literature.

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* AuthorFilibuster: Almost half of the book is Hugo exposing directly his thoughts about the ills of society, history (mostly the first half of the 19th century), the struggle for democracy, and many other subjects. Sometimes, there are no mentions of the main characters of the novel for a hundred pages. It is fortunate for the reader that Victor Hugo's thoughts ''are'' extremely interesting, well-written, and ahead of their time. "The Intestine of the Leviathan" = "HEY KIDS, ISN'T THE SEWER SYSTEM OF PARIS INTERESTING?" To which the answer is, of course, "Yes. Yes it is." It's far beyond WriterOnBoard.
**
Even more obvious towards the end of the book, when he spends multiple chapters justifying the use of "argot", ie popular or vulgar speech. Hugo's previous works had been criticized precisely for relying on this type of language, which was deemed too vulgar for "real" literature.



** Valjean not shooting anyone at the barricade, but always tending to the wounded reflects Hugo's behaviour in the riots against Napoléon III.
* AuthorTract: This is Victor Hugo, who probably never wrote a single book which doesn't fit this. All Hugo's opinions on social justice, the French justice system, death penalty, politics, and many more are found in Les Misérables.

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** Valjean not shooting anyone at the barricade, but always tending to the wounded reflects Hugo's behaviour in the riots against Napoléon III.
* AuthorTract: This is Victor Hugo, who probably never wrote a single book which doesn't fit this. All Hugo's opinions on social justice, the French justice system, death penalty, politics, and many more are found in Les Misérables.



* BadassBoast: Javert when arresting the Thénardier gang: "Shoot! Your gun will misfire!" [[spoiler:It does.]]
** Eponine delivers a truly epic one when she decides to defend Cosette, Marius and Jean Valjean from the Patron-Mignette. Consider that she stands up against ''six hardass brutes'', including her own father.
---> '''Eponine''': [[YouShallNotPass You are not getting inside]]. I am not a pup, I am a wolf cub. You are six. What do I care about that? You cannot scare me. You will not go inside this house, because I do not wish it. If you get closer, I will bark. I said there was a dog there. That dog is me. So get away all of you. If you use the knife, I will use my legs. By God I am not afraid of you. In the summer, I starve, in the winter I freeze, and such stupid men believe they can scare me? Scare! What? That´s too funny. Its because you have some petty women who hide under their beds when you roar. I am not afraid. Not even for you (''towards her father'').

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* BadassBoast: BadassBoast:
**
Javert when arresting the Thénardier gang: "Shoot! Your gun will misfire!" [[spoiler:It does.]]
** Eponine Éponine delivers a truly epic one when she decides to defend Cosette, Marius and Jean Valjean from the Patron-Mignette. Consider that she stands up against ''six hardass brutes'', including her own father.
---> '''Eponine''': [[YouShallNotPass
father.
--->'''Éponine''':
You are not getting inside]].inside. I am not a pup, I am a wolf cub. You are six. What do I care about that? You cannot scare me. You will not go inside this house, because I do not wish it. If you get closer, I will bark. I said there was a dog there. That dog is me. So get away all of you. If you use the knife, I will use my legs. By God I am not afraid of you. In the summer, I starve, in the winter I freeze, and such stupid men believe they can scare me? Scare! What? That´s That's too funny. Its It's because you have some petty women who hide under their beds when you roar. I am not afraid. Not even for you (''towards her father'').



* BarefootPoverty: Several illustrations, including the most famous one centering on Cosette (see above). Justified, considering that a lot of it (aptly titled "The Miserable Ones") focuses on 19th century France, which wasn't doing all that hot.
** Little Cosette's bare feet are specifically mentioned many times in the descriptions of her time with the Thénardiers.
* BadassPreacher: Bishop Bienvenu Myriel. He dared to pass a mountain packed with robbers, and the robbers dared not assail him. And he went alone, to spare the life of the gendarmes. At the age of 70! Later on, he of course saves Valjean`s soul, going up against his entire society and gets away with it - to the benefit of Jean Valjean, Cosette, Marius, and several others.

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* BarefootPoverty: Several illustrations, including the most famous one centering on Cosette (see above). Justified, considering that a lot of it (aptly titled "The Miserable Ones") focuses on 19th century France, which wasn't doing all that hot.
BarefootPoverty:
** Little Cosette's bare feet are specifically mentioned many times in the descriptions of her time with the Thénardiers.
** Several illustrations, including the most famous one centering on Cosette (see above). Justified, considering that a lot of it (aptly titled "The Miserable Ones") focuses on 19th century France, which wasn't doing all that hot.
* BadassPreacher: Bishop Bienvenu Myriel. He dared to pass a mountain packed with robbers, and the robbers dared not assail him. And he went alone, to spare the life of the gendarmes. At the age of 70! Later on, he of course saves Valjean`s Valjean's soul, going up against his entire society and gets away with it - to the benefit of Jean Valjean, Cosette, Marius, and several others. others.



** Georges Pontmercy and his son Marius to Thénardier.
* BigDamnHeroes: Javert of all people pulls one of these during his arrest of the Thénardiers.

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** Georges Pontmercy and his son Marius to Thénardier.
* BigDamnHeroes: Javert of all people pulls one of these during his arrest of the Thénardiers.



* BigScrewedUpFamily: The Thénardiers. The giant Mme Thénardier behaves like a dog to M Thénardier; they idolise their daughters, mistreat their foster child, abandon their oldest son in the streets, and give away their two younger sons for money to a woman who has lost hers.
* BittersweetEnding: [[spoiler:Almost every character dies]], but Cosette and Marius live HappilyEverAfter and [[spoiler:Valjean's death]] comes peacefully, with Cosette by his side.
** The June Rebellion failed, but the revolutionaries didn't die in vain: [[UsefulNotes/RevolutionsOf1848 Louis Philippe was overthrown in 1848]], [[UsefulNotes/FrancoPrussianWar Napoleon III in 1870]], and the French Third Republic was established that same year. In other words, the world they died for ''did'' come true eventually.

