History Literature / IdyllsOfTheKing

1st Jul '16 5:13:28 AM Morgenthaler
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* DroppedABridgeOnHim: Sir Gawain, who dies offstage between "Guinevere" and "The Passing of Arthur."


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* KilledOffscreen: Sir Gawain, who dies offstage between "Guinevere" and "The Passing of Arthur."
1st Jul '16 5:12:40 AM Morgenthaler
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* AccidentalMurder: Balin and Balan, of each other.
* AdaptedOut: Morgaine/Morgause.
* AnyoneCanDie
* TheAtoner: Guinevere and, if you're paying very close attention, Lancelot.

to:

* %%* AccidentalMurder: Balin and Balan, of each other.
* %%* AdaptedOut: Morgaine/Morgause.
* %%* AnyoneCanDie
* %%* TheAtoner: Guinevere and, if you're paying very close attention, Lancelot.



* ChildByRape: Arthur.
* ConsummateLiar: Vivien, although she's right about Guinevere and Lancelot.
* CoolSword: Excalibur.
* CradlingYourKill: "Balin and Balan".

to:

* %%* ChildByRape: Arthur.
* %%* ConsummateLiar: Vivien, although she's right about Guinevere and Lancelot.
* %%* CoolSword: Excalibur.
* %%* CradlingYourKill: "Balin and Balan".



* DeathByDespair: Elaine of Astolat.

to:

* %%* DeathByDespair: Elaine of Astolat.



* GirlInTheTower: Lyonors in "Gareth and Lynette."

to:

* %%* GirlInTheTower: Lyonors in "Gareth and Lynette."



* IncorruptiblePurePureness: Arthur and Galahad.

to:

* %%* IncorruptiblePurePureness: Arthur and Galahad.



* KnightInShiningArmour: Most prominently Arthur, Gareth, and Galahad.
* KnightInSourArmor: Lancelot, especially in "Lancelot and Elaine", "The Holy Grail" and "The Last Tournament."

to:

* %%* KnightInShiningArmour: Most prominently Arthur, Gareth, and Galahad.
* %%* KnightInSourArmor: Lancelot, especially in "Lancelot and Elaine", "The Holy Grail" and "The Last Tournament."



* MerlinAndNimue: Here, Merlin and Vivien.

to:

* %%* MerlinAndNimue: Here, Merlin and Vivien.



* PublicDomainCharacter: The entire cast of characters.

to:

* %%* PublicDomainCharacter: The entire cast of characters.



* SmugSnake: Modred, Vivien.
* SoleSurvivor: Sir Bedivere.

to:

* %%* SmugSnake: Modred, Vivien.
* %%* SoleSurvivor: Sir Bedivere.



* WillNotTellALie: Arthur.
* YourCheatingHeart: Lancelot and Guinevere; Tristram and Isolt.

to:

* %%* WillNotTellALie: Arthur.
* %%* YourCheatingHeart: Lancelot and Guinevere; Tristram and Isolt.
16th May '15 8:59:30 AM LordGro
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Alfred Lord Tennyson's verse narrative ''Idylls of the King'' is inspired by [[KingArthur Arthurian legends]], especially Thomas Malory's ''Literature/LeMorteDarthur''; however, it also draws extensively on the ''{{Mabinogion}}'' and French traditions. The complete ''Idylls'' consists of 12 poems, plus a dedication to the deceased Prince Albert and an epilogue addressed to [[UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria Queen Victoria]]. Tennyson, a longtime enthusiast of the Arthurian tales, worked on the collection for decades: the first four poems appeared in 1859, and the last one in 1885. (In book form, the poems are not in order of writing or publication.)

to:

Alfred Lord Tennyson's Creator/AlfredLordTennyson's verse narrative ''Idylls of the King'' is inspired by [[KingArthur [[Myth/KingArthur Arthurian legends]], especially Thomas Malory's ''Literature/LeMorteDarthur''; however, it also draws extensively on the ''{{Mabinogion}}'' ''Literature/{{Mabinogion}}'' and French traditions. The complete ''Idylls'' consists of 12 poems, plus a dedication to the deceased Prince Albert and an epilogue addressed to [[UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria Queen Victoria]].UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria. Tennyson, a longtime enthusiast of the Arthurian tales, worked on the collection for decades: the first four poems appeared in 1859, and the last one in 1885. (In book form, In the complete book, the poems are not in order of writing or publication.)
publication.



26th Dec '14 9:04:05 PM KamenRiderOokalf
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* ADayInTheLimelight: Because Tennyson doesn't try to replicate Malory in his entirety, a number of significant characters, like Merlin, appear in no more than one or two poems apiece.



* [[DeadManWriting Dead Woman Writing]]: Elaine leaves a posthumous message for the court in "Lancelot and Elaine".

to:

* [[DeadManWriting Dead Woman Writing]]: ADayInTheLimelight: Because Tennyson doesn't try to replicate Malory in his entirety, a number of significant characters, like Merlin, appear in no more than one or two poems apiece.
* DeadManWriting:
Elaine leaves a posthumous message for the court in "Lancelot and Elaine".
17th Nov '14 5:08:16 AM Patachou
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Alfred Lord Tennyson's verse narrative ''Idylls of the King'' is inspired by [[KingArthur Arthurian legends]], especially Thomas Malory's ''Literature/LeMorteDarthur''; however, it also draws extensively on the ''{{Mabinogion}}'' and French traditions. The complete ''Idylls'' consists of 12 poems, plus a dedication to the deceased Prince Albert and an epilogue addressed to [[QueenVicky Queen Victoria]]. Tennyson, a longtime enthusiast of the Arthurian tales, worked on the collection for decades: the first four poems appeared in 1859, and the last one in 1885. (In book form, the poems are not in order of writing or publication.)

to:

Alfred Lord Tennyson's verse narrative ''Idylls of the King'' is inspired by [[KingArthur Arthurian legends]], especially Thomas Malory's ''Literature/LeMorteDarthur''; however, it also draws extensively on the ''{{Mabinogion}}'' and French traditions. The complete ''Idylls'' consists of 12 poems, plus a dedication to the deceased Prince Albert and an epilogue addressed to [[QueenVicky [[UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria Queen Victoria]]. Tennyson, a longtime enthusiast of the Arthurian tales, worked on the collection for decades: the first four poems appeared in 1859, and the last one in 1885. (In book form, the poems are not in order of writing or publication.)
24th Oct '14 11:09:11 AM Patachou
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Added DiffLines:


It was illustrated by Creator/GustaveDore.
1st Apr '14 1:08:02 PM Miriam
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* ADayInTheLimelight: Because Tennyson doesn't try to replicate Malory in his entirety, a number of significant characters, like Merlin, appear in no more than one or two poems apiece.
* AccentuateTheNegative: How Vivien and Modred set to work on other characters.
* AccidentalMurder: Balin and Balan, of each other.
* AdaptedOut: Morgaine/Morgause.



* BeautyEqualsGoodness: Thoroughly deconstructed by the end, as physical appearance turns out to be an utterly unreliable way of judging character.

to:

* BeautyEqualsGoodness: Thoroughly deconstructed by the end, as physical appearance turns out to be an utterly unreliable way of judging character. character.
* BerserkButton: Balin responds badly to any number of things, but especially to perceived insults to himself and to Guinevere.



* ChildByRape: Arthur.
* ChuckCunninghamSyndrome: Tennyson eliminates Morgaine/Morgause.

to:

* ChildByRape: Arthur.
Arthur.
* ChuckCunninghamSyndrome: Tennyson eliminates Morgaine/Morgause. ConsummateLiar: Vivien, although she's right about Guinevere and Lancelot.



* GreenEyedMonster: Guinevere whenever a woman gets too close to Lancelot, as first becomes apparent when Vivien shows up.



* IdiotBall: Carried most noticeably by Merlin, who allows himself to be tricked by Vivien, and Tristram, who hangs around with Isolt even after she warns him that Mark could return at any moment.
* IncorruptiblePurePureness: Galahad.

to:

* HolierThanThou: Pellam's understanding of Christianity.
* IdiotBall: Carried most noticeably by Merlin, who several characters.
** Thanks to his IncorruptiblePurePureness, Arthur doesn't pick up on the relationship between Guinevere and Lancelot.
** Merlin
allows himself to be tricked by Vivien, and Tristram, who hangs around with Vivien.
** Tristram doesn't pack up to go, despite
Isolt even after she warns warning him that Mark could return at any moment.
second.
* IncorruptiblePurePureness: Arthur and Galahad.



* LawfulStupid: As usual, Arthur, who keeps failing to notice the real state of affairs between Lancelot and Guinevere.


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* TameHisAnger: "Balin and Balan" subverts this trope. Balin does his best, but once he's separated from Balan and begins to doubt Guinevere, his self-control evaporates.
* TheDividual: Balin and Balan, of the syndividual type. Balan is capable of restraining Balin's anger issues. Then, they split up.
* TriangRelations: Type 12, although platonic on the male ends. Arthur loves Guinevere and Lancelot. Lancelot loves Guinevere and Arthur. Guinevere loves Lancelot, but not Arthur.


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* WillNotTellALie: Arthur.
23rd Mar '14 6:12:53 PM Miriam
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* DarkerAndEdgier: The poems become grimmer and gorier as the Round Table dissolves.



* GirlInTheTower: Lyonors in "Gareth and Lynette."



* HeroicVow

to:

* HeroicVow GondorCallsForAid: Why Arthur [[JumpedAtTheCall Jumps at the Call]] in "The Coming of Arthur."
** Subverted in "Gareth and Lynette." Because of some backstage maneuvering by Arthur, Lancelot does not go on the quest when Lynette asks; when he does put in an appearance later on, Lynette is exasperated instead of pleased.
* HeroicVow: Knights must swear one to join the Round Table.


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* TheOathBreaker: By the end of the sequence, many of Arthur's knights have betrayed their vows in one way or the other.


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* SlapSlapKiss: Lynette spends most of "Gareth and Lynette" trying to provoke Gareth, whom she believes to be base-born, until she changes her mind near the end.
7th Oct '13 10:35:34 AM SeptimusHeap
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* BloodOnTheseHands: Invoked twice during "The Last Tournament".
14th Apr '13 5:31:54 PM StFan
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* GrailQuest: Obviously.
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