History Literature / LeMorteDArthur

28th Oct '17 10:32:13 AM karstovich2
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Sir Thomas Malory (c. 1405--1471; his name is also spelt Mallory and a handful of other variants) was an English writer. His version of the KingArthur legends, ''Le Morte d'Arthur'', is [[AudienceColoringAdaptation treated as the definitive version]] in popular culture.

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Sir Thomas Malory (c. 1405--1471; his name is also spelt Mallory and a handful of other variants) was an English writer. His version of the KingArthur legends, ''Le Morte d'Arthur'', is [[AudienceColoringAdaptation treated as the definitive version]] in popular culture.
culture. Despite the GratuitousFrench title (it's medieval French for "The Death of Arthur"[[note]]And also incorrect; it really ought to be rendered "la mort d'Arthur"[[/note]]), the book is in a form of [[UsefulNotes/HistoryOfEnglish Late Middle English]] virtually indistinguishable from Early Modern English (if you modernize the spelling, what you get is virtually indistinguishable from the Elizabethan English of Shakespeare's day).[[note]]This being said, if you heard Malory reading this aloud to you, you would have only the vaguest idea what he was saying on account of the vowel shifts.[[/note]]



''Le Morte d'Arthur'' is medieval French for "The Death of Arthur"[[note]]This is GratuitousFrench, and really ought to be rendered "la mort d'Arthur"[[/note]]; it was originally only the title of the 8th and last "book" of Malory's narrative, which ''he'' might have named ''The Hoole Booke of Kyng Arthur & of His Noble Knyghtes of the Rounde Table''[[labelnote:*]]''The Whole Book of King Arthur & of His Noble Knights of the Round Table''.[[/labelnote]]. It was [[ExecutiveMeddling Caxton that changed the title]] to the one that was afterwards almost universally used, presumably because it was shorter.

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''Le Morte d'Arthur'' is medieval French for literally translates to "The Death of Arthur"[[note]]This is GratuitousFrench, and really ought to be rendered "la mort d'Arthur"[[/note]]; Arthur"; it was originally only the title of the 8th and last "book" of Malory's narrative, which ''he'' might have named ''The Hoole Booke of Kyng Arthur & of His Noble Knyghtes of the Rounde Table''[[labelnote:*]]''The Whole Book of King Arthur & of His Noble Knights of the Round Table''.[[/labelnote]]. It was [[ExecutiveMeddling Caxton that changed the title]] to the one that was afterwards almost universally used, presumably because it was shorter.
6th Nov '16 9:05:36 PM Xtifr
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Sir Thomas Malory (c. 1405--1471; his name is also spelt Mallory and a handful of other variants) was an English writer. His version of the KingArthur legends, ''Le Morte d'Arthur'', is [[InkStainAdaptation treated as the definitive version]] in popular culture.

to:

Sir Thomas Malory (c. 1405--1471; his name is also spelt Mallory and a handful of other variants) was an English writer. His version of the KingArthur legends, ''Le Morte d'Arthur'', is [[InkStainAdaptation [[AudienceColoringAdaptation treated as the definitive version]] in popular culture.
5th Nov '16 9:27:43 AM dlchen145
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* {{Badass}}: Actually, a WorldOfBadass: Almost every named knight in the legend kicks ass, but those who are worthy of being mentioned include Sir Lancelot, Sir Tristram, Sir Galahad, Sir Breunor le Noire (or La Cote Male Tale), Balin, Sir Gareth, Sir Gawain, Sir Perceval and King Arthur himself.
25th Sep '16 10:29:38 AM SorPepita
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This is due in part to the fact that the book was one of the first to be printed in Britain (by William Caxton in 1485,) at what is believed to be about fourteen years after Malory's death. Also, it was composed in the later half of the 15th century, as TheLateMiddleAges were coming to an end -- making it the final major medieval Arthurian work (in English) as well as one of the first major all-prose works written in the English language.

