History Literature / JourneyToTheWest

17th Aug '16 6:18:12 AM ChrisX
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Sun Wukong deserves a paragraph to himself. Warrior, magician, and trickster, the Handsome Monkey King (by acclamation of his subjects) and Great Sage Equal of Heaven (self-proclaimed) gets seven chapters devoted to his rise and fall before the novel's nominal hero first appears, and continues to steal the limelight throughout with practiced ease. Every reader has a favourite story -- the one about his bet with the Buddha is particularly popular -- but alas, this page is too small to do them all justice.

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Sun Wukong deserves a paragraph to himself. Warrior, magician, and trickster, the Handsome Monkey King (by acclamation of his subjects) and Great Sage Equal of Heaven (self-proclaimed) gets seven chapters devoted to his rise and fall before the novel's nominal hero first appears, and continues to steal the limelight throughout with practiced ease. Every reader has a favourite story -- the one about his bet with the Buddha is particularly popular -- but alas, this page is too small to do them all justice. \n [[FountainOfExpies He also has]] [[MonkeyKingLite tons and tons of imitators.]]
9th Aug '16 1:44:56 PM Morgenthaler
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''Journey to the West'' (西游记 ''Xīyóujì'' pronounced roughly ''shee-yo-jee'') is one of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Great_Classical_Novels the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature]], and first published in the 1590s, although it is plainly based on much older folk-legends. It is InspiredBy the pilgrimage undertaken by the Tang dynasty [[{{China}} Chinese]] Buddhist monk Xuanzang, who nearly a thousand years earlier travelled to {{India}} to study {{Buddhism}} at its source and obtain accurate copies of Buddhist texts known in China only through inaccurate nth-generation copies.

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''Journey to the West'' (西游记 ''Xīyóujì'' pronounced roughly ''shee-yo-jee'') is one of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Great_Classical_Novels the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature]], and first published in the 1590s, although it is plainly based on much older folk-legends. It is InspiredBy the pilgrimage undertaken by the Tang dynasty [[{{China}} [[UsefulNotes/{{China}} Chinese]] Buddhist monk Xuanzang, who nearly a thousand years earlier travelled to {{India}} UsefulNotes/{{India}} to study {{Buddhism}} UsefulNotes/{{Buddhism}} at its source and obtain accurate copies of Buddhist texts known in China only through inaccurate nth-generation copies.
21st Jul '16 6:43:06 PM PaulA
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Added DiffLines:

* EnlightenmentSuperpower: Many of Sun Wukong's powers, including the shapeshifting, the ability to summon duplicates of himself, and the ability to leap large distances in a single bound, were gained as side-effects of studying the secrets of the universe under the sage Subhuti. Subhuti eventually asked him to leave when he realized he was more interested in the superpowers than the enlightenment.
20th Jul '16 6:08:17 AM Morgenthaler
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* DangerouslyGenreSavvy:
** The Garuda King in the Three Monsters arc. [[spoiler:By virtue of being Buddha's pet and the brother of Buddha's foster mother, he knows everything there is to know about Sun Wukong's tricks and how to counter them. He was also the demon that came the closest to eating Xuanzang. Wukong only subdued him by calling in the Buddha himself to control Garuda.]]
** Wukong exhibits this as well at times, knowing when something isn't right and trying to convince the others to move on, but with Zhu Bajie constantly playing catch with the IdiotBall with Xuanzang during those chapters it never ends well.
1st Mar '16 8:19:30 PM Gairyuki
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Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationSpeciesChange: Probably due to some form of LostInTranslation. Sha Wujing was originally a demon dwelling in a river of sand. When the story was brought over to Japan, it seems the part about the river being sand got left out, and so Sha Wujing, now Sha Gojyo, was turned into their river-dwelling man-eating (ish) monster, the kappa, hence why all Japanese references to Sha Gojyo at least give him kappa traits.
17th Feb '16 8:08:45 PM ZeroWizard
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In the novel, Xuanzang (also called Tripitaka, a Chinese-Sanskrit [[BilingualBonus bilingual pun]] that can't be explained concisely in English), at the request of the bodhisattva Guan Yin, is accompanied by three supernatural beings who have been assigned to guide and protect him as penance for past misdeeds. Zhu Bajie, pig-like in appearance and a greedy hog in behaviour, and Sha Wujing, a river monster whose fierce appearance belies his thoughtful nature, are former heavenly dignitaries exiled to their current existences. The third companion is Sun Wukong.

