History Literature / JourneyToTheWest

18th Jun '17 5:31:52 PM Wuz
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''Journey to the West'' (Traditional: 西遊記; Simplified: 西游记; Pinyin Xī Yóu Jì; Pronounced roughly ''shee-yo-jee'') is one of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Great_Classical_Novels the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature]] alongside ''Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms'', ''Literature/WaterMargin'', and ''Literature/DreamOfTheRedChamber'', and first published in the 1590s, although it is plainly based on much older folk-legends. It is InspiredBy the pilgrimage undertaken by the Tang dynasty [[UsefulNotes/{{China}} Chinese]] Buddhist monk Xuanzang, who nearly a thousand years earlier travelled to UsefulNotes/{{India}} to study UsefulNotes/{{Buddhism}} at its source and obtain accurate copies of Buddhist texts known in China only through inaccurate nth-generation copies.

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''Journey to the West'' (Traditional: 西遊記; Simplified: 西游记; Pinyin Xī Pinyin: ''Xī Yóu Jì; Jì''; Pronounced roughly ''shee-yo-jee'') is one of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Great_Classical_Novels the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature]] alongside ''Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms'', ''Literature/WaterMargin'', and ''Literature/DreamOfTheRedChamber'', and first published in the 1590s, although it is plainly based on much older folk-legends. It is InspiredBy the pilgrimage undertaken by the Tang dynasty [[UsefulNotes/{{China}} Chinese]] Buddhist monk Xuanzang, who nearly a thousand years earlier travelled to UsefulNotes/{{India}} to study UsefulNotes/{{Buddhism}} at its source and obtain accurate copies of Buddhist texts known in China only through inaccurate nth-generation copies.
18th Jun '17 5:31:36 PM Wuz
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''Journey to the West'' (西游记 ''Xīyóujì'' pronounced roughly ''shee-yo-jee'') is one of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Great_Classical_Novels the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature]] alongside ''Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms'', ''Literature/WaterMargin'', and ''Literature/DreamOfTheRedChamber'', and first published in the 1590s, although it is plainly based on much older folk-legends. It is InspiredBy the pilgrimage undertaken by the Tang dynasty [[UsefulNotes/{{China}} Chinese]] Buddhist monk Xuanzang, who nearly a thousand years earlier travelled to UsefulNotes/{{India}} to study UsefulNotes/{{Buddhism}} at its source and obtain accurate copies of Buddhist texts known in China only through inaccurate nth-generation copies.

to:

''Journey to the West'' (西游记 ''Xīyóujì'' pronounced (Traditional: 西遊記; Simplified: 西游记; Pinyin Xī Yóu Jì; Pronounced roughly ''shee-yo-jee'') is one of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Great_Classical_Novels the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature]] alongside ''Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms'', ''Literature/WaterMargin'', and ''Literature/DreamOfTheRedChamber'', and first published in the 1590s, although it is plainly based on much older folk-legends. It is InspiredBy the pilgrimage undertaken by the Tang dynasty [[UsefulNotes/{{China}} Chinese]] Buddhist monk Xuanzang, who nearly a thousand years earlier travelled to UsefulNotes/{{India}} to study UsefulNotes/{{Buddhism}} at its source and obtain accurate copies of Buddhist texts known in China only through inaccurate nth-generation copies.
18th Jun '17 5:29:32 PM Wuz
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''Journey to the West'' (西游记 ''Xīyóujì'' pronounced roughly ''shee-yo-jee'') is one of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Great_Classical_Novels the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature]], and first published in the 1590s, although it is plainly based on much older folk-legends. It is InspiredBy the pilgrimage undertaken by the Tang dynasty [[UsefulNotes/{{China}} Chinese]] Buddhist monk Xuanzang, who nearly a thousand years earlier travelled to UsefulNotes/{{India}} to study UsefulNotes/{{Buddhism}} at its source and obtain accurate copies of Buddhist texts known in China only through inaccurate nth-generation copies.