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* BigScrewedUpFamily: The Thénardiers. The giant Mme Thénardier behaves like a dog to M Thénardier; they idolise their daughters, mistreat their foster child, abandon their oldest son in the streets, and give away their two younger sons for money to a woman who has lost hers.
* BittersweetEnding: [[spoiler:Almost every character dies]], but Cosette and Marius live HappilyEverAfter and [[spoiler:Valjean's death]] comes peacefully, with Cosette by his side.
**
side. The June Rebellion failed, but the revolutionaries didn't die in vain: [[UsefulNotes/RevolutionsOf1848 Louis Philippe was overthrown in 1848]], [[UsefulNotes/FrancoPrussianWar Napoleon III in 1870]], and the French Third Republic was established that same year. In other words, the world they died for ''did'' come true eventually.



* BlondeBrunetteRedhead: Contrary to the beliefs of many due to more recent portrayals of the characters in the musical post 2010 and the 2012 movie, Fantine has blonde hair, Cosette has brown, and Éponine's hair is described as auburn.

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* BlondeBrunetteRedhead: Contrary to the beliefs of many due to more recent portrayals of the characters in the musical post 2010 and the 2012 movie, Fantine has blonde hair, Cosette has brown, and Éponine's hair is described as auburn.



* BrawnHilda: Madam Thénardier, to the point where she brags of her own strength - she is able to break a walnut with a punch.

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* BrawnHilda: Madam Thénardier, to the point where she brags of her own strength - she is able to break a walnut with a punch.



* BrokenBird: Fantine.

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* BrokenBird: BrokenBird:
**
Fantine.



* CelibateHero: Enjolras, who channels all his energy into politics. He even calls "Patria" -- the abstract concept of France as motherland -- his mistress, to drive the point home.

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* CelibateHero: CelibateHero:
**
Enjolras, who channels all his energy into politics. He even calls "Patria" -- the abstract concept of France as motherland -- his mistress, to drive the point home.



* ChekhovsGun: Éponine's note "The cops are here." She originally wrote it in front of Marius to show him her literacy. He would later use the note to save Valjean's life.

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* ChekhovsGun: ChekhovsGun:
**
Éponine's note "The cops are here." She originally wrote it in front of Marius to show him her literacy. He would later use the note to save Valjean's life.



** The Jondrettes are the Thénardiers.
** The "young (working) man" who wears a grey blouse and cotton-velvet pantaloons is Éponine dressed as a boy. Her true identity is revealed after her TakingTheBullet for Marius at the barricades.[[note]]Hugo does hint once that "he" sounded like Éponine, but doesn't confirm it yet.[[/note]]

to:

** The Jondrettes are the Thénardiers.
** The "young (working) man" who wears a grey blouse and cotton-velvet pantaloons is Éponine dressed as a boy. Her true identity is revealed after her TakingTheBullet for Marius at the barricades.[[note]]Hugo does hint once that "he" sounded like Éponine, but doesn't confirm it yet.[[/note]]



** At the end of Part three, Marius has managed to save Valjean from Thénardier, but gotten Thénardier arrested (Marius' father owes his life to Thénardier -- or at least he thought so) and is no nearer finding Cosette.

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** At the end of Part three, Marius has managed to save Valjean from Thénardier, but gotten Thénardier arrested (Marius' father owes his life to Thénardier -- or at least he thought so) and is no nearer finding Cosette.



* ClingyJealousGirl: Éponine.

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* ClingyJealousGirl: Éponine.



** A man in uniform (Javert) is tailing another man (Thénardier) with (according to the narrator) the plan to put the latter also into a uniform. But with a different colour...

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** A man in uniform (Javert) is tailing another man (Thénardier) with (according to the narrator) the plan to put the latter also into a uniform. But with a different colour...



* ConMan: Thénardier starts out as this and just gets worse from there.

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* ConMan: Thénardier starts out as this and just gets worse from there.



* ConvenientlyCellmates: When Thénardier and the Patron-Minette gang get arrested, only Thénardier is put into a different cell from the others, who of course quickly devise a plan together and even manage to communicate the plan to Thénardier.

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* ConvenientlyCellmates: When Thénardier and the Patron-Minette gang get arrested, only Thénardier is put into a different cell from the others, who of course quickly devise a plan together and even manage to communicate the plan to Thénardier.



** Felix Tholomyes.

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** Felix Tholomyes.Tholomyès.



* DeadpanSnarker: Javert, in the scene where he arrests the Thénardiers, and to Les Amis, as he's led away by Valjean and believes he's about to be executed.
--> Javert: "See you all immediately!"
--> Javert: "Would you like my hat?"
** Also Gavroche, most hilariously in this exchange with a sergeant of the National Guard:
-->'''Sergeant:''' "Will you tell me where you are going, you wretch?"
-->'''Gavroche:''' "General, I'm on my way to look for a doctor for my wife who is in labor."

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* DeadpanSnarker: DeadpanSnarker:
**
Javert, in the scene where he arrests the Thénardiers, Thénardiers ("Would you like my hat?"), and to Les Amis, as he's led away by Valjean and believes he's about to be executed.
--> Javert: "See
executed ("See you all immediately!"
--> Javert: "Would you like my hat?"
immediately!").
** Also Gavroche, most hilariously in this exchange with a sergeant of the National Guard:
-->'''Sergeant:''' "Will --->'''Sergeant:''' Will you tell me where you are going, you wretch?"
-->'''Gavroche:''' "General,
wretch?\\
'''Gavroche:''' General,
I'm on my way to look for a doctor for my wife who is in labor."



** Thénardier is a frequent example of this, speaking and writing in a flowery manner that gives him the air of a philosopher/intellectual, but his writing is filled with misspellings, and Hugo comments to the effect that his obsession with [[SesquipedalianLoquaciousness Big Words]] shows a stupid person's understanding of what a smart person sounds like. Thénardier also frequently defends arguments by fraudulent citations of famous people, but has no actual knowledge of those authorities, except that they are famous (e.g. he will cite to the novels of someone who only wrote poetry). His wife also demonstrates this through the odd names she gave to her daughters, taken from romantic novels and popular history. This choice is very similar to the idea underlying a GhettoName.

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** Thénardier is a frequent example of this, speaking and writing in a flowery manner that gives him the air of a philosopher/intellectual, but his writing is filled with misspellings, and Hugo comments to the effect that his obsession with [[SesquipedalianLoquaciousness Big Words]] shows a stupid person's understanding of what a smart person sounds like. Thénardier also frequently defends arguments by fraudulent citations of famous people, but has no actual knowledge of those authorities, except that they are famous (e.g. he will cite to the novels of someone who only wrote poetry). His wife also demonstrates this through the odd names she gave to her daughters, taken from romantic novels and popular history. This choice is very similar to the idea underlying a GhettoName.



* DeusExMachina: Ironically provided by Thénardier, although he does so unwittingly and for purely greedy reasons. Near the end of the novel, he reveals to Marius that Jean Valjean is innocent of the more serious crimes he was suspected of. He also brings proof that Valjean was the mysterious man who risked his life to save Marius. All this just in time for Cosette to see her adoptive father [[spoiler:one last time before his death.]]
* DiedInYourArmsTonight: [[spoiler:Éponine in Marius'.]]

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* DeusExMachina: Ironically provided by Thénardier, although he does so unwittingly and for purely greedy reasons. Near the end of the novel, he reveals to Marius that Jean Valjean is innocent of the more serious crimes he was suspected of. He also brings proof that Valjean was the mysterious man who risked his life to save Marius. All this just in time for Cosette to see her adoptive father [[spoiler:one last time before his death.]]
* DiedInYourArmsTonight: [[spoiler:Éponine in Marius'.]]



* DyingDeclarationOfLove: Éponine to Marius.

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* DyingDeclarationOfLove: Éponine to Marius.



* TheEveryman: Jean Valjean, who was a simple tree pruner before his imprisonment. His name means, literally, "John, here's John." (as "Voilà Jean" became "Valjean")

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* TheEveryman: Jean Valjean, who was a simple tree pruner before his imprisonment. His name means, literally, "John, here's John." (as "Voilà Jean" became "Valjean")



* EvilGloating: Thénardier performs a near textbook example to Valjean when he has him captured in his room in Paris.

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* EvilGloating: Thénardier performs a near textbook example to Valjean when he has him captured in his room in Paris.



* FauxAffablyEvil: Thénardier tries this several times.

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* FauxAffablyEvil: Thénardier tries this several times.



* {{Foil}}: Valjean and Javert, Éponine and Cosette, Montparnasse and Enjolras, and Enjolras and Grantaire.

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* {{Foil}}: Valjean and Javert, Éponine and Cosette, Montparnasse and Enjolras, and Enjolras and Grantaire.



* GirlsWithMoustaches: Mme Thénardier has one.

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* GirlsWithMoustaches: Mme Thénardier has one.



* GreatEscape: When Thénardier and his gang escape from La Force prison, it fills many parts of that trope. Apart from maybe the fact that it's far from being central to the plot.

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* GreatEscape: When Thénardier and his gang escape from La Force prison, it fills many parts of that trope. Apart from maybe the fact that it's far from being central to the plot.



* HiddenSupplies: When the Thénardiers and their gang take him hostage and attempt to blackmail him, Valjean attempts to escape by sawing through his bonds with a tool a watch spring, hidden inside a coin which Hugo informs us is an item invented by convicts. This means that Valjean has had this tool on him all day, every day, for God knows how long just in case he were ever arrested. This also makes him ProperlyParanoid.
* HistoricalDomainCharacter: Napoleon. He features (obviously) in the long description of the battle of Waterloo, but he also has a chance meeting with Myriel, who accidentally flatters him ("I see a great man"). This leads to Myriel`s promotion to bishop in Digne, setting him straight in Valjean`s path at the beginning of the book.

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* HiddenSupplies: When the Thénardiers and their gang take him hostage and attempt to blackmail him, Valjean attempts to escape by sawing through his bonds with a tool a watch spring, hidden inside a coin which Hugo informs us is an item invented by convicts. This means that Valjean has had this tool on him all day, every day, for God knows how long just in case he were ever arrested. This also makes him ProperlyParanoid.
* HistoricalDomainCharacter: HistoricalDomainCharacter:
**
Napoleon. He features (obviously) in the long description of the battle of Waterloo, but he also has a chance meeting with Myriel, who accidentally flatters him ("I see a great man"). This leads to Myriel`s Myriel's promotion to bishop in Digne, setting him straight in Valjean`s Valjean's path at the beginning of the book. book.



* IfICantHaveYou: Éponine to Marius. She gives him a false message that his friends are expecting him at the barricade. Distraught due to the belief that Cosette had left for England, he goes there. Éponine goes back there herself, hoping that they will both die there together.

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* IfICantHaveYou: Éponine to Marius. She gives him a false message that his friends are expecting him at the barricade. Distraught due to the belief that Cosette had left for England, he goes there. Éponine goes back there herself, hoping that they will both die there together.



** Similarly, the convict Chenildieu is nicknamed « Je-nie-Dieu » (I deny God).
** Charles-François Bienvenu Myriel comes to be known in Digne only as "Monseigneur Bienvenu" (meaning "Welcome").
** Fantine is nicknamed "The Blonde" by Tholomyes. His friends' lovers all have nicknames as well: Favorite, Dahlia, and Zéphine.

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** Similarly, the convict Chenildieu is nicknamed « Je-nie-Dieu » "Je-nie-Dieu" (I deny God).
** Charles-François Bienvenu Myriel comes to be known in Digne only as "Monseigneur Bienvenu" (meaning "Welcome").
** Fantine is nicknamed "The Blonde" by Tholomyes.Tholomyès. His friends' lovers all have nicknames as well: Favorite, Dahlia, and Zéphine.



* IronicNickname: Fantine names her baby Euphrasie in a moment of romantic inspiration, but soon calls her "Cosette" all the time (which means "Pampered" or "Indulged"). Then she leaves her child with the Thénardiers, who verbally and physically abuse the child, starve her, and force her to work for her keep -- all the while still calling her "Cosette," little Indulged.

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* IronicNickname: Fantine names her baby Euphrasie in a moment of romantic inspiration, but soon calls her "Cosette" all the time (which means "Pampered" or "Indulged"). Then she leaves her child with the Thénardiers, who verbally and physically abuse the child, starve her, and force her to work for her keep -- all the while still calling her "Cosette," little Indulged.



** Éponine helps Marius to find Cosette, despite the fact that she's also in love with him.
*** But then when Marius thinks Cosette is gone forever and is emotionally vulnerable, Éponine anonymously informs him that his friends have joined the uprising knowing that he'll throw himself onto the barricades, and she goes along too because she would rather they die together than anybody else have him. Although she does belatedly redeem herself somewhat by throwing herself in front of a gun aimed at him, and admitting her dishonesty, Hugo makes it clear that part of her act was just that she did want him to die, she just didn't want to ''see'' it so she chose to go first. And as she's dying in his arms she does say "We're all going to die, and I'm so happy". See IfICantHaveYou above. The musical softened and simplified the character of Éponine considerably, and many fans have absolutely no idea of the moral complexity and culpability of the character as portrayed in the novel.

to:

** Éponine helps Marius to find Cosette, despite the fact that she's also in love with him.
*** But then when Marius thinks Cosette is gone forever and is emotionally vulnerable, Éponine anonymously informs him that his friends have joined the uprising knowing that he'll throw himself onto the barricades, and she goes along too because she would rather they die together than anybody else have him. Although she does belatedly redeem herself somewhat by throwing herself in front of a gun aimed at him, and admitting her dishonesty, Hugo makes it clear that part of her act was just that she did want him to die, she just didn't want to ''see'' it so she chose to go first. And as she's dying in his arms she does say "We're all going to die, and I'm so happy". See IfICantHaveYou above. The musical softened and simplified the character of Éponine considerably, and many fans have absolutely no idea of the moral complexity and culpability of the character as portrayed in the novel.



** Thénardier is never made accountable for his various crimes (which include graverobbing, attempted murder, child abuse, kidnapping, torture, theft, and more child abuse) during the book, and in the epilogue, he takes the money Marius had given to him to travel to America and become a successful slave trader.
** Tholomyès, who abandons Fantine, becomes a successful lawyer. (Though he does get a come-uppance in a deleted scene to the original novel, where his wedding gets called off because a young Cosette (who just happens to be in the audience) calls out 'Papa!') It's suggested that he eventually matures into an honorable man, but that certainly doesn't save Fantine.
* KickTheDog: The Thénardiers do this in just about every scene they're in. Javert also gets a moment when he inadvertently frightens Fantine to death by telling her the mayor is a convict. You'd better believe Valjean wasn't happy about that.

to:

** Thénardier is never made accountable for his various crimes (which include graverobbing, attempted murder, child abuse, kidnapping, torture, theft, and more child abuse) during the book, and in the epilogue, he takes the money Marius had given to him to travel to America and become a successful slave trader.
** Tholomyès, who abandons Fantine, becomes a successful lawyer. (Though he does get a come-uppance in a deleted scene to the original novel, where his wedding gets called off because a young Cosette (who just happens to be in the audience) calls out 'Papa!') It's suggested that he eventually matures into an honorable man, but that certainly doesn't save Fantine.
* KickTheDog: The Thénardiers do this in just about every scene they're in. Javert also gets a moment when he inadvertently frightens Fantine to death by telling her the mayor is a convict. You'd better believe Valjean wasn't happy about that.



* LastRequest: After TakingTheBullet for Marius, Éponine requests a kiss on the forehead from him after she dies. He grants her request.

to:

* LastRequest: After TakingTheBullet for Marius, Éponine requests a kiss on the forehead from him after she dies. He grants her request.



* LostInTranslation: Hugo makes use of untranslatable puns and argot/slang. An example of a pun is the name of a bagnard named Chenildieu, who's nicknamed je-nie-Dieu, "I deny God"; another is a character admiring the "glaces" (mirrors) in a restaurant, and another replying that she'd rather have "glacés" (ice cream) on her plate.

to:

* LostInTranslation: Hugo makes use of untranslatable puns and argot/slang. An example of a pun is the name of a bagnard named Chenildieu, who's nicknamed je-nie-Dieu, "I deny God"; another is a character admiring the "glaces" (mirrors) in a restaurant, and another replying that she'd rather have "glacés" (ice cream) on her plate.



*** The Swedish translation is ''Samhällets Olycksbarn'' that translates to roughly "The Society's unfortunate children"
** The student revolutionary group, Les Amis de l'ABC, literally translates as "the friends of the ABC." However, ABC in French would be pronounced ah-beh-sey, sounding like abaissé the French word for "abased," also translated as "wretched" or "oppressed." So the name of the group actually means Friends of the Oppressed, since they are all about helping the poor.

to:

*** The Swedish translation is ''Samhällets Olycksbarn'' that translates to roughly "The Society's unfortunate children"
** The student revolutionary group, Les Amis de l'ABC, literally translates as "the friends of the ABC." However, ABC in French would be pronounced ah-beh-sey, sounding like abaissé the French word for "abased," also translated as "wretched" or "oppressed." So the name of the group actually means Friends of the Oppressed, since they are all about helping the poor.



* LoveTriangle: Marius, Cosette, Éponine.
* MeaningfulName: Many, many, many.
** Fantine from "enfantine", childish. Derived from the Latin "enfans", 'one who cannot yet speak'. Éponine's (derived from the Greek "épos", 'word') and Euphrasie's ("beautiful way of speaking", Latin) names are also related to the concept of voice, and many critics consider this a mark of Hugo's feminists (for his time) views.
** Valjean is an abbreviation of "Voilà Jean" (Here's Jean). It doesn't help that it's the single most common French first name.

to:

* LoveTriangle: Marius, Cosette, Éponine.
* MeaningfulName: Many, many, many.
MeaningfulName:
** Fantine from "enfantine", childish. Derived from the Latin "enfans", 'one who cannot yet speak'. Éponine's (derived from the Greek "épos", 'word') and Euphrasie's ("beautiful way of speaking", Latin) names are also related to the concept of voice, and many critics consider this a mark of Hugo's feminists (for his time) views.
** Valjean is an abbreviation of "Voilà Jean" (Here's Jean). It doesn't help that it's the single most common French first name.



