History Literature / JustSoStories

23rd Jul '15 9:17:43 AM DivineDeath
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* JerkWithAHeartOfGold: The Bi-Colored-Python-Rock-Snake has as much patience for the Elephant's Child as everyone else and spanks him for his questions. However, the snake also saves him from the Crocodile, and gives him advice on how his new trunk could be useful, up to and including getting back at everyone who ever spanked him.
8th Oct '14 2:37:07 AM Roo
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* CatsAreMean: Seems to be Kipling's attitude in ''The Cat Who Walked By Himself,'' though the Cat doesn't come across as particularly mean, just aloof and unwilling to be anyone's servant. This doesn't stop Kipling from ending the story with a poem about how dogs are so much better than cats because dogs are loyal and do what they're told while cats "only pretend" to love you since they aren't obedient and don't stay by your side 24/7.



* DisproportionateRetribution: In ''The Cat That Walked by Himself'', the Cat agrees to the terms of Man and Dog, but they still vow that they and their descendants will torment the Cat for always and always just because he spoke out of turn.

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* DisproportionateRetribution: In ''The Cat That Walked by Himself'', the Cat agrees to the terms of Man and Dog, but they still vow that they and their descendants will torment the Cat for always and always just because he spoke out of turn. Earlier on in the story, the Dog immediately renounces his friendship with the Cat just because the Cat doesn't want to come with him to the cave.
20th Mar '14 2:31:15 AM Menshevik
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* LamarckWasRight: All of the origin stories strongly resemble Lamarckian evolution, but then so do many of the folk tales which inspired Kipling. Most of the stories can be summed up as, "at some point in history a creature did something that caused it to change, and this is why nowadays all creatures of this type have this same trait". One exception is ''How the Camel Got His Hump'', where the hump is given by a djinn as a punishment for being lazy and missing three days of work at the start of Creation.

to:

* LamarckWasRight: All of the origin stories strongly resemble Lamarckian evolution, but then so do many of the folk tales which inspired Kipling. Most of the stories can be summed up as, "at some point in history a creature did something that caused it to change, and this is why nowadays all creatures of this type have this same trait". One exception is ''How the Camel Got His Hump'', where the hump is given by a djinn as a punishment for being lazy and missing three days of work at the start of Creation.Creation, another is ''The Crab that Played with the Sea'', where Pau Amma gets the scissors as a gift from the little girl-daughter.



** "How the Leopard Got His Spots" is inspired by a quotation from [[Literature/TheBible The Book of Jeremiah]] (13:23). Kipling lampshades it:

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** "How ''How the Leopard Got His Spots" Spots'' is inspired by a quotation verse from [[Literature/TheBible The Book of Jeremiah]] (13:23). Kipling lampshades it:
20th Mar '14 2:23:45 AM Menshevik
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--> "Oh, now and then you will hear grown-ups say, 'Can the Ethiopian change his skin, or the Leopard his spots?' I don't think even grown-ups would "

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--> "Oh, now and then you will hear grown-ups say, 'Can the Ethiopian change his skin, or the Leopard his spots?' I don't think even grown-ups would "keep on saying such a silly thing if the Leopard and the Ethiopian hadn't done it once - do you?"
20th Mar '14 2:17:04 AM Menshevik
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** "How the Leopard Got His Spots" is inspired by a quotation from [[Literature/TheBible The Book of Jeremiah]]:
--> "Can the Ethiopian change his skin, or the leopard his spots?"

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** "How the Leopard Got His Spots" is inspired by a quotation from [[Literature/TheBible The Book of Jeremiah]]:
Jeremiah]] (13:23). Kipling lampshades it:
--> "Can "Oh, now and then you will hear grown-ups say, 'Can the Ethiopian change his skin, or the leopard Leopard his spots?"spots?' I don't think even grown-ups would "
20th Mar '14 2:11:39 AM Menshevik
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* CorporalPunishment: The way that the Elephant Child's "'satiable curiosity" is handled.

