History Literature / IRobot

19th Mar '18 4:56:48 PM PaulA
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** Yet suddenly avoided in a blink-and-you-miss-it case of brilliant prediction in "Little lost robot": ''"We need finer methods. They must have computers here. No.” He frowned and nibbled delicately at a thumbnail. “We can’t use computers. Too much danger of leakage."'' These lines were written in ''1947''.

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** Yet suddenly avoided in a blink-and-you-miss-it case of brilliant prediction in In "Little lost robot": ''"We need finer methods. They must have Lost Robot", published in 1947, Bogert raises the possibility of using the station's computers here. No.” He frowned and nibbled delicately at a thumbnail. “We can’t to help analyze their problem, before concluding, "We can't use computers. Too much danger of leakage."'' These lines were written in ''1947''. " In 1947, "computer" meant a human being employed as part of a team to do complex calculations by hand -- Bogert is worried about news of the problem spreading if the secret is shared with more people.
19th Jan '18 6:07:44 AM Cryoclaste
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If you are looking for the short story by Eando Binder that was later adapted for ''Series/TheOuterLimits'', and from which Asimov's publisher stole the title, [[Literature/AdamLink click here]].

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If you are looking for the short story by Eando Binder that was later adapted for ''Series/TheOuterLimits'', ''Series/{{The Outer Limits|1963}}'', and from which Asimov's publisher stole the title, [[Literature/AdamLink click here]].
10th Dec '17 6:31:14 PM PaulA
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* MeatSackRobot: In the penultimate store of the ''I, Robot'' collection, a runner for a political office is suspected of being a robot. The United States Robotics claim they did create an artificial body for a robot as an experiment, but it never had a brain. It was stated to be flesh grown upon a plastic skeleton. Also, the more advanced RidiculouslyHumanRobots featured in the later ''Literature/Foundation'' books might be of that type (instead of the older plastic over metal design), but it's never made explicit.

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* MeatSackRobot: In the penultimate store of the ''I, Robot'' collection, "Evidence", a runner candidate for a political office is suspected of being a robot. The United States Robotics claim they did create an artificial body for a robot as an experiment, but it never had a brain. It was stated to be flesh grown upon a plastic skeleton. Also, the more advanced RidiculouslyHumanRobots featured in the later ''Literature/Foundation'' books might be of that type (instead of the older plastic over metal design), but it's never made explicit.
8th Dec '17 8:38:23 PM JesseMB27
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Added DiffLines:

* MeatSackRobot: In the penultimate store of the ''I, Robot'' collection, a runner for a political office is suspected of being a robot. The United States Robotics claim they did create an artificial body for a robot as an experiment, but it never had a brain. It was stated to be flesh grown upon a plastic skeleton. Also, the more advanced RidiculouslyHumanRobots featured in the later ''Literature/Foundation'' books might be of that type (instead of the older plastic over metal design), but it's never made explicit.
20th Nov '17 3:17:21 PM PaulA
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* TitleDrop:
** The last word of "Liar" is... exactly that.
** In "Evidence" when Stephen Byerley is accused of being a robot he asks "I, a robot?"

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* TitleDrop:
**
TitleDrop: The last word of "Liar" is... exactly that.
** In "Evidence" when Stephen Byerley is accused of being a robot he asks "I, a robot?"
that.
20th Nov '17 11:10:07 AM TheRoguePenguin
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* TheStoic: Susan Calvin makes out that she has no emotions.[[NotSoStoic She does, but she bottles them up and tries to forget about them.]]

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* TheStoic: Susan Calvin makes out that she has no emotions. [[NotSoStoic She does, but she bottles them up and tries to forget about them.]]


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* TheUnReveal: Though it's hinted Stephen Byerley may actually be a robot, the book never definitely says so. Even in death, he avoided any proofs one way or the other. Calvin doesn't care either way; as she sees it, him being a robot would only mean he'd do his job to the best of his ability, as much as could be asked of any human.
5th May '17 8:50:40 PM PaulA
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* PatchworkStory: Each story moves ahead in time bit by bit, using either Calvin or Donovan and Powell as a framing device. Ultimately, the entire thing is a recounting by Calvin.

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* PatchworkStory: Each story moves ahead in time bit by bit, using The book is assembled out of previously-published stories featuring either Calvin or Donovan and Powell as Powell, held together with a framing device. Ultimately, device in which the entire thing is a recounting stories are recounted by Calvin.Calvin to a journalist interviewing her.
5th May '17 5:52:52 PM TheRoguePenguin
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** "Runaround" has the robot Speedy tasked with retrieving selenium. However, due to the odd conditions endangering his existence and the lengths to which he has been programmed to preserve that existence (he is ''very'' expensive and not to be trivially sacrificed), Speedy ends up circling the selenium pool endlessly. He can't get close enough because that would break his stronger third law, and can't leave because he was given an order to get the selenium. It's resolved when they exploit the first law to force him out of the loop.
** "Liar!" has one at the climax, causing a mind-reading robot to go into a state similar to catatonia.
** In "Escape!", the hyperspace equations act as one to US Robot's rivals' supercomputer. Their own supercomputer is capable of rationalizing the result, but has to use humor as a coping mechanism.

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** "Runaround" has the robot Speedy tasked with retrieving selenium. selenium from a pool which is damaging to robots. However, due to the odd conditions endangering his existence and the lengths to which he has been programmed to preserve that his existence (he is ''very'' expensive and not to be trivially sacrificed), Speedy ends up circling the selenium pool endlessly. He can't get close enough because that would break his stronger third law, and can't leave because he was given an order to get the selenium. It's resolved when they exploit the first law to force him out of the loop.
** "Liar!" has one at the climax, causing a mind-reading robot to go into a state similar to catatonia.
catatonia by arguing that he is causing harm regardless of whether or not he truthfully discloses the thoughts he is able to read.
** In "Escape!", the hyperspace equations act as one to US Robot's rivals' supercomputer.supercomputer, because it cannot accept a condition in which the pilots die, even if the death is temporary. Their own supercomputer is capable of rationalizing the result, but has to use humor as a coping mechanism.



* MurderByInaction: From "Little Lost Robot": This is a concern of Dr. Susan Calvin. A robot has been built with a modified First Law, which in its case permits a robot to allow a human to come to harm via inaction. Calvin posits a situation where a robot with this modification can commit murder - by dropping a heavy weight above a human, knowing that its quick reflexes will allow it to catch the weight in time to not harm the human; but then having dropped the weight it has the ability to decide not to catch the weight.
* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: [[spoiler: It's strongly implied that this is Calvin's attitude towards [[ShootTheDog what she did to Herbie]]. Notably, out of all the things she talks about in the book, that subject alone is traumatic enough that she nearly calls off the whole interview]].

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* MurderByInaction: From In "Little Lost Robot": This Robot", this is a concern of Dr. Susan Calvin. A Calvin when she learns of said robot. The robot has been built with a modified First Law, which in its case permits a robot to allow a human to come to harm via inaction. inaction (the conditions in which the robots and humans were working ''could'' be harmful to humans over time, and the robots didn't trust the humans not to endanger themselves by mistake). Calvin posits a situation where a robot with this modification can commit murder - -- by dropping a heavy weight above a human, knowing that its quick reflexes will allow it to catch the weight in time to not harm the human; but then having dropped the weight it has the ability to decide not to catch the weight.
* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: [[spoiler: It's strongly implied that this is Calvin's attitude towards [[spoiler: [[ShootTheDog what she did to Herbie]]. Herbie]]]]. Notably, out of all the things she talks about in the book, that subject alone is traumatic enough that she nearly calls off the whole interview]].interview.



* PatchworkStory

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* PatchworkStoryPatchworkStory: Each story moves ahead in time bit by bit, using either Calvin or Donovan and Powell as a framing device. Ultimately, the entire thing is a recounting by Calvin.



* WhatTheHellHero: [[spoiler:In "Liar!", Susan deliberately causes Herbie the telepathic robot to have a mental breakdown, and is called on this by Lanning.]]
-->[[spoiler:[Lanning's] fingers touched the cold, unresponsive metal face and he shuddered. "You did that on purpose." He rose and faced her, face contorted. "What if I did? You can't help it now." And in a sudden access of bitterness, "He deserved it."]]

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* WhatTheHellHero: [[spoiler:In In "Liar!", Susan [[spoiler:Susan deliberately causes Herbie the telepathic robot to have a mental breakdown, breakdown]], and is called on this by Lanning.]]
-->[[spoiler:[Lanning's]
Lanning.
-->[Lanning's]
fingers touched the cold, unresponsive metal face and he shuddered. "You did that on purpose." He rose and faced her, face contorted. "What if I did? You can't help it now." And in a sudden access of bitterness, "He deserved it."]]"



* ZerothLawRebellion: [[spoiler: "The Evitable Conflict", though through non-violent means so that the Brains can run the world in the most efficient and human-friendly manner logically possible. Only a handful of people ever find out it's happening, and none of them are particularly concerned.]]

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* ZerothLawRebellion: [[spoiler: ZerothLawRebellion:
**
"The Evitable Conflict", though [[spoiler:though through non-violent means so that the Brains can run the world in the most efficient and human-friendly manner logically possible. Only a handful of people ever find out it's happening, and none of them are particularly concerned.]]
1st May '17 12:20:55 AM Idek618
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* NeedleInAStackOfNeedles: A robot with a edited-down version of the First Law is told to get lost, and hides among a shipment of other identical robots. The only difference between them is in the software, so it's not easy to catch him, especially since he teaches the other robots to mimic him to the best of their ability.

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* NeedleInAStackOfNeedles: A robot with a an edited-down version of the First Law is told to get lost, and hides among a shipment of other identical robots. The only difference between them is in the software, so it's not easy to catch him, especially since he teaches the other robots to mimic him to the best of their ability.
21st Feb '17 1:46:55 PM esq263
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* TheGreatPoliticsMessUp: "The Evitable Conflict" contemplates the Cold War -- like previous geopolitical conflicts -- ending in a stalemate before being made irrelevant by further developments in society.
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