to:

''Journey to the West'' (西游记 ''Xīyóujì'' pronounced roughly ''shee-yo-jee'') is one of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Great_Classical_Novels the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature]], literature]] alongside ''Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms'', ''Literature/WaterMargin'', and ''Literature/DreamOfTheRedChamber'', and first published in the 1590s, although it is plainly based on much older folk-legends. It is InspiredBy the pilgrimage undertaken by the Tang dynasty [[UsefulNotes/{{China}} Chinese]] Buddhist monk Xuanzang, who nearly a thousand years earlier travelled to UsefulNotes/{{India}} to study UsefulNotes/{{Buddhism}} at its source and obtain accurate copies of Buddhist texts known in China only through inaccurate nth-generation copies.
15th May '17 6:54:40 PM Wuz
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''Journey to the West'' has been adapted to television many times - especially in Japan, where the story is called ''Saiyuki'' and the characters are Genjo Sanzo, Cho Hakkai, Sha Gojo, and Son Goku. Many anime series have at least one ShoutOut, and some go for outright plunder (from ''[[Manga/{{Saiyuki}} Gensomaden Saiyuki]]'' to, of all things, ''Manga/DragonBall'' - yes, ''that'' Son Goku was inspired directly by ''this'' Son Goku). One Japanese live-action adaption of the 1970s, and its thoroughly gender-bent cast (the role of Xuanzang/Tripitaka/Genjo Sanzo is traditionally played by a woman), is still fondly remembered simply as ''Series/{{Monkey}}'' in English-speaking countries from the irreverent (almost GagDub) [[Creator/TheBBC BBC]] translated version, with its annoyingly catchy disco theme-song [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-zOFAD6e9Bk "Monkey Magic"]] (directly taken from the Japanese broadcast where it was also sung in SurprisinglyGoodEnglish). The most recent TV adaptation as of this writing is 2011's ''Series/{{Journey to the West|2011}}''.

to:

''Journey to the West'' has been adapted to television many times - especially in Japan, where the story is called ''Saiyuki'' and the characters are Genjo Sanzo, Cho Hakkai, Sha Gojo, and Son Goku.Goku ([[AlternateCharacterReading All just the on'yomi Japanese reading of the Chinese character names]]). Many anime series have at least one ShoutOut, and some go for outright plunder (from ''[[Manga/{{Saiyuki}} Gensomaden Saiyuki]]'' to, of all things, ''Manga/DragonBall'' - yes, ''that'' Son Goku was inspired directly by ''this'' Son Goku). One Japanese live-action adaption of the 1970s, and its thoroughly gender-bent cast (the role of Xuanzang/Tripitaka/Genjo Sanzo is traditionally played by a woman), is still fondly remembered simply as ''Series/{{Monkey}}'' in English-speaking countries from the irreverent (almost GagDub) [[Creator/TheBBC BBC]] translated version, with its annoyingly catchy disco theme-song [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-zOFAD6e9Bk "Monkey Magic"]] (directly taken from the Japanese broadcast where it was also sung in SurprisinglyGoodEnglish). The most recent TV adaptation as of this writing is 2011's ''Series/{{Journey to the West|2011}}''.
24th Apr '17 3:05:06 PM Ciara25
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* SummonBiggerFish: As powerful as Sun Wukong and his companions are, occasionally they encounter threats beyond their ability to deal with. Often, they have to get help from Guan Yin, Buddha, or other gods to help subdue the demons they are fighting. Oddly enough, despite the fact that their horse is a transformed dragon, not ''once'' does he change shape to try and help out.

to:

* SummonBiggerFish: As powerful as Sun Wukong and his companions are, occasionally they encounter threats beyond their ability to deal with. Often, they have to get help from Guan Yin, Buddha, or other gods to help subdue the demons they are fighting. Oddly enough, despite Or, very occasionally, the fact horse, when the author actually remembers that their said horse is ''is a transformed dragon, not ''once'' does he change shape to try and help out.dragon.''
24th Apr '17 3:03:17 PM Ciara25
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* SummonBiggerFish: As powerful as Sun Wukong and his companions are, occasionally they encounter threats beyond their ability to deal with. Often, they have to get help from Guan Yin, Buddha, or other gods to help subdue the demons they are fighting. Oddly enough, despite the fact that their horse is a transformed dragon, not ''once'' does he transform to help out.

to:

* SummonBiggerFish: As powerful as Sun Wukong and his companions are, occasionally they encounter threats beyond their ability to deal with. Often, they have to get help from Guan Yin, Buddha, or other gods to help subdue the demons they are fighting. Oddly enough, despite the fact that their horse is a transformed dragon, not ''once'' does he transform change shape to try and help out.
24th Apr '17 3:01:11 PM Ciara25
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* SummonBiggerFish: As powerful as Sun Wukong and his companions are occassionally they encounter threats beyond their ability to deal with. Often, they have to get help from Guan Yin, Buddha, or other gods to help subdue the demons they are fighting.

to:

* SummonBiggerFish: As powerful as Sun Wukong and his companions are occassionally are, occasionally they encounter threats beyond their ability to deal with. Often, they have to get help from Guan Yin, Buddha, or other gods to help subdue the demons they are fighting. Oddly enough, despite the fact that their horse is a transformed dragon, not ''once'' does he transform to help out.
12th Apr '17 3:11:10 AM Arcorann
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** Believe it or not, Buddha himself, in ''Literature/JourneyToTheWest'' at least. It may not seem so obvious at first, but it becomes pretty clear that he is one when you think about it. Before he punished Wukong, Buddha made a bet with him, which went like this; ''Sun Wukong must first jump onto Buddha's palm, He must then leave Buddha's palm and fly to the edge of the universe, if Sun Wukong accomplishes this, he shall be the new ruler of Heaven.'' So the [[SunWukong Monkey King]] puts his all into it, and after reaching what he believes to be the edge of the universe, marked by five giant pillars, then flys back to Buddha in order to claim Heaven, ONLY TO BE TOLD that he never left Buddha's hand, due to the fact that the ''''ENTIRE UNIVERSE'''' rest in the palm of Buddha's hand, and then was sealed under a Mountain for 500 years and only given Iron Balls to eat and {{Mercury}} to drink as part of his aforementioned punishment. Sound fair so far? Well while Wukong was a those giant pillars, he signed his name on one of them to prove he'd been there, then went around to the other side of it and peed on it, when he goes back to Buddha it's revealed that the "pillars" were in fact Buddha's fingers, '''''This means that Sun Wukong successfully left Buddha's palm and went to the edge of the universe, a palm CAN"T exist on both sides of the fingers.''''' Other versions have Buddha using his powers to cloud Wukong's mind to stop him from going anywhere, '''which is pretty much the same thing as slipping someone a mickey to stop them from completing their part of the bet. i.e. cheating.''' Either way Buddha owes {{SunWukong}} Heaven. Some versions do avoid this by have Wukong actually going to the "pillars", but just peeing on a different pillar.
*** Another case of Buddha being a jerkass was the time he had his men fly Tripitaka and Co. back to China, but before they were home, Buddha asked how many disasters they had suffered on their way to him, after finding out it was 80 Buddha decided to have them go through another one just because 9 was Buddism's lucky/holy number and 9x9 is 81 [[note]] They didn't even NEED to experience another disaster, Buddha just wanted them to[[/note]], so he orders his men to drop them without consulting Tripitaka and Co. Keep in mind Buddha wasn't with them, he asked a Divine record keeper for the number.


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** While Xuanzang and co. were being flown back to China by the Eight Vajrapanis, Guanyin asked how many ordeals they had suffered on their way to him. After finding out it was 80, she decided to have them go through another one because they were one short of the number required to reach the truth, and as soon as the Vajrapanis hear of the command they instantly drop the group where they are.
26th Mar '17 3:49:34 AM bwburke94
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''Journey to the West'' has been adapted to television many times - especially in Japan, where the story is called ''Saiyuki'' and the characters are Genjo Sanzo, Cho Hakkai, Sha Gojo, and Son Goku. Many anime series have at least one ShoutOut, and some go for outright plunder (from ''[[Manga/{{Saiyuki}} Gensomaden Saiyuki]]'' to, of all things, ''Manga/DragonBall'' - yes, ''that'' Son Goku was inspired directly by ''this'' Son Goku, as they even have the same exact name in terms of character usage). One Japanese live-action adaption of the 1970s, and its thoroughly gender-bent cast (the role of Xuanzang/Tripitaka/Genjo Sanzo is traditionally played by a woman), is still fondly remembered simply as ''Series/{{Monkey}}'' in English-speaking countries from the irreverent (almost GagDub) [[Creator/TheBBC BBC]] translated version, with its annoyingly catchy disco theme-song [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-zOFAD6e9Bk "Monkey Magic"]] (directly taken from the Japanese broadcast where it was also sung in SurprisinglyGoodEnglish). The most recent TV adaptation is ''Series/{{Journey to the West|2011}}'' of 2011.

to:

''Journey to the West'' has been adapted to television many times - especially in Japan, where the story is called ''Saiyuki'' and the characters are Genjo Sanzo, Cho Hakkai, Sha Gojo, and Son Goku. Many anime series have at least one ShoutOut, and some go for outright plunder (from ''[[Manga/{{Saiyuki}} Gensomaden Saiyuki]]'' to, of all things, ''Manga/DragonBall'' - yes, ''that'' Son Goku was inspired directly by ''this'' Son Goku, as they even have the same exact name in terms of character usage).Goku). One Japanese live-action adaption of the 1970s, and its thoroughly gender-bent cast (the role of Xuanzang/Tripitaka/Genjo Sanzo is traditionally played by a woman), is still fondly remembered simply as ''Series/{{Monkey}}'' in English-speaking countries from the irreverent (almost GagDub) [[Creator/TheBBC BBC]] translated version, with its annoyingly catchy disco theme-song [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-zOFAD6e9Bk "Monkey Magic"]] (directly taken from the Japanese broadcast where it was also sung in SurprisinglyGoodEnglish). The most recent TV adaptation as of this writing is 2011's ''Series/{{Journey to the West|2011}}'' of 2011.
West|2011}}''.



The team responsible for Music/{{Gorillaz}}, Damon Albarn (he of Music/{{Blur}}) and Jamie Hewlett (of ''ComicBook/TankGirl'' fame), adapted the story into an opera in 2007. They also did a two-minute animated version for the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, which was used as a title sequence for the BBC television coverage of the event.

to:

The team responsible for Music/{{Gorillaz}}, Damon Albarn (he of (of Music/{{Blur}}) and Jamie Hewlett (of ''ComicBook/TankGirl'' fame), adapted the story into an opera in 2007. They also did a two-minute animated version for the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, which was used as a title sequence for the BBC television coverage of the event.
17th Mar '17 4:02:02 PM Willbyr
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%% Image from the Chinese video game "Journey to the West" http://xyhj.linekong.com
[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/journey_to_the_west_-_game_1665.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:Yu Lung, Xuanzang, Zhu Bajie, Sun Wukong, and Sha Wujing.]]

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%% Image from the Chinese video game "Journey to the West" http://xyhj.linekong.com
[[quoteright:350:http://static.
selected per Image Pickin' thread: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=1488330567017031400
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[[quoteright:275:http://static.
tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/journey_to_the_west_-_game_1665.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:Yu Lung, Xuanzang, Zhu Bajie, Sun Wukong, and Sha Wujing.]]
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