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* CorporalPunishment: The way that the Elephant Child's "'satiable curiosity" curtiosity" (sic!) is handled.
20th Mar '14 2:09:14 AM Menshevik
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** Also Tegumai and Teshumai and, by all appearances, the Man and the Woman in ''The Cat That Walked By Himself'', although in both cases the wife seems to be the dominating partner.


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** Also Tegumai and the Man from ''The Cat That Walked By Himself''.
20th Mar '14 1:57:28 AM Menshevik
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* FantasticNamingConvention: In the two Neolithic tales the three names given all conform to the same pattern: A word consisting of three syllables, [[AlliterativeFamily beginning with "T-"]] and ending with "-mai" and a polysyllabic second word, all [[MeaningfulName descriptive of the bearer's character]]:

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* FantasticNamingConvention: In the two three Neolithic tales the three names given all conform to the same pattern: A word consisting of three syllables, [[AlliterativeFamily beginning with "T-"]] and ending with "-mai" and a polysyllabic second word, all [[MeaningfulName descriptive of the bearer's character]]:



* ShoutOut: In the explanations to the illustrations, the name of the Parsee in ''How the Rhinocerus Got His Skin'' is given as Pestonjee Bomonjee. That was the name on an artist who had been one of Kipling's father's students.

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* ShoutOut: Since most of the stories were originally made up for Kipling's children, there are a number of these. In particular Taffy is a portrait of Josephine ("Effie") and the poem ''Merrow Down'', while on the surface about Taffy and her father, mourns Effie's death by pneumonia at age six. Kipling's surviving daughter Elsie (who used to be nicknamed "Elsie Why") said that ''The Elephant's Child'' was "her" story. Many scholars see ''The Cat That Walked By Himself'' as a satirical portrait of the the early days of Rudyard Kipling's marriage, with the Woman standing in for Carrie Kipling and either the Man or the Cat serving as an AuthorAvatar.
**
In the explanations to the illustrations, the name of the Parsee in ''How the Rhinocerus Got His Skin'' is given as Pestonjee Bomonjee. That was the name on an artist who had been one of Kipling's father's students.
20th Mar '14 1:33:58 AM Menshevik
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* LamarckWasRight: All of the origin stories are heavily inspired by Lamarckian evolution. Most of the stories can be summed up as, "at some point in history a creature did something that caused it to change, and this is why nowadays all creatures of this type have this same trait". One exception is ''How the Camel Got His Hump'', where the hump is given by a djinn as a sort of punishment for being lazy and missing three days of work at the start of Creation.

to:

* LamarckWasRight: All of the origin stories are heavily inspired by strongly resemble Lamarckian evolution.evolution, but then so do many of the folk tales which inspired Kipling. Most of the stories can be summed up as, "at some point in history a creature did something that caused it to change, and this is why nowadays all creatures of this type have this same trait". One exception is ''How the Camel Got His Hump'', where the hump is given by a djinn as a sort of punishment for being lazy and missing three days of work at the start of Creation.
20th Mar '14 1:30:56 AM Menshevik
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* FantasticNamingConvention: In the two Neolithic tales the three names given all conform to the same pattern: A word consisting of three syllables, [[AlliterativeFamily beginning with "T-"]] and ending with "-mai" and a polysyllabic second word, all [[MeaningfulName descriptive of the bearer's character]]:
-->"His name was Tegumai Bopsulai, and that means, 'Man-who-does-not-put-his-foot-forward-in-a-hurry'; but we, O Best Beloved, will call him Tegumai, for short. And his wife's name was Teshumai Tewindrow, and that means, 'Lady-who-asks-a-very-many-questions'; but we, O Best Beloved, will call her Teshumai, for short. And his little girl-daughter's name was Taffimai Metallumai, and that means 'Small-person-whithout-any-manners-who-ought-to-be-spanked'; but I'm going to call her Taffy."
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