History Literature / FinnegansWake

11th Jan '17 9:27:10 AM 06tele
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** For one thing the opening sentence, rather than the odd non-sequitir that it seems on surface, is actually an accurate reflection of Dublin's topography: the river Liffey runs past the Adam and Eve Church before swerving past Vico Road upon which one can find Howth Castle and its surroundings. Many other scenes refer to actual locations in Dublin, such as a monument to the Duke of Wellington, the actual Phoenix Park and the many other locations referred to there.

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** For one thing the opening sentence, rather than the odd non-sequitir non-sequitur that it seems on its surface, is actually an accurate reflection of Dublin's topography: describes the river Liffey runs past general layout of Dublin Bay: the Franciscan Friary, a.k.a. Adam and Eve Church before swerving past Vico Road upon which one can find Eve's Church, is indeed on the River Liffey, and the bay itself is marked on its northern end by Howth Castle and on its surroundings.southern end by the Vico Road, which starts at the very southernmost promontory of Dublin Bay and goes south from there. Many other scenes refer to actual locations in Dublin, such as a monument to the Duke of Wellington, the actual Phoenix Park and the many other locations referred to there.
11th Nov '16 6:24:18 PM RaisenRhaasen
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''Finnegans Wake''[[note]]The lack of apostophe is deliberate. If you want rigidly accurate grammar and spelling, this is definitely not the book for you.[[/note]] is a 1939 novel written by Creator/JamesJoyce. It took him 17 years to write, and may take nearly as long to read. The novel is written in English but an idiosyncratic version of the language specifically created for this book. It is an English adapted and inflected with several multilingual and multilayered puns in the style of Creator/LewisCarroll's ''Jabberwocky'' albeit at a far bigger scale. It contains elements, usually obscure puns, from over 60 world languages. The title is a reference to a 1850s Irish ballad called "Finnegan's Wake"[[note]]It has the apostrophe as you may notice[[/note]], a drinking song that tells the story of a man resurrected at his funeral when whiskey is spilled on his corpse.

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''Finnegans Wake''[[note]]The lack of apostophe apostrophe is deliberate. If you want rigidly accurate grammar and spelling, this is definitely not the book for you.[[/note]] is a 1939 novel written by Creator/JamesJoyce. It took him 17 years to write, and may take nearly as long to read. The novel is written in English but an idiosyncratic version of the language specifically created for this book. It is an English adapted and inflected with several multilingual and multilayered puns in the style of Creator/LewisCarroll's ''Jabberwocky'' albeit at a far bigger scale. It contains elements, usually obscure puns, from over 60 world languages. The title is a reference to a 1850s Irish ballad called "Finnegan's Wake"[[note]]It has the apostrophe as you may notice[[/note]], a drinking song that tells the story of a man resurrected at his funeral when whiskey is spilled on his corpse.
25th Oct '16 7:47:30 PM nombretomado
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** Not in, but from the book, we have three. "Quark" was borrowed from here to name the subatomic particle. JosephCampbell also first saw the word "monomyth" in its pages, and GeorgeRRMartin named a castle in ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' after the first word, "riverrun".

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** Not in, but from the book, we have three. "Quark" was borrowed from here to name the subatomic particle. JosephCampbell also first saw the word "monomyth" in its pages, and GeorgeRRMartin Creator/GeorgeRRMartin named a castle in ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' after the first word, "riverrun".
14th Aug '16 3:50:12 PM WillBGood
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** Not in, but from the book, we have three. "Quark" was borrowed from here to name the subatomic particle. JosephCampbell also first saw the word "monomyth" in its pages, and GeorgeRRMartin named a castle in Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire after the first word, "riverrun".

to:

** Not in, but from the book, we have three. "Quark" was borrowed from here to name the subatomic particle. JosephCampbell also first saw the word "monomyth" in its pages, and GeorgeRRMartin named a castle in Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' after the first word, "riverrun".
12th Jun '16 10:06:52 AM JulianLapostat
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Added DiffLines:

* AluminiumChristmasTrees: [[http://peterchrisp.blogspot.in/2015/03/television-in-finnegans-wake.html One section that is surprising to modern readers]] concerns characters watching a discussion on television. The technology of the television had already been unveiled and demonstrated by John Logie Baird in 1925, but had certainly not become a popular mass medium. In other words, this section of the book is technically science-fiction, and accurate in how it anticipates TV watching at pubs in the future.
12th Jun '16 10:01:33 AM JulianLapostat
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** And of course, the word "Wake" has the classic double meaning of a funeral and waking up from sleep, i.e. it can refer to both life and death. This pun is used to similar effect in the titular Irish ballad and fits the constant theme of cycle, resurrection and repitition.

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** And of course, the word "Wake" has the classic double meaning of a funeral and waking up from sleep, i.e. it can refer to both life and death. This pun is used to similar effect in the titular Irish ballad and fits the constant theme of cycle, resurrection and repitition.repitition that is at the heart of the novel. A cycle of constant death and life, or dream and waking up.
12th Jun '16 10:00:26 AM JulianLapostat
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* DoubleMeaningTitle: As noted by Anthony Burgess, the title has multiple meanings. Obviously it refers to the famous Irish ballad from the 19th Century music hall. But since it doesn't have an apostrophe like the song, it becomes a plural, implying multiple Finnegans rather than a single Finnegan. Likewise, the words "Fin" or "Fine" means End in French and Italian, forming the multi-lingual pun of "Fin Again Wake" or "End Again Wake" i.e. an eternal cycle of multiple ends and wakes. [[ReferenceOverdosed That's Joyce for you]].

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* DoubleMeaningