History Literature / LeMorteDArthur

3rd May '16 10:39:24 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* MosesInTheBullrushes: See NiceJobBreakingItHerod

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* MosesInTheBullrushes: MosesInTheBulrushes: See NiceJobBreakingItHerod
18th Apr '16 6:38:21 PM kkhohoho
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* {{Badass}}: Actually, a WorldOfBadass: Almost every named knight in the legend kicks ass, but those who worth to be mentioned are Sir Lancelot, Sir Tristram, Sir Galahad, Sir Breunor le Noire (or La Cote Male Tale), Balin, Sir Gareth, Sir Gawain, Sir Perceval and King Arthur himself.

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* {{Badass}}: Actually, a WorldOfBadass: Almost every named knight in the legend kicks ass, but those who worth to be are worthy of being mentioned are include Sir Lancelot, Sir Tristram, Sir Galahad, Sir Breunor le Noire (or La Cote Male Tale), Balin, Sir Gareth, Sir Gawain, Sir Perceval and King Arthur himself.
19th Feb '16 3:31:12 AM alchixinren
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''Le Morte d'Arthur'' is medieval French for ''The Death of Arthur''; it was originally only the title of the 8th and last "book" of Malory's narrative, which ''he'' might have named ''The Hoole Booke of Kyng Arthur & of His Noble Knyghtes of the Rounde Table''[[labelnote:*]]''The Whole Book of King Arthur & of His Noble Knights of the Round Table''.[[/labelnote]]. It was [[ExecutiveMeddling Caxton that changed the title]] to the one that was afterwards almost universally used, presumably because it was shorter.

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''Le Morte d'Arthur'' is medieval French for ''The "The Death of Arthur''; Arthur"[[note]]This is GratuitousFrench, and really ought to be rendered "la mort d'Arthur"[[/note]]; it was originally only the title of the 8th and last "book" of Malory's narrative, which ''he'' might have named ''The Hoole Booke of Kyng Arthur & of His Noble Knyghtes of the Rounde Table''[[labelnote:*]]''The Whole Book of King Arthur & of His Noble Knights of the Round Table''.[[/labelnote]]. It was [[ExecutiveMeddling Caxton that changed the title]] to the one that was afterwards almost universally used, presumably because it was shorter.
23rd Jul '15 10:40:25 AM Library-Cat
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Added DiffLines:

* ButtMonkey: King Mark upon leaving Cornwall in Book X (Caxton numbering). All the famous parts of the Tristram and Isolde story, except their deaths, happened in Book VIII and have become famous in-story, and everyone Mark meets on his journey accuse him of being "the falsest king and knight" for standing in Tristram's way. It reaches the point of Arthur and his court trolling Mark by writing an [[TrollFic intentionally bad lay]] about him.
19th Jul '15 1:36:16 PM Anorgil
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* BlastingItOutOfTheirHands: Yes, really. During the fight between Arthur and Accolon of Gaul, just as Accolon was about to strike Arthur down, the Lady of the Lake magically disarmed Accolon, Expelliarmus-style.

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* BlastingItOutOfTheirHands: Yes, really. During the fight between Arthur and Accolon of Gaul, just as Accolon was about to strike Arthur down, the Lady of the Lake magically disarmed Accolon, Expelliarmus-style.
19th Jul '15 1:35:56 PM Anorgil
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* BlastingItOutOfTheirHands: Yes, really. During the fight between Arthur and Accolon of Gaul, just as Accolon was about to strike Arthur down with Excalibur, the Lady of the Lake magically disarmed Accolon, Expelliarmus-style.

to:

* BlastingItOutOfTheirHands: Yes, really. During the fight between Arthur and Accolon of Gaul, just as Accolon was about to strike Arthur down with Excalibur, down, the Lady of the Lake magically disarmed Accolon, Expelliarmus-style.
19th Jul '15 1:35:26 PM Anorgil
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Added DiffLines:

* BlastingItOutOfTheirHands: Yes, really. During the fight between Arthur and Accolon of Gaul, just as Accolon was about to strike Arthur down with Excalibur, the Lady of the Lake magically disarmed Accolon, Expelliarmus-style.
8th May '15 6:48:24 PM Fireblood
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* EatsBabies: When King Arthur finally finds the lair of the ogre who raped and killed the Duchess of Brittany, he sees this gruesome scene: The ogre just over there resting while some captive damsels are roasting like a dozen of impaled babies over a campfire, as if they were chicken. The King's justice after that just gives satisfaction for such a crime.
* ElephantInTheLivingRoom: When things start coming to a head with Guenivere's affair with Lancelot, it is established that Arthur has known, or at least suspected the truth for a long time. Being the good king he is, he expresses the opinion that he cares less about his queen than having a good fellowship of knights. Queens are easy to find.

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* EatsBabies: When King Arthur finally finds the lair of the ogre who raped and killed the Duchess of Brittany, he sees this gruesome scene: The the ogre just over there resting while some captive damsels are roasting like about a dozen of impaled babies over a campfire, as if they were chicken. The King's justice after that just gives satisfaction for such a crime.
* ElephantInTheLivingRoom: When things start coming to a head with Guenivere's affair with Lancelot, it is established that Arthur has known, known or at least suspected the truth for a long time. Being the good king he is, he expresses the opinion that he cares less about his queen than having a good fellowship of knights. Queens are easy to find.



