History Literature / GestaDanorum

15th Apr '16 12:47:18 PM LordGro
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* DefiantToTheEnd: The FamousLastWords of Ragnar Lodbrok to King Ella: "How the little pigs would grunt if they knew how the old boar suffers!"
19th Mar '16 1:50:45 PM LordGro
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Added DiffLines:

* TheWeirdSisters: In Book 6, King Fridleif consults "the oracles of the Fates" to ask for how the life of his newborn son Olvar will turn out. He goes to "the house of the gods" where he finds three maidens who are sisters, of which the first two grant beauty, popularity and generosity; but the third one is malicious and rules that Olvar will be considered a miser. The text leaves ambiguous whether the three women are three seers, or the Fates themselves.
13th Mar '16 8:51:34 AM LordGro
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* HeroicAmbidexterity: Invoked: Young king Frode of Denmark (book 5) asks for the daughter of the king of the Huns in marriage, but the princess declines because Frode has not yet earned fame by heroic deeds. Frode's messenger goes on to praise Frode's physical qualities, one of them being that "he use[s] his left hand as well as his right". The intent of this is apparently to convince the princess that Frode has all the potential to become a famous warrior.



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7th Feb '16 10:17:53 AM nombretomado
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* The historical part covers the period from kings Harald Bluetooth (succeeded c. 958 AD) to Canute VI (died 1202), with a focus on the careers of Bishop Absalon and King Valdemar (1157-1182) and their campaigns of conquest against the pagans around the southern shores of the Baltic Sea, part of the series of Northern European wars also known as the [[TheCrusades Northern Crusades]].

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* The historical part covers the period from kings Harald Bluetooth (succeeded c. 958 AD) to Canute VI (died 1202), with a focus on the careers of Bishop Absalon and King Valdemar (1157-1182) and their campaigns of conquest against the pagans around the southern shores of the Baltic Sea, part of the series of Northern European wars also known as the [[TheCrusades [[UsefulNotes/TheCrusades Northern Crusades]].
11th Jan '16 11:32:09 AM TheAmazingBlachman
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* BewareTheQuietOnes: The story of Uffe the Meek. People were very sceptical when the titular prince, know for his withdrawn and quiet manners and slender build, volunteers to defend Denmark's territory and honor against two Saxon nobles. Uffe, however, expertly slays them both and goes on to become an renowned king after his father's death.

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* BewareTheQuietOnes: The story of Uffe the Meek. People were very sceptical when the titular prince, know for his withdrawn and quiet manners and slender build, volunteers to defend Denmark's territory and honor in a duel against two Saxon nobles. Uffe, however, expertly slays them both and goes on to become an renowned king after his father's death.
21st Dec '15 6:41:08 AM Kvaseren
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* BewareTheQuietOnes: The story of Uffe the Meek. People where very sceptical when the titular prince, know for his withdrawn and quiet manners and slender build, volenteers to defend Denmark's terrory and honor against two Saxon nobles. Uffe, however, expertly slays them both and goes on to become an renowned king after his father's death.
* BreakingTheBonds: During his imprisonment for rebellion Ubbe, son of Ragnar Lodbrok, tears his chains "by immense violence". He is then shackled with stronger chains which he is not able to break.

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* BewareTheQuietOnes: The story of Uffe the Meek. People where were very sceptical when the titular prince, know for his withdrawn and quiet manners and slender build, volenteers volunteers to defend Denmark's terrory territory and honor against two Saxon nobles. Uffe, however, expertly slays them both and goes on to become an renowned king after his father's death.
* BreakingTheBonds: During his imprisonment for rebellion rebellion, Ubbe, son of Ragnar Lodbrok, tears his chains "by immense violence". He is then shackled with stronger chains which he is not able to break.
29th Jul '15 1:24:21 PM LordGro
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%%* ActionGirl: Lathgertha

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%%* ActionGirl: Lathgertha %% Zero Context Example. Please write up a full example before uncommenting.
29th Jul '15 1:23:39 PM LordGro
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* AttendingYourOwnFuneral: After Fengo has sent Amleth to England to be killed with a PleaseShootTheMessenger plot, the Danes thinks that Amleth is dead. Just the day they hold a memorial feast for him, Amleth returns to the royal palace. Later in the same night, he finally exexutes his vengeance.

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* AttendingYourOwnFuneral: After Fengo has sent Amleth to England to be killed with a PleaseShootTheMessenger plot, the Danes thinks that Amleth is dead. Just the day they hold a memorial feast for him, Amleth returns to the royal palace. Later in the same night, he finally exexutes executes his vengeance.
29th Jul '15 1:23:21 PM LordGro
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* ActionGirl: Lagertha

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* %%* ActionGirl: Lagertha Lathgertha
29th Jul '15 1:21:22 PM LordGro
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As a source on Myth/NorseMythology, ''Gesta Danorum'' has been in the shadow of the Icelandic Literature/{{Edda}}s and Sagas since the 19th century, although before it, the opposite was the case. Thanks to its use of Latin rather than Old Norse, ''Gesta Danorum'' appealed to Renaissance scholars and was first printed in Paris in 1514, which is why the story of Amleth could find its way to Elizabethan England to serve as the basis of Creator/WilliamShakespeare's play ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}''.[[note]]Though Shakespeare got it via François de Belleforest's French ''Histoires Tragiques'' (1570).[[/note]] Today it is not as high regarded as the Icelandic sources on mythology due to it's obvious bias.

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As a source on Myth/NorseMythology, ''Gesta Danorum'' has been in the shadow of the Icelandic Literature/{{Edda}}s and Sagas since the 19th century, although before it, the opposite was the case. Thanks to its use of Latin rather than Old Norse, ''Gesta Danorum'' appealed to Renaissance scholars and was first printed in Paris in 1514, which is why the story of Amleth could find its way to Elizabethan England to serve as the basis of Creator/WilliamShakespeare's play ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}''.[[note]]Though Shakespeare got it via François de Belleforest's French ''Histoires Tragiques'' (1570).[[/note]] Today it is not as high regarded as the Icelandic sources on mythology due to it's obvious bias.
[[/note]]
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