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In the novel, Xuanzang (also called Tripitaka, a Chinese-Sanskrit [[BilingualBonus bilingual pun]] that can't be explained concisely in English), at the request of the bodhisattva Guan Yin, is accompanied by three supernatural beings who have been assigned to guide and protect him as penance for past misdeeds. Zhu Bajie, pig-like in appearance and a greedy hog in behaviour, behavior, and Sha Wujing, a river monster whose fierce appearance belies his thoughtful nature, are former heavenly dignitaries exiled to their current existences. The third companion is Sun Wukong.
16th Feb '16 5:53:08 PM PaulA
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* ChronicHeroSyndrome: The Journey would not have taken nearly so long if Xuanzang didn't insist on helping everyone they met along the way. Though as pointed out in CharacterDevelopment this is part of the point of the journey (More than part of, as we find out a certain number of trials is demanded by the Buddha as part of their quest to reach enlightenment, and he even adds an extra one after they've finally gotten the scriptures and are on their way back because he realized they're still one short).

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* ChronicHeroSyndrome: The Journey would not have taken nearly so long if Xuanzang didn't insist on helping everyone they met along the way. Though as pointed out in CharacterDevelopment However, this is part of the point of the journey (More than part of, as journey; we find out a certain number of trials is demanded by the Buddha as part of their quest to reach enlightenment, and he even adds an extra one after they've finally gotten the scriptures and are on their way back because he realized they're still one short).short.
16th Feb '16 8:33:22 AM starofjusticev21
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* ChronicHeroSyndrome: The Journey would not have taken nearly so long if Xuanzang didn't insist on helping everyone they met along the way. Though as pointed out in CharacterDevelopment this is part of the point of the journey (More than part of, as we find out a certain number of trials is demanded by the Buddha as part of their quest, and he even adds an extra one when they've gotten the scriptures and are on their way back because they're still one short).

to:

* ChronicHeroSyndrome: The Journey would not have taken nearly so long if Xuanzang didn't insist on helping everyone they met along the way. Though as pointed out in CharacterDevelopment this is part of the point of the journey (More than part of, as we find out a certain number of trials is demanded by the Buddha as part of their quest, quest to reach enlightenment, and he even adds an extra one when after they've finally gotten the scriptures and are on their way back because he realized they're still one short).
16th Feb '16 8:29:10 AM starofjusticev21
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* ChronicHeroSyndrome: The Journey would not have taken nearly so long if Xuanzang didn't insist on helping everyone they met along the way. Though as pointed out in CharacterDevelopment this is part of the point of the journey.

to:

* ChronicHeroSyndrome: The Journey would not have taken nearly so long if Xuanzang didn't insist on helping everyone they met along the way. Though as pointed out in CharacterDevelopment this is part of the point of the journey.journey (More than part of, as we find out a certain number of trials is demanded by the Buddha as part of their quest, and he even adds an extra one when they've gotten the scriptures and are on their way back because they're still one short).
14th Feb '16 4:40:24 AM Ryulong
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''Journey to the West'' has been adapted to television many times - especially in Japan, where the story is called ''Saiyuki'' and the characters are Genjo Sanzo, Cho Hakkai, Sha Gojo, and Son Goku. Many anime series have at least one ShoutOut, and some go for outright plunder (from ''[[Manga/{{Saiyuki}} Gensomaden Saiyuki]]'' to, of all things, ''Manga/DragonBall'' - yes, ''that'' Son Goku was inspired directly by ''this'' Son Goku, as they even have the same exact name in terms of character usage). One Japanese live-action adaption of the 1970s, and its thoroughly gender-bent cast (the role of Xuanzang/Tripitaka/Genjo Sanzo is traditionally played by a woman), is still fondly remembered simply as ''Series/{{Monkey}}'' in English-speaking countries from the irreverent (almost GagDub) [[Creator/TheBBC BBC]] translated version, with its annoyingly catchy disco theme-song [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5iUMWy4hqAg "Monkey Magic"]] (directly taken from the Japanese broadcast where it was also sung in SurprisinglyGoodEnglish). The most recent TV adaptation is ''Series/{{Journey to the West|2011}}'' of 2011.

to:

''Journey to the West'' has been adapted to television many times - especially in Japan, where the story is called ''Saiyuki'' and the characters are Genjo Sanzo, Cho Hakkai, Sha Gojo, and Son Goku. Many anime series have at least one ShoutOut, and some go for outright plunder (from ''[[Manga/{{Saiyuki}} Gensomaden Saiyuki]]'' to, of all things, ''Manga/DragonBall'' - yes, ''that'' Son Goku was inspired directly by ''this'' Son Goku, as they even have the same exact name in terms of character usage). One Japanese live-action adaption of the 1970s, and its thoroughly gender-bent cast (the role of Xuanzang/Tripitaka/Genjo Sanzo is traditionally played by a woman), is still fondly remembered simply as ''Series/{{Monkey}}'' in English-speaking countries from the irreverent (almost GagDub) [[Creator/TheBBC BBC]] translated version, with its annoyingly catchy disco theme-song [[http://www.[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5iUMWy4hqAg com/watch?v=-zOFAD6e9Bk "Monkey Magic"]] (directly taken from the Japanese broadcast where it was also sung in SurprisinglyGoodEnglish). The most recent TV adaptation is ''Series/{{Journey to the West|2011}}'' of 2011.
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