* NiceJobBreakingItHerod: Probably the version that first added this bit to the Arthur legendarium. It's with Sir Mordred, of course. He's sent off on a raft with all those who share his birth date to starve on the ocean. He's the only one who survives, is fostered by a shepherd, and returned to court at 14 where his lineage is recognised.

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* NiceJobBreakingItHerod: Probably the version that first added this bit to the Arthur legendarium. It's with Sir Mordred, of course. He's sent off on a raft with all those who share his birth date to starve on the ocean. He's the only one who survives, is fostered by a shepherd, and returned to court at 14 where his lineage is recognised.recognized.



* {{Tsundere}}: Queen Guinevere

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* {{Tsundere}}: Queen GuinevereGuinevere.
8th May '15 6:34:30 PM Fireblood
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* KilledOffScreen: [[spoiler:Sir Tristram. He inexplicably disappears, when we discover he's dead, and eventually we discover how. Iseult and Mark follow suit.]]

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* KilledOffScreen: [[spoiler:Sir Tristram. He inexplicably disappears, when then we discover he's dead, and eventually we discover how. Iseult and Mark follow suit.]]



* KingInTheMountain: Malory mentions that many believe Arthur will come again when England needs.

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* KingInTheMountain: Malory mentions that many believe Arthur will come again when England needs.has need of him.



* MutualKill: King Arthur and Sir Mordred

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* MutualKill: King Arthur and Sir MordredMordred.



* SurprisinglySuddenDeath: Due to the laconic style, many deaths feel this way to the modern reader, with little-to-no build-up. For example, when Lancelot is caught in Guenivere's bed by fourteen knights all at once, he kills one to get armour, and then twelve more of them in a paragraph, including important characters such as [[spoiler:Sir Agravain.]]

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* SurprisinglySuddenDeath: Due to the laconic style, many deaths feel this way to the modern reader, with little-to-no build-up. For example, when Lancelot is caught in Guenivere's bed by fourteen knights all at once, he kills one to get armour, armor, and then twelve more of them in a paragraph, including important characters such as [[spoiler:Sir Agravain.]]



* ValuesDissonance: Blink and you'll miss it, but Lancelot does actually kill a poor carter in Book XIX for not giving him the cart he's using immediately. See the rape- and incest-related entries for more.
8th May '15 6:26:35 PM Fireblood
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The author of the book has caused much speculation among scholars. It is generally agreed that the author was a man named Thomas Malory who was born in a small town near Warwick called Newbold Revel. Malory served as the Member of Parliament from Warwick, but he is mostly known from his arrest record. Ironically, in popular scholarly opinion, Malory was himself an evil knight, who wrote the tale during various stints in prison for robbery, murder, and even rape. [[UsefulNotes/WarsOfTheRoses The political situation in England at the time was not pretty]], and in many ways the book and its author are a product of their period. Of course, as there is record of a number of 'Sir Thomas Malorys' alive at the time, there is no certainty which of them was the author.

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The author of the book has caused much speculation among scholars. It is generally agreed that the author was a man named Thomas Malory who was born in a small town near Warwick called Newbold Revel. Malory served as the Member of Parliament from Warwick, but he is mostly known from his arrest record. Ironically, in popular scholarly opinion, Malory was himself an evil knight, who wrote the tale during various stints in prison for robbery, murder, and even rape. [[note]] However, he was only convicted of one charge, theft, and "rape" in this period could also mean having consensual sex with a married woman without permission of her husband.[[/note]] [[UsefulNotes/WarsOfTheRoses The political situation in England at the time was not pretty]], and in many ways the book and its author are a product of their period. Of course, as there is record of a number of 'Sir Thomas Malorys' alive at the time, there is no certainty which of them was the author.



** Also Sir Lancelot. Almost every time someone says anything about X knight to be the strongest and noblest knight he's ever seen, he immediatly will say "except Sir Lancelot". Sir Tristram does it constantly to himself.

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** Also Sir Lancelot. Almost every time someone says anything about X knight to be the strongest and noblest knight he's ever seen, he immediatly immediately will say "except Sir Lancelot". Sir Tristram does it constantly to himself.



* DeadpanSnarker: Sir Dinadan

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* DeadpanSnarker: Sir DinadanDinadan.



* DoubleStandardRapeFemaleOnMale: Elaine of Corbin has her maid enchant Lancelot so he believes she is Guinevere. He and the Queen are pretty annoyed about it, but nobody raises that it is actually rape, and the subsequent son manages to be the holiest of all knights anyway.

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* DoubleStandardRapeFemaleOnMale: Elaine of Corbin has her maid enchant Lancelot so he believes she is Guinevere. He and the Queen are pretty annoyed about it, but nobody raises that it is actually rape, and the subsequent son manages to be the holiest of all knights anyway. At the time, rape was defined ''solely'' as a man having sexual intercourse with a woman.



* FanNickname: As stated above, this definitive rendition of Arthurian legend originally had a much longer name. It was later called ''Le Morte d'Arthur'' by publisher William Caxton, possibly because it was the most well-known part of the rendition.



* GroinAttack: Just before delivering the finishing blow, King Arthur castrates the Duchess raper and babies eater ogre with a swing of his sword.

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* GroinAttack: Just before delivering the finishing blow, King Arthur castrates the Duchess raper and babies eater baby-eating rapist ogre with a swing of his sword.
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