History Literature / Gormenghast

27th Apr '16 1:07:04 PM SantosLHalper
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** The palace guards wear WorldWarI-era German pickelhauben, with Soviet-style telogreikas died in German feldgrau.

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** The palace guards wear WorldWarI-era German pickelhauben, with Soviet-style telogreikas died dyed in German feldgrau.
14th Apr '16 4:25:11 PM SantosLHalper
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** The palace guards wear WorldWarI-era German uniforms, complete with pickelhauben and feldgrau.

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** The palace guards wear WorldWarI-era German uniforms, complete pickelhauben, with pickelhauben and Soviet-style telogreikas died in German feldgrau.
9th Feb '16 4:23:33 AM foxley
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* RisingWatrRisingTension: Book Two sees the usurper Steerpike rising to higher levels in the castle-state\'s hierarchy. As he makes his final bid to overthrow the Groan family and become ruler, torrential unrelenting rain begins and the castle is flooded. The action of the book happens on two levels. As the lower levels of the castle are progressively swamped by floodwaters, its inhabitants struggle for survival, moving themselves and their possessions to higher and higher levels. This adds to the claustrophobic menace of the situation. The flooding becomes a metaphor for cleansing, both of an ancient civilisation strangling in its own history, and of the need to destroy a cancer in the social body - Steerpike. The water rises to menacing levels, and the Princess Fuchsia dies a lonely death by drowning; Titus Groan, the legitimate heir to Ghormenghast, seeks out and kills Steerpike at the point where the floodwaters rise to their highest. Symbolically, after Steerpike's death, the rain stops and the flood recedes.

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* RisingWatrRisingTension: RisingWaterRisingTension: Book Two sees the usurper Steerpike rising to higher levels in the castle-state\'s hierarchy. As he makes his final bid to overthrow the Groan family and become ruler, torrential unrelenting rain begins and the castle is flooded. The action of the book happens on two levels. As the lower levels of the castle are progressively swamped by floodwaters, its inhabitants struggle for survival, moving themselves and their possessions to higher and higher levels. This adds to the claustrophobic menace of the situation. The flooding becomes a metaphor for cleansing, both of an ancient civilisation strangling in its own history, and of the need to destroy a cancer in the social body - Steerpike. The water rises to menacing levels, and the Princess Fuchsia dies a lonely death by drowning; Titus Groan, the legitimate heir to Ghormenghast, seeks out and kills Steerpike at the point where the floodwaters rise to their highest. Symbolically, after Steerpike's death, the rain stops and the flood recedes.
9th Feb '16 4:23:06 AM foxley
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Added DiffLines:

* RisingWatrRisingTension: Book Two sees the usurper Steerpike rising to higher levels in the castle-state\'s hierarchy. As he makes his final bid to overthrow the Groan family and become ruler, torrential unrelenting rain begins and the castle is flooded. The action of the book happens on two levels. As the lower levels of the castle are progressively swamped by floodwaters, its inhabitants struggle for survival, moving themselves and their possessions to higher and higher levels. This adds to the claustrophobic menace of the situation. The flooding becomes a metaphor for cleansing, both of an ancient civilisation strangling in its own history, and of the need to destroy a cancer in the social body - Steerpike. The water rises to menacing levels, and the Princess Fuchsia dies a lonely death by drowning; Titus Groan, the legitimate heir to Ghormenghast, seeks out and kills Steerpike at the point where the floodwaters rise to their highest. Symbolically, after Steerpike's death, the rain stops and the flood recedes.
5th Feb '16 11:49:01 AM kyeo
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* DroppedABridgeOnHim: [[spoiler:Fuschia and the Thing]] both die due to seemingly arbitrary acts of happenstance.



* LoveMartyr: Fuchsia, the romantic BrokenBird who is manipulated into loving Steerpike, dies when the truth about her love is revealed.

