History Literature / IronDruidChronicles

24th May '16 6:01:24 PM DaleStan
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* ArsonMurderAndJaywalking: Atticus notes that the villain in "Grimoire of the Lamb" needs to die because he's messing around with really dark magic that could kill part of the Earth, and because he has a way of undoing Druidic bindings and because he punched Atticus.

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* ArsonMurderAndJaywalking: ArsonMurderAndJaywalking:
**
Atticus notes that the villain in "Grimoire of the Lamb" needs to die because he's messing around with really dark magic that could kill part of the Earth, and because he has a way of undoing Druidic bindings and because he punched Atticus.



* BerserkButton: Atticus tells Bacchus he's "a pale imitation of a better god" just to piss him off.

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* BerserkButton: BerserkButton:
**
Atticus tells Bacchus he's "a pale imitation of a better god" just to piss him off.
23rd May '16 8:33:55 PM DaleStan
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* ContrivedCoincidence: By his own admission, Atticus' Soul Catcher probably shouldn't have worked. It'd require that he die while in contact with the earth, that his body would fall in such a way that his tattoos were actually touching the ground, that his binding would actually keep his soul in place at all and a whole slew of other requirements that the odds of it saving him once were wildly improbable and unlikely to happen again.

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* ContrivedCoincidence: By his own admission, Atticus' admission in ''Hunted'', [[spoiler:Atticus' Soul Catcher probably shouldn't have worked. It'd require that he die while in contact with the earth, that his body would fall in such a way that his tattoos were actually touching the ground, that his binding would actually keep his soul in place at all and a whole slew of other requirements that the odds of it saving him once were wildly improbable and unlikely to happen again.]]



* RageAgainstTheMentor / [[RageAgainstTheHeavens Heavens]]: Granuaile gets angry at Atticus after she meets the Tuatha Dé Dannan because they're mostly assholes that don't meet her ideal of a god, and she believed that being a Druid would require her to worship them. Atticus is quick to assure her that just because he worships them doesn't mean she has to; the only extra-human entity she is beholden to is the Earth itself.

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* RageAgainstTheMentor / [[RageAgainstTheHeavens Heavens]]: Granuaile gets angry at Atticus after she meets the Tuatha Dé Dannan Danann because they're mostly assholes that don't meet her ideal of a god, and she believed that being a Druid would require her to worship them. Atticus is quick to assure her that just because he worships them doesn't mean she has to; the only extra-human entity she is beholden to is the Earth itself.
21st May '16 11:56:45 AM DaleStan
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** The Morrigan told Aenghus Og that she had promised not to take Atticus, knowing he would use his connections with Hell to summon the Christian Death, so that when Aenghus died the Morrigan wouldn't have to take him, just leave him for Death to take to Hell.

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** The Morrigan told Aenghus Og Óg that she had promised not to take Atticus, knowing he would use his connections with Hell to summon the Christian Death, so that when Aenghus died the Morrigan wouldn't have to take him, just leave him for Death to take to Hell.



* BigBad: Aenghus Og in the first book is really the only antagonist that fits the trope effectively. At least, until Loki [[spoiler: reveals that he has been faking his insanity all this time and is actually quite a schemer]].

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* BigBad: Aenghus Og Óg in the first book is really the only antagonist that fits the trope effectively. At least, until Loki [[spoiler: reveals that he has been faking his insanity all this time and is actually quite a schemer]].



* CoolOldGuy: Manannán mac Lir lets Atticus keep Fragarach because it pisses off Aenghus Og and helped Atticus get to North America long before that schmuck Columbus sailed the ocean blue.

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* CoolOldGuy: Manannán mac Lir lets Atticus keep Fragarach because it pisses off Aenghus Og Óg and helped Atticus get to North America long before that schmuck Columbus sailed the ocean blue.



** Goibniu and Manannán mac Lir of the Tuatha de Dannan.

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** Goibniu and Manannán mac Lir of the Tuatha de Dannan.Dé Danann.