** Bishop Charles-François Bienvenu Myriel becomes known only as Monseigneur Bienvenu (Bienvenu means welcome).

to:

** Bishop Charles-François Bienvenu Myriel becomes known only as Monseigneur Bienvenu (Bienvenu means welcome).



** Éponine is the French version of Epponina, the name of the wife of the anti-Roman Gaulish resistor Julius Sabinus. The historical Epponina did everything she could for the man she loved, and while Éponine falters between selfishness and selflessness in her love for Marius, she ultimately [[spoiler:takes a bullet for him and dies in his arms]]. It's also ironic, as it's a highly romantic and aristocratic name for a street waif.
** Enjolras can be read as "il enjôlera", meaning he is the one who "will seduce/coax" which makes sense since he's one of the leaders of the riot. Meanwhile, Grantaire's name could be interpreted as a pun on the name of the letter R (it's homophone to "grand r", 'capital r') or on the idiom "avoir grand air" ('to be distinguished, to be elegant'), as Hugo describes his as an ugly, cynical drunkard.

to:

** Éponine is the French version of Epponina, the name of the wife of the anti-Roman Gaulish resistor Julius Sabinus. The historical Epponina did everything she could for the man she loved, and while Éponine falters between selfishness and selflessness in her love for Marius, she ultimately [[spoiler:takes a bullet for him and dies in his arms]]. It's also ironic, as it's a highly romantic and aristocratic name for a street waif.
** Enjolras can be read as "il enjôlera", meaning he is the one who "will seduce/coax" which makes sense since he's one of the leaders of the riot. Meanwhile, Grantaire's name could be interpreted as a pun on the name of the letter R (it's homophone to "grand r", 'capital r') or on the idiom "avoir grand air" ('to be distinguished, to be elegant'), as Hugo describes his as an ugly, cynical drunkard.



* NiceJobBreakingItHero: Although he eventually decided it was the only option to take, from a more utilitarian point of view Valjean giving up his identity resulted only in catastrophes: It hastened Fantine's death (although she might not have lived much longer anyway), got Valjean nearly executed (he got pardoned... to life imprisonment), meant that Cosette had to stay nine months longer with the Thénardiers, and completely ruined the town of Montreuil-sur-Mer. Keeping that in mind, sacrificing Champmathieu doesn't seem quite as terrible anymore.

to:

* NiceJobBreakingItHero: NiceJobBreakingItHero:
**
Although he eventually decided it was the only option to take, from a more utilitarian point of view Valjean giving up his identity resulted only in catastrophes: It hastened Fantine's death (although she might not have lived much longer anyway), got Valjean nearly executed (he got pardoned... to life imprisonment), meant that Cosette had to stay nine months longer with the Thénardiers, and completely ruined the town of Montreuil-sur-Mer. Keeping that in mind, sacrificing Champmathieu doesn't seem quite as terrible anymore.



* NiceJobFixingItVillain: Thénardier goes to Marius to blackmail him with his knowledge about Valjean, but ends up telling Marius that Valjean a) did not rob M Madeleine (as he WAS M Madeleine), b) did not [[spoiler:kill Javert (as Javert killed himself)]], and c) saved Marius from the barricade (although Thénardier believed him to have killed Marius to rob him). Although Marius and Cosette arrive [[spoiler:too late to save Valjean, he dies with Cosette at his side and the knowledge that the two know that he was not a bad man.]]

to:

* NiceJobFixingItVillain: Thénardier goes to Marius to blackmail him with his knowledge about Valjean, but ends up telling Marius that Valjean a) did not rob M Madeleine (as he WAS M Madeleine), b) did not [[spoiler:kill Javert (as Javert killed himself)]], and c) saved Marius from the barricade (although Thénardier believed him to have killed Marius to rob him). Although Marius and Cosette arrive [[spoiler:too late to save Valjean, he dies with Cosette at his side and the knowledge that the two know that he was not a bad man.]]



* NoNameGiven: Inspector Javert (fans like to joke about Javert's first name actually being "Inspector"), Fantine (rare case of first name only), both Thénardiers, all of the students except Je(h)an Prouvaire and Marius Pontmercy, and many more.

to:

* NoNameGiven: Inspector Javert (fans like to joke about Javert's first name actually being "Inspector"), Fantine (rare case of first name only), both Thénardiers, all of the students except Je(h)an Prouvaire and Marius Pontmercy, and many more.



** Azelma (Éponine's little sister) looks like a sickly 11- or 12-year-old by the time she's 14.

to:

** Azelma (Éponine's little sister) looks like a sickly 11- or 12-year-old by the time she's 14.



-->'''Jean Valjean:''' Mlle Euphrasie Fauchelevent has five thousand francs a year.
-->'''M. Gillenormand''': Well, good for Mlle Euphrasie Fauchelevent, but who's ''that''?
-->'''Cosette:''' Er... that's me.
** Two of Tholomyes' friends' mistresses, Favourite and Dahlia.

to:

-->'''Jean --->'''Jean Valjean:''' Mlle Euphrasie Fauchelevent has five thousand francs a year.
-->'''M.
year.\\
'''M.
Gillenormand''': Well, good for Mlle Euphrasie Fauchelevent, but who's ''that''?
-->'''Cosette:'''
''that''?\\
'''Cosette:'''
Er... that's me.
** Two of Tholomyes' Tholomyès' friends' mistresses, Favourite and Dahlia.



** Gavroche is the unloved oldest son of the Thénardiers, who lives in the streets
** The Thénardiers sell their two youngest sons to Manon, after Manon's own children (whom she claims were fathered by Gillenormand, who pays her for their keep) die from illness.

to:

** Gavroche is the unloved oldest son of the Thénardiers, who lives in the streets
** The Thénardiers sell their two youngest sons to Manon, after Manon's own children (whom she claims were fathered by Gillenormand, who pays her for their keep) die from illness.



* ParentalFavoritism: Mme Thénardier clearly favours her own daughters over Cosette. Averted, in that this doesn't extend to her sons, though.
* PassingTheTorch: Several torches are passed, not all of them heroic. Cosette and Marius resolve to follow Valjean's lead, but on the other hand Azelma Thénardier takes over smoothly from her dead mother and Gavroche's younger brothers pick up where he left off.
* {{Patronymic}}: Jean Valjean is named after his father who, also being named Jean, got the fake-surname Valjean as a contraction of Voilà Jean, a surname that used to also be called "Vlajean."

to:

* ParentalFavoritism: Mme Thénardier clearly favours her own daughters over Cosette. Averted, in that this doesn't extend to her sons, though.
* PassingTheTorch: Several torches are passed, not all of them heroic. Cosette and Marius resolve to follow Valjean's lead, but on the other hand Azelma Thénardier takes over smoothly from her dead mother and Gavroche's younger brothers pick up where he left off.
* {{Patronymic}}: Jean Valjean is named after his father who, also being named Jean, got the fake-surname Valjean as a contraction of Voilà Jean, a surname that used to also be called "Vlajean."



* PunnyName: Many. For example, Jean Valjean is supposed to be a contraction of "Voilà Jean" "Here's Jean". Still better than one of the names Hugo considered earlier: "Jean Sou" (figuratively "Jean Penny"). Grantaire usually signs as "R" (a pun on the pronunciation of his surname, which sounds like "capital r" in French). There're also a few jokes with Bossuet's surname, which nobody knows whether it's spelled L'Aigle ("the eagle"), Lesgles or Legle.
** Les Amis de l'ABC allegedly named themselves that way because they're a society for furthering literacy among the poorer classes; it's a mere coincidence, of course, that in French "l'ABC" sounds exactly like "l'abaisé", "the oppressed". [[HiddenInPlainSight No revolutionary inclinations whatsoever]].

to:

* PunnyName: Many. For example, PunnyName:
**
Jean Valjean is supposed to be a contraction of "Voilà Jean" "Here's Jean". Still better than one of the names Hugo considered earlier: "Jean Sou" (figuratively "Jean Penny"). Penny").
**
Grantaire usually signs as "R" (a pun on the pronunciation of his surname, which sounds like "capital r" in French). French).
**
There're also a few jokes with Bossuet's surname, which nobody knows whether it's spelled L'Aigle ("the eagle"), Lesgles or Legle.
** Les Amis de l'ABC allegedly named themselves that way because they're a society for furthering literacy among the poorer classes; it's a mere coincidence, of course, that in French "l'ABC" sounds exactly like "l'abaisé", "the oppressed". [[HiddenInPlainSight No revolutionary inclinations whatsoever]].



* RagsToRiches: Valjean as M Madeleine, Cosette when he adopts her. Throughout the novel, the economic position or evolution of a character marks him or her either as "one of the misérables" (not a good thing to be marked as, in this book) or as someone who could actually get a happy ending.

to:

* RagsToRiches: Valjean as M Madeleine, Cosette when he adopts her. Throughout the novel, the economic position or evolution of a character marks him or her either as "one of the misérables" (not a good thing to be marked as, in this book) or as someone who could actually get a happy ending.



** The Anticlimax happens again when Thénardier, having fallen in to ruin, is scamming money off some people he heard were generous. He comes across Valjean again, and soon after the meeting reveals this. A passing line is made about a hundred pages later about how the reader probably guessed this before him.
* TheRevolutionWillNotBeVilified: The Friends of the ABC are portrayed as heroic defenders of the common man, right down to the token drunkard. To balance the scale, however, the sympathetic Bishop Myriel is described as a once-noble victim of the Revolution of 1789, and early in the book has a debate with a dying revolutionary regarding who deserves more pity, the poor, or the nobles who are murdered for a crime that is not their fault.
** While he wasn't blind to the crimes committed in its name, Hugo greatly admired the French Revolution. His last novel, ''93'', is focused on it.

to:

** The Anticlimax happens again when Thénardier, having fallen in to ruin, is scamming money off some people he heard were generous. He comes across Valjean again, and soon after the meeting reveals this. A passing line is made about a hundred pages later about how the reader probably guessed this before him.
* TheRevolutionWillNotBeVilified: The Friends of the ABC are portrayed as heroic defenders of the common man, right down to the token drunkard. To balance the scale, however, the sympathetic Bishop Myriel is described as a once-noble victim of the Revolution of 1789, and early in the book has a debate with a dying revolutionary regarding who deserves more pity, the poor, or the nobles who are murdered for a crime that is not their fault.
**
fault. While he wasn't blind to the crimes committed in its name, Hugo greatly admired the French Revolution. His last novel, ''93'', is focused on it.



* RougeAnglesOfSatin: Thénardier writes with such creative spelling that it makes his letters recognisable.
* SadisticChoice: Marius has to choose whether to get Thénardier arrested (to save his love interest's father), even though it was his father's LastRequest for Marius to repay Thénardier for saving his life. See TakeAThirdOption below.

to:

* RougeAnglesOfSatin: Thénardier writes with such creative spelling that it makes his letters recognisable.
* SadisticChoice: Marius has to choose whether to get Thénardier arrested (to save his love interest's father), even though it was his father's LastRequest for Marius to repay Thénardier for saving his life. See TakeAThirdOption below.



* SlasherSmile: When Madam Thénardier tries to produce a friendly smile (towards Cosette), the author states she looks ''even scarier'' than usual.

to:

* SlasherSmile: When Madam Thénardier tries to produce a friendly smile (towards Cosette), the author states she looks ''even scarier'' than usual.



* SpiritualSuccessor: What Les Misérables is to ''Claude Gueux'' and ''Literature/TheLastDayOfACondemnedMan''. Only much longer.
* SpoiledBrat: Éponine and Azelma as long as their parents can afford it.

to:

* SpiritualSuccessor: What Les Misérables is to ''Claude Gueux'' and ''Literature/TheLastDayOfACondemnedMan''. Only much longer.
* SpoiledBrat: Éponine and Azelma as long as their parents can afford it.



** Éponine. Heavy focus on the word "stalker." Trying to kill him so that they can both die together is more creepy than romantic.

to:

** Éponine. Heavy focus on the word "stalker." Trying to kill him so that they can both die together is more creepy than romantic.



* TakeAThirdOption: Rather than getting Thénardier arrested (against his father's LastRequest) or leaving Valjean tied up at Thénardier's mercy, he throws [[ChekhovsGun Éponine's note]] ("The bobbies are coming") into the room, causing the criminals to flee.
* TakingTheBullet: Éponine for Marius. A soldier makes it in the barricade and aims his musket at Marius, but Éponine steps between them and takes the fatal shot herself.

to:

* TakeAThirdOption: Rather than getting Thénardier arrested (against his father's LastRequest) or leaving Valjean tied up at Thénardier's mercy, he throws [[ChekhovsGun Éponine's note]] ("The bobbies are coming") into the room, causing the criminals to flee.
* TakingTheBullet: Éponine for Marius. A soldier makes it in the barricade and aims his musket at Marius, but Éponine steps between them and takes the fatal shot herself.



-->Besides, there is a point when the unfortunate and the infamous are associated and confused in a word, a mortal word, ''les misérables''; whose fault is it? And then, when the fall is furthest, is that not when charity should be greatest?
* TogetherInDeath: What Éponine hopes will happen to her and Marius. [[spoiler:Sadly (for her), he survives.]]

to:

-->Besides, there is a point when the unfortunate and the infamous are associated and confused in a word, a mortal word, ''les misérables''; whose fault is it? And then, when the fall is furthest, is that not when charity should be greatest?
* TogetherInDeath: TogetherInDeath:
**
What Éponine hopes will happen to her and Marius. [[spoiler:Sadly (for her), he survives.]]



* TraumaticHaircut: Fantine gets one to pay for her daughter.

to:

* TraumaticHaircut: TraumaticHaircut:
**
Fantine gets one to pay for her daughter.



* TroublingUnchildlikeBehavior: Despite being only eleven or twelve years old, Gavroche eventually steals a gun and joins the revolutionaries at the barricade. When the gun he stole doesn't work, he badgers Enjolras for a new one. Somewhat [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] when Enjolras replies that the guns are for men first.
** Cosette as a child shows signs of this, thanks to living in constant fear because of how badly she's been abused. When she overhears Valjean telling Thénardier that Fantine has passed away, she picks up the little knife she uses as a doll and rocks it while singing "My mother is dead! My mother is dead!" She also mentions using her knife to cut the heads off of flies. The narration says that at age eight, an observer might think she's growing up to be "an idiot or a demon". Fortunately, Valjean's love and care for her helps her psychologically heal, and she matures into a happy, well-adjusted young woman.

to:

* TroublingUnchildlikeBehavior: TroublingUnchildlikeBehavior:
**
Despite being only eleven or twelve years old, Gavroche eventually steals a gun and joins the revolutionaries at the barricade. When the gun he stole doesn't work, he badgers Enjolras for a new one. Somewhat [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] when Enjolras replies that the guns are for men first.
** Cosette as a child shows signs of this, thanks to living in constant fear because of how badly she's been abused. When she overhears Valjean telling Thénardier that Fantine has passed away, she picks up the little knife she uses as a doll and rocks it while singing "My mother is dead! My mother is dead!" She also mentions using her knife to cut the heads off of flies. The narration says that at age eight, an observer might think she's growing up to be "an idiot or a demon". Fortunately, Valjean's love and care for her helps her psychologically heal, and she matures into a happy, well-adjusted young woman.



--> ''He beheld before him two paths, both equally straight, but he beheld two; and that terrified him; him, who had never in all his life known more than one straight line. And, the poignant anguish lay in this, that the two paths were contrary to each other. One of these straight lines excluded the other. Which of the two was the true one?...''
--> '' ... There were only two ways of escaping from it. One was to go resolutely to Jean Valjean, and restore to his cell the convict from the galleys. [[DrivenToSuicide The other . . .]]''

to:

--> ''He -->He beheld before him two paths, both equally straight, but he beheld two; and that terrified him; him, who had never in all his life known more than one straight line. And, the poignant anguish lay in this, that the two paths were contrary to each other. One of these straight lines excluded the other. Which of the two was the true one?...''
--> '' ...
one?...
-->...
There were only two ways of escaping from it. One was to go resolutely to Jean Valjean, and restore to his cell the convict from the galleys. [[DrivenToSuicide The other . . .]]''



* WhatYouAreInTheDark: Jean Valjean all the way. His greatest sacrifices always happens after a long inner struggle, and ''all of them'' go unnoticed. He almost insists on slandering himself because nobody are supposed to know. Thus, he saves Champmathieu, ruining his name as a mayor, he takes Cosette out of the monastery only to set her in the path of Marius, whom he later saves from the barricades. In the last instance, he makes it pretty clear that Marius is meant to never find out who saved him. When he deliberately blows his cover for Marius after the wedding, he slanders himself ''even more'', to a point where Marius mistrusts him and denies him access to Cosette (which nearly kills him). It takes the interference of Thénardier to set things straight.

to:

* WhatYouAreInTheDark: Jean Valjean all the way. His greatest sacrifices always happens after a long inner struggle, and ''all of them'' go unnoticed. He almost insists on slandering himself because nobody are supposed to know. Thus, he saves Champmathieu, ruining his name as a mayor, he takes Cosette out of the monastery only to set her in the path of Marius, whom he later saves from the barricades. In the last instance, he makes it pretty clear that Marius is meant to never find out who saved him. When he deliberately blows his cover for Marius after the wedding, he slanders himself ''even more'', to a point where Marius mistrusts him and denies him access to Cosette (which nearly kills him). It takes the interference of Thénardier to set things straight.