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This is due in part to the fact that the book was one of the first to be printed in Britain (by William Caxton in 1485,) 1485), at what is believed to be about fourteen years after Malory's death. Also, it was composed in the later half of the 15th century, as TheLateMiddleAges were coming to an end -- making it the final major medieval Arthurian work (in English) as well as one of the first major all-prose works written in the English language.
14th Sep '16 8:16:44 AM MrDeath
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* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters: As one would expect. The register of knights who attempt to heal Sir Urry exemplify this. In this troper's edition, it's three pages of names.

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* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters: As one would expect. The register of knights who attempt to heal Sir Urry exemplify this. In this troper's edition, some editions, it's three pages of names.
14th Sep '16 6:57:12 AM narm00
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* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters: As one would expect. The register of knights who attempt to heal Sir Urry exemplify this. In this tropers edition, it's three pages of names.

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* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters: As one would expect. The register of knights who attempt to heal Sir Urry exemplify this. In this tropers troper's edition, it's three pages of names.



* TheRival: Sir Palamedes for Sir Tristram.



* TheRival: Sir Palamedes for Sir Tristram.



* TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth: Sir Galahad, Sir Perceval and his sister.



* TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth: Sir Galahad, Sir Perceval and his sister.
11th Sep '16 5:08:13 AM LordGro
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** The Siege Perilous is the only unlabelled seat Merlin places at the Round Table, and incinerates anyone who sits in it except "He who shall surpass all other Knights", and only this knight will be able to find the HolyGrail. The knight who eventually occupies the seat is Sir Galahad.* * OutlivingOnesOffspring: Lancelot and Gawain. Both are almost totally angst-free, though.

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** The Siege Perilous is the only unlabelled seat Merlin places at the Round Table, and incinerates anyone who sits in it except "He who shall surpass all other Knights", and only this knight will be able to find the HolyGrail. The knight who eventually occupies the seat is Sir Galahad.* Galahad.
* OutlivingOnesOffspring: Lancelot and Gawain. Both are almost totally angst-free, though.
11th Sep '16 5:07:29 AM LordGro
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* OnlyTheChosenMayWield: The Sword in the Stone and the Holy Grail are the most famous examples. There are many instances of swords that can only be drawn/held by the Chosen.
* OutlivingOnesOffspring: Lancelot and Gawain. Both are almost totally angst-free, though.

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* OnlyTheChosenMayWield: The Sword in the Stone and the Holy Grail are the most famous examples. There are many instances of swords that can only be drawn/held by the Chosen.
** After the death of Uther Pendragon the Britons cannot agree on who should be the next king, and turn to Merlin for advice. Merlin shows them a sword lodged in an anvil placed in a churchyard at Westminster and prophecies that only the true king of Britain will be able to pull the blade out. When Arthur has grown, his kingship is revealed when he succeeds in pulling the sword out.
** The Siege Perilous is the only unlabelled seat Merlin places at the Round Table, and incinerates anyone who sits in it except "He who shall surpass all other Knights", and only this knight will be able to find the HolyGrail. The knight who eventually occupies the seat is Sir Galahad.*
* OutlivingOnesOffspring: Lancelot and Gawain. Both are almost totally angst-free, though.
2nd Jul '16 3:54:26 AM Morgenthaler
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* IncestIsRelative:
** SurpriseIncest: Sir Mordred is King Arthur's son, from his sister Lady Morgawse, although back then Arthur didn't know they were blood relatives. Later, when Mordred grew up, he was made knight and served as member of the Round Table and Arthur's heir... and they were all fine with that!
** VillainousIncest: When Mordred tried to take over the kingdom for himself, he tried to take Queen Guinevere as his wife, even after he was calling her "mother" for quite a while. She ran away before he could get her.


Added DiffLines:

* SurpriseIncest: Sir Mordred is King Arthur's son, from his sister Lady Morgawse, although back then Arthur didn't know they were blood relatives. Later, when Mordred grew up, he was made knight and served as member of the Round Table and Arthur's heir... and they were all fine with that!


Added DiffLines:

* VillainousIncest: When Mordred tried to take over the kingdom for himself, he tried to take Queen Guinevere as his wife, even after he was calling her "mother" for quite a while. She ran away before he could get her.
2nd Jul '16 3:53:22 AM Morgenthaler
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* TheObiWan: Who else? Myth/{{Merlin}}
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.LeMorteDArthur