** The degree to which gods are shaped and empowered by believers is kind of inconsistent. In ''Hammered'', despite apparently having no believers, Perun weather control powers rival Thor's while in Asgard of all places, who is explicitly described as being much stronger because his is still remembered thanks to the Prose and Poetic Eddas. The Morrigan matches Freya effortlessly in ''Two Ravens and One Crow'' and outright kills Vidar in ''Tricked''. In the former case, it's pretty much a case of scale. Goddess of death, even one that's largely forgotten, would still probably have more power than a goddess who is most frequently conflated with Frigg in modern minds. And in the latter, Vidar directly submitted himself to her sphere of influence by challenging her to a fight over the ownership of a weapon that belonged to the Tuatha de Dannan.

to:

** The degree to which gods are shaped and empowered by believers is kind of inconsistent. In ''Hammered'', despite apparently having no believers, Perun weather control powers rival Thor's while in Asgard of all places, who is explicitly described as being much stronger because his is still remembered thanks to the Prose and Poetic Eddas. The Morrigan matches Freya effortlessly in ''Two Ravens and One Crow'' and outright kills Vidar in ''Tricked''. In the former case, it's pretty much a case of scale. Goddess of death, even one that's largely forgotten, would still probably have more power than a goddess who is most frequently conflated with Frigg in modern minds. And in the latter, Vidar directly submitted himself to her sphere of influence by challenging her to a fight over the ownership of a weapon that belonged to the Tuatha de Dannan.Dé Danann.



* TheGrimReaper: Shows up on his pale horse and everything in the first book. He's a decidedly creepy person [[spoiler:and takes Aunghus Og to Hell when he died.]]

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* TheGrimReaper: Shows up on his pale horse and everything in the first book. He's a decidedly creepy person [[spoiler:and takes Aunghus Og Aenghus Óg to Hell when he died.]]



* {{Hellfire}}: Aunghus Og gained this through a DealWithTheDevil.

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* {{Hellfire}}: Aunghus Og Aenghus Óg gained this through a DealWithTheDevil.



* HomeFieldAdvantage: Druids are very GenreSavvy about this. Atticus has some very powerful enemies looking for him so he spent at least a century setting up his defenses. He befriended all the local nature spirits, allied himself with the local vampire lord and the local werewolf pack and put multiple layers of magical and mundane protections on his home and workplace. His ultimate home field advantage comes from an arrangement he has with Morrigan, one of his pantheon's Death Gods. As long as any battle he is in takes place under the jurisdiction of that god, Atticus cannot die in it. Unfortunately Aunghus Og was just as GenreSavvy and went to extraordinary lengths to nullify all those advantages including making sure that the final battle happened where Morrigan has no jurisdiction and could not (officially) interfere.

to:

* HomeFieldAdvantage: Druids are very GenreSavvy about this. Atticus has some very powerful enemies looking for him so he spent at least a century setting up his defenses. He befriended all the local nature spirits, allied himself with the local vampire lord and the local werewolf pack and put multiple layers of magical and mundane protections on his home and workplace. His ultimate home field advantage comes from an arrangement he has with Morrigan, one of his pantheon's Death Gods. As long as any battle he is in takes place under the jurisdiction of that god, Atticus cannot die in it. Unfortunately Aunghus Og Aenghus Óg was just as GenreSavvy and went to extraordinary lengths to nullify all those advantages including making sure that the final battle happened where Morrigan has no jurisdiction and could not (officially) interfere.



** Before that, Aenghus Og first kidnapping Oberon and Hal, then drawing power from the Earth to open a portal to Hell, which killed the surrounding land for about twenty square miles. Both HUGE no-nos in Druidic law, and a personal blow for anyone intimately connected to the Earth (as all Druids are).

to:

** Before that, Aenghus Og Óg first kidnapping Oberon and Hal, then drawing power from the Earth to open a portal to Hell, which killed the surrounding land for about twenty square miles. Both HUGE no-nos in Druidic law, and a personal blow for anyone intimately connected to the Earth (as all Druids are).