* WholesomeCrossdresser: Éponine, who dresses as a boy at the barricades.

to:

* WholesomeCrossdresser: Éponine, who dresses as a boy at the barricades.



* WouldHurtAChild: Rare female example, as M Thénardier's cruelty towards Cosette is more along the lines of making her walk barefoot in winter. Only Madame Thénardier (regularly) kicks and beats Cosette. Just before Valjean takes her, however, she announces she's going to kick Cosette out the next day, which Thénardier is perfectly fine with, despite the fact that she would likely die if they did this.

to:

* WouldHurtAChild: Rare female example, as M Thénardier's cruelty towards Cosette is more along the lines of making her walk barefoot in winter. Only Madame Thénardier (regularly) kicks and beats Cosette. Just before Valjean takes her, however, she announces she's going to kick Cosette out the next day, which Thénardier is perfectly fine with, despite the fact that she would likely die if they did this.



** Fantine has finally been rescued from her misery and six months in jail by Madeleine, who promises to get her daughter. And then Thénardier refuses again and again to bring the child, and Javert arrests Madeleine right at her bedside, revealing that he's a wanted criminal. The shock kills her.

to:

** Fantine has finally been rescued from her misery and six months in jail by Madeleine, who promises to get her daughter. And then Thénardier refuses again and again to bring the child, and Javert arrests Madeleine right at her bedside, revealing that he's a wanted criminal. The shock kills her.



* YoungerThanTheyLook: Played with with Éponine, who's still noticeably 16, but at the same time has rather badly aged skin already due to her life of deprivation and poverty. By her second appearance as a teen, however, she's much happier, and accordingly is described as looking considerably prettier.

to:

* YoungerThanTheyLook: YoungerThanTheyLook:
**
Played with with Éponine, who's still noticeably 16, but at the same time has rather badly aged skin already due to her life of deprivation and poverty. By her second appearance as a teen, however, she's much happier, and accordingly is described as looking considerably prettier.



* YouShallNotPass: Eponine towards the Patron-Mignette when they try to rob Jean ValJean´s house.

to:

* YouShallNotPass: Eponine Éponine towards the Patron-Mignette when they try to rob Jean ValJean´s house.ValJean's house.
----
13th Feb '16 10:59:16 AM Eilevgmyhren
Is there an issue? Send a Message


---> '''Eponine''': [[YouShallNotPass You are not getting inside]]. I am not a pup, I am a wolf cub. You are six. What do I care about that? You cannot scare me. You will not go inside this house, because I do not wish it. If you get closer, I will bark. I said there was a dog there. That dog is me. So get away all of you. If you use the knife, I will use my legs. By God I am not afraid of you. I will hunger during summer and freeze during winter, and such stupid men believe they can scare me? Scare! What? That´s too funny. Its because you have some petty women who hide under their beds when you roar. I am not afraid. Not even for you (''towards her father'').

to:

---> '''Eponine''': [[YouShallNotPass You are not getting inside]]. I am not a pup, I am a wolf cub. You are six. What do I care about that? You cannot scare me. You will not go inside this house, because I do not wish it. If you get closer, I will bark. I said there was a dog there. That dog is me. So get away all of you. If you use the knife, I will use my legs. By God I am not afraid of you. In the summer, I will hunger during summer and freeze during winter, starve, in the winter I freeze, and such stupid men believe they can scare me? Scare! What? That´s too funny. Its because you have some petty women who hide under their beds when you roar. I am not afraid. Not even for you (''towards her father'').
13th Feb '16 9:58:41 AM Eilevgmyhren
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** By the time Fantine dies at 25, she's frail and white-haired.

to:

** By the time Fantine dies at 25, she's frail and white-haired.white-haired.
* YouShallNotPass: Eponine towards the Patron-Mignette when they try to rob Jean ValJean´s house.
13th Feb '16 9:55:59 AM Eilevgmyhren
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Eponine delivers a truly epic one when she decides to defend Cosette, Marius and Jean Valjean from the Patron-Mignette. Consider that she stands up against ''six hardass brutes'', including her own father.
---> '''Eponine''': [[YouShallNotPass You are not getting inside]]. I am not a pup, I am a wolf cub. You are six. What do I care about that? You cannot scare me. You will not go inside this house, because I do not wish it. If you get closer, I will bark. I said there was a dog there. That dog is me. So get away all of you. If you use the knife, I will use my legs. By God I am not afraid of you. I will hunger during summer and freeze during winter, and such stupid men believe they can scare me? Scare! What? That´s too funny. Its because you have some petty women who hide under their beds when you roar. I am not afraid. Not even for you (''towards her father'').
23rd Jan '16 8:08:12 PM Vismutti
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* RagsToRiches: Valjean as M Madeleine, Cosete when he adopts her. Throughout the novel, the economic position or evolution of a character marks him or her either as "one of the misérables" (not a good thing to be marked as, in this book) or as someone who could actually get a happy ending.

to:

* RagsToRiches: Valjean as M Madeleine, Cosete Cosette when he adopts her. Throughout the novel, the economic position or evolution of a character marks him or her either as "one of the misérables" (not a good thing to be marked as, in this book) or as someone who could actually get a happy ending.
23rd Jan '16 8:07:53 PM Vismutti
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** Les Amis de l'ABC allegedly named themselves that way because they're a society for furthering literacy among the poorer classes; it's a mere coincidence, of course, that in French "l'ABC" sounds exactly like "l'abbaisé", "the oppressed". [[HiddenInPlainSight No revolutionary inclinations whatsoever]].

to:

** Les Amis de l'ABC allegedly named themselves that way because they're a society for furthering literacy among the poorer classes; it's a mere coincidence, of course, that in French "l'ABC" sounds exactly like "l'abbaisé", "l'abaisé", "the oppressed". [[HiddenInPlainSight No revolutionary inclinations whatsoever]].
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