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* LoveMartyr: Fuchsia, the romantic BrokenBird who is manipulated into loving Steerpike, dies [[spoiler:dies when the truth about her love is revealed.]]
15th Jan '16 12:01:42 PM SantosLHalper
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The novels are ''very'' gloomy, disguising their actually fairly left-handed place on the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism. They have been described variously as [[ThisIsYourPremiseOnDrugs Dickens on acid]], an Edward Gorey drawing that goes on for a thousand pages, Kafka mainlining Yorkshire pudding and opium, and a DarkerAndEdgier Shakespeare. They are also cluttered and sprawling in a way that few major authors have managed to get away with before or since. The physical clutter of Gormenghast's sprawling castle and spiritual clutter of pointless custom and ritual are all lovingly described, sometimes at great length. In addition, there are [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment whole passages where Peake departs from the plot(s)]] to stage dialogues and visit places and characters that are not even vaguely tied to the story and are never referred to again. Think ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' needed some ruthless editing? ''Gormenghast'' will have you reaching for the shears.

to:

The novels are ''very'' gloomy, disguising their actually fairly left-handed place on the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism. They have been described variously as [[ThisIsYourPremiseOnDrugs Dickens Shakespeare on acid]], an Edward Gorey drawing that goes on for a thousand pages, Kafka mainlining Yorkshire pudding and opium, and a DarkerAndEdgier Shakespeare.Dickens. They are also cluttered and sprawling in a way that few major authors have managed to get away with before or since. The physical clutter of Gormenghast's sprawling castle and spiritual clutter of pointless custom and ritual are all lovingly described, sometimes at great length. In addition, there are [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment whole passages where Peake departs from the plot(s)]] to stage dialogues and visit places and characters that are not even vaguely tied to the story and are never referred to again. Think ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' needed some ruthless editing? ''Gormenghast'' will have you reaching for the shears.
24th Nov '15 2:06:55 PM LahmacunKebab
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* FriendToAllLivingThings: Rather oddly, the Countess. Her cats follow her everywhere, a female goat flat out runs to her to be milked, she keeps plenty of birds...really, she gets on with animals ''much'' better than she does with people.

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* FriendToAllLivingThings: Rather oddly, the Countess. Her cats follow her everywhere, a female goat flat out runs to her to be milked, she keeps plenty of birds... really, she gets on with animals ''much'' better than she does with people.



* ImAHumanitarian: It's implied that Swelter, the EvilChef, is capable of ... pretty much anything, including cannibalism.

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* ImAHumanitarian: It's implied that Swelter, the EvilChef, is capable of ...of... pretty much anything, including cannibalism.



* RoyallyScrewedUp: The Earls of Groan have ruled Gormenghast for centuries in a self-sustaining Kafkaesque bureaucracy, and as a family have acquired a large number of...''eccentricities'' over the years.

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* RoyallyScrewedUp: The Earls of Groan have ruled Gormenghast for centuries in a self-sustaining Kafkaesque bureaucracy, and as a family have acquired a large number of... ''eccentricities'' over the years.
20th Oct '15 2:39:09 PM SantosLHalper
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Added DiffLines:

** The palace guards wear WorldWarI-era German uniforms, complete with pickelhauben and feldgrau.
4th Jan '15 5:37:11 PM nombretomado
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MichaelMoorcock is a great admirer of Gormenghast, which he judges a masterpiece of fantasy and has praised vocally in several instances.

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MichaelMoorcock Creator/MichaelMoorcock is a great admirer of Gormenghast, which he judges a masterpiece of fantasy and has praised vocally in several instances.
28th Nov '14 2:26:39 AM Ciara25
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In 2000, the BBC adapted the work for the small screen as a project explicitly for the new millennium, focussing on the first two books involving Steerpike. Peake purists criticized it for being LighterAndSofter than the books.

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In 2000, the BBC adapted the work for the small screen as a project explicitly for the new millennium, focussing focusing on the first two books involving Steerpike. Peake purists criticized it for being LighterAndSofter than the books.



* AdaptationalHeroism: To a certain extent in the 2000 miniseries. While Steerpike's actions are still evil and are not glossed over, they're partly motivated by his love for and desire to attain Fuchsia; in the books he cared nothing for her and was only using her for his own ends.



* AppropriatedTitle: The intended focus of the series was Titus Groan, title character of the first book, not Gormenghast, the childhood home that he departed from two books into [[AuthorExistenceFailure what should have been]] a longer series. Ironically, the Titus Groan, the first book, does not significantly feature Titus as a character, as he's a very young child.

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* AppropriatedTitle: The intended focus of the series was Titus Groan, title character of the first book, not Gormenghast, the childhood home that he departed from two books into [[AuthorExistenceFailure what should have been]] a longer series. Ironically, the Titus Groan, ''Titus Groan,'' the first book, does not significantly feature Titus as a character, as he's a very young child.



* CrapsackWorld: Gormenghast. In quite an original way- full of pointless rituals that must never be broken, at the expense of everybody's sanity and lives.

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* CrapsackWorld: Gormenghast. In quite an original way- way - full of pointless rituals that must never be broken, broken or ignored, at the expense of everybody's sanity and lives.



* EarnYourHappyEnding: Lots of people die, Gormenghast is devastated by floods -- but in the end, [[spoiler:Titus kills Steerpike and escapes the castle]]. It's a dark and twisted happiness, mind you.
* EvilAlbino: Steerpike is described in terms reminiscent of albinism, but it is not clear that he is actually albino (his vision appears to be unimpaired, for example).

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* EarnYourHappyEnding: Lots ''Lots'' of people die, and Gormenghast is devastated by floods -- but in the end, [[spoiler:Titus kills Steerpike and escapes the castle]]. It's a dark and twisted happiness, mind you.
* EvilAlbino: Steerpike is described in terms reminiscent of albinism, albinism - pale skin, red eyes - but it is not clear that he is actually an albino (his vision appears to be unimpaired, for example).



* HoistByHisOwnPetard: Just when it seems that Steerpike is going to achieve his goals by seducing Fuchsia and getting rid of Titus, [[spoiler: he ruins all his efforts by returning to the room where the bodies of the Twins are, meaning Flay, Prunesquallor and Titus can follow him and find out about his crimes.]]



* InterestingSituationDuel [[spoiler:Flay and Swelter have it out on the flooded, cobweb covered attic.]]

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* InterestingSituationDuel [[spoiler:Flay and Swelter have it out on in the flooded, cobweb covered attic.]]



* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters: Fifty-five prominent characters and many more bit parts.

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* KillThemAll: By the end of the second book, [[spoiler: only Titus, Countess Gertrude, Prunesquallor, Irma and Bellgrove are left alive out of the original main cast.]]
* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters: Fifty-five ''Fifty-five'' prominent characters and many more bit parts.



%%** Prunesquallor. Please add context before un-commenting

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%%** ** Prunesquallor. Please add context His introduction in the second book flat out states that his cardinal virtue is 'an undamaged brain'.
** Titus is perhaps the only one in the whole of Gormenghast to see just how pointless and soul crushing society inside the castle is, and to try and get out
before un-commentingit destroys him.



** Rottcodd because he manages to ignore the events of ''Titus Groan'', lazing off in his hammock.

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** Rottcodd Rottcodd, because he manages to ignore the events of ''Titus Groan'', lazing off in his hammock.



* RoyallyScrewedUp: The Earls of Groan have ruled Gormenghast for centuries in a self-sustaining Kafkaesque bureaucracy, and as a family have acquired a large number of eccentricities over the years.

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* RoyallyScrewedUp: The Earls of Groan have ruled Gormenghast for centuries in a self-sustaining Kafkaesque bureaucracy, and as a family have acquired a large number of eccentricities of...''eccentricities'' over the years.
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