* JerkassGods: A few. Thor and Aenghus Og stand out in particular. Most believe in MightMakesRight and would [[DisproportionateRetribution murder for rudeness]] (The Morrigan for example) if the culprit isn't on their power level. Lampshaded in the "Clan Rathskeller" short story, though in that case it was actually a subversion.

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* JerkassGods: A few. Thor and Aenghus Og Óg stand out in particular. Most believe in MightMakesRight and would [[DisproportionateRetribution murder for rudeness]] (The Morrigan for example) if the culprit isn't on their power level. Lampshaded in the "Clan Rathskeller" short story, though in that case it was actually a subversion.



* KnightTemplar: The Hammers of God, a multi-religious military organization that targets Atticus because he was present when Aenghus Og opened a portal to Hell.

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* KnightTemplar: The Hammers of God, a multi-religious military organization that targets Atticus because he was present when Aenghus Og Óg opened a portal to Hell.



** Aenghus Og summoned the Christian Death for his fight with Atticus, because he knew that the Morrigan wouldn't come for him. When Atticus kills him, Death takes him to Hell instead of Tir na Nog.

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** Aenghus Og Óg summoned the Christian Death for his fight with Atticus, because he knew that the Morrigan wouldn't come for him. When Atticus kills him, Death takes him to Hell instead of Tir Tír na Nog.nÓg.



* NominalHero: Atticus fights because ItsPersonal, or because his [[MoralityPet loved ones]] are threatened, or because of mutual interests and old deals... and occasionally to deal out GaiasVengeance, but he makes no claim to being a hero. He spent two thousand years running away from a confrontation with Aenghus Og, only finally deciding to after Brighid and Flidais conspired to force his hand, and even then he might not have gone through with it if Aenghus hadn't opened up a portal to Hell.

to:

* NominalHero: Atticus fights because ItsPersonal, or because his [[MoralityPet loved ones]] are threatened, or because of mutual interests and old deals... and occasionally to deal out GaiasVengeance, but he makes no claim to being a hero. He spent two thousand years running away from a confrontation with Aenghus Og, Óg, only finally deciding to after Brighid and Flidais conspired to force his hand, and even then he might not have gone through with it if Aenghus hadn't opened up a portal to Hell.



** Atticus is a {{Druid}}, his job is being the protector of Earth. Outside of that one Aenghus Og-caused catastrophe he doesn't seem to care or at least is never shown to do anything environmentally conscious (closest he comes is relegating his apprentice to do it as training), though he does mention a number of times where's he's intervened to save an Elemental (local NatureSpirit). In the general sense, he justifies his lack of action as pointless. He's just one guy and could spend days sabotaging mining equipment and things like that, but the mining companies would just replace the equipment and continue right along and he'd have to start all over again.

to:

** Atticus is a {{Druid}}, his job is being the protector of Earth. Outside of that one Aenghus Og-caused Óg-caused catastrophe he doesn't seem to care or at least is never shown to do anything environmentally conscious (closest he comes is relegating his apprentice to do it as training), though he does mention a number of times where's he's intervened to save an Elemental (local NatureSpirit). In the general sense, he justifies his lack of action as pointless. He's just one guy and could spend days sabotaging mining equipment and things like that, but the mining companies would just replace the equipment and continue right along and he'd have to start all over again.



* RageAgainstTheMentor / [[RageAgainstTheHeavens Heavens]]: Granuaile gets angry at Atticus after she meets the Tuatha de Dannan because they're mostly assholes that don't meet her ideal of a god, and she believed that being a Druid would require her to worship them. Atticus is quick to assure her that just because he worships them doesn't mean she has to; the only extra-human entity she is beholden to is the Earth itself.

to:

* RageAgainstTheMentor / [[RageAgainstTheHeavens Heavens]]: Granuaile gets angry at Atticus after she meets the Tuatha de Dannan because they're mostly assholes that don't meet her ideal of a god, and she believed that being a Druid would require her to worship them. Atticus is quick to assure her that just because he worships them doesn't mean she has to; the only extra-human entity she is beholden to is the Earth itself.



* TricksterMentor: Atticus' old Archdruid was prone to smacking him with his staff when he wasn't paying attention or concealed something from him, and is mentioned to have thrown a pissed off rooster at Atticus. Nevertheless his tutelage allowed Atticus to survive for the last two thousand years, and it's implied that he himself may still be alive as well, as Atticus mentions never having seen him in Tir na Nog. [[spoiler: At the very end of ''Hunted'', it's revealed that he ''is'' alive because the Morrigan preserved him on a Time Island and gave Atticus its location at the beginning of said book]].

to:

* TricksterMentor: Atticus' old Archdruid was prone to smacking him with his staff when he wasn't paying attention or concealed something from him, and is mentioned to have thrown a pissed off rooster at Atticus. Nevertheless his tutelage allowed Atticus to survive for the last two thousand years, and it's implied that he himself may still be alive as well, as Atticus mentions never having seen him in Tir Tír na Nog.nÓg. [[spoiler: At the very end of ''Hunted'', it's revealed that he ''is'' alive because the Morrigan preserved him on a Time Island and gave Atticus its location at the beginning of said book]].



*** Aenghus Og is mentioned to be able to turn into a swan.

to:

*** Aenghus Og Óg is mentioned to be able to turn into a swan.



* YearOutsideHourInside: The Time Islands in Tir na Nog. People trapped in there experience time normally, but relative to the rest of the world it takes several millennia for them to so much as blink.

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* YearOutsideHourInside: The Time Islands in Tir Tír na Nog.nÓg. People trapped in there experience time normally, but relative to the rest of the world it takes several millennia for them to so much as blink.
14th May '16 6:57:57 PM DaleStan
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** Played with in ''Trapped''. Atticus traps Bacchus in an area of slow time. He's effectively trapped, but as far as he knows time is passing normally and not even a single second has passed.

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** Played with in ''Trapped''. Atticus [[spoiler:Atticus traps Bacchus in in]] an area of slow time. He's effectively trapped, but as far as he knows time is passing normally and not even a single second has passed.
13th Mar '16 4:40:31 AM sekkun
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** Granuaile gets really angry if you patronize her.

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** Granuaile gets really angry if you patronize her. Or threaten her dog. Or pollute. Or disagree with anything she says.



** Anyone caught in the effect of Fragarach, the Answerer. It forces them to speak nothing but the truth.

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** Anyone caught in the effect of Fragarach, the Answerer. It forces them to speak nothing but the truth. And to leave nothing out.
22nd Feb '16 7:01:48 PM Eagal
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Added DiffLines:

** Granuaille gets in on the action in ''Staked''. She attacks her step-father's business explicitly out of spite, rationalizing her actions as helping the Earth. She derides Atticus' tendency to resort to violence as "how men solve problems" then goes straight to her step-father's office and beats the crap out of him and several security guards. Despite acknowledging her hypocrisy in attacking him, she continues to beat him up anyway, once again trying to justify it as her striking back against a polluter.
26th Sep '15 9:17:39 PM Eagal
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** The degree to which gods are shaped and empowered by believers is kind of inconsistent. In ''Hammered'', despite apparently having no believers, Perun weather control powers rival Thor's while in Asgard of all places, who is explicitly described as being much stronger because his is still remembered thanks to the Prose and Poetic Eddas. The Morrigan matches Freya effortlessly in ''Two Ravens and One Crow'' and outright kills Vidar in ''Tricked''. In the former case, pretty much the same deal. Goddess of death beats out a goddess who is most frequently conflated with Frigg in modern minds. And in the latter, Vidar directly submitted himself to her sphere of influence by challenging her to a fight.

to:

** The degree to which gods are shaped and empowered by believers is kind of inconsistent. In ''Hammered'', despite apparently having no believers, Perun weather control powers rival Thor's while in Asgard of all places, who is explicitly described as being much stronger because his is still remembered thanks to the Prose and Poetic Eddas. The Morrigan matches Freya effortlessly in ''Two Ravens and One Crow'' and outright kills Vidar in ''Tricked''. In the former case, it's pretty much the same deal. a case of scale. Goddess of death beats out death, even one that's largely forgotten, would still probably have more power than a goddess who is most frequently conflated with Frigg in modern minds. And in the latter, Vidar directly submitted himself to her sphere of influence by challenging her to a fight.fight over the ownership of a weapon that belonged to the Tuatha de Dannan.
26th Sep '15 9:15:04 PM Eagal
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* NeverMyFault: Atticus usually tries to avoid any responsibility for his actions and only tries to fix things if strong armed. He tries to skip town instead of dealing with the Maenads and only does when pressured to do so by the local coven. He blames the whole Asgard mess on the Norns and Thor only admitting he handled things "poorly" when forced to confront Odin.

to:

* NeverMyFault: Atticus usually tries to avoid any responsibility for his actions and only tries to fix things if strong armed.strong-armed. He tries to skip town instead of dealing with the Maenads and only does when pressured to do so by the local coven. He blames the whole Asgard mess on the Norns and Thor Thor, only admitting he handled things "poorly" when forced to confront Odin. Odin.
26th Sep '15 4:22:11 PM seekquaze1
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** The degree to which gods are shaped and empowered by believers is kind of inconsistent. In ''Hammered'', despite apparently having no believers, Perun remains a viable fighter compared to the Norse, who are explicitly described as being much stronger because they're still remembered thanks to the Prose and Poetic Eddas. Though Perun never fought any of the "big name" Norse like Odin or Thor, just Skadi. Apparently, even a weakened god of thunder is more than a match for a god of skiing. Similarly, the Morrigan matches Freya effortlessly in ''Two Ravens and One Crow'' and outright kills Vidar in ''Tricked''. In the former case, pretty much the same deal. Goddess of death beats out a goddess who is most frequently conflated with Frigg in modern minds. And in the latter, Vidar directly submitted himself to her sphere of influence by challenging her to a fight.

to:

** The degree to which gods are shaped and empowered by believers is kind of inconsistent. In ''Hammered'', despite apparently having no believers, Perun remains a viable fighter compared to the Norse, weather control powers rival Thor's while in Asgard of all places, who are is explicitly described as being much stronger because they're his is still remembered thanks to the Prose and Poetic Eddas. Though Perun never fought any of the "big name" Norse like Odin or Thor, just Skadi. Apparently, even a weakened god of thunder is more than a match for a god of skiing. Similarly, the Eddas. The Morrigan matches Freya effortlessly in ''Two Ravens and One Crow'' and outright kills Vidar in ''Tricked''. In the former case, pretty much the same deal. Goddess of death beats out a goddess who is most frequently conflated with Frigg in modern minds. And in the latter, Vidar directly submitted himself to her sphere of influence by challenging her to a fight.
15th Sep '15 10:23:17 AM Eagal
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** The degree to which gods are shaped and empowered by believers is kind of inconsistent. In ''Hammered'', despite apparently having no believers, Perun remains a viable fighter compared to the Norse, who are explicitly described as being much stronger because they're still remembered thanks to the Prose and Poetic Eddas. Similarly, the Morrigan matches Freya effortlessly in ''Two Ravens and One Crow'' and outright kills Vidar in ''Tricked''.

to:

** The degree to which gods are shaped and empowered by believers is kind of inconsistent. In ''Hammered'', despite apparently having no believers, Perun remains a viable fighter compared to the Norse, who are explicitly described as being much stronger because they're still remembered thanks to the Prose and Poetic Eddas. Though Perun never fought any of the "big name" Norse like Odin or Thor, just Skadi. Apparently, even a weakened god of thunder is more than a match for a god of skiing. Similarly, the Morrigan matches Freya effortlessly in ''Two Ravens and One Crow'' and outright kills Vidar in ''Tricked''. In the former case, pretty much the same deal. Goddess of death beats out a goddess who is most frequently conflated with Frigg in modern minds. And in the latter, Vidar directly submitted himself to her sphere of influence by challenging her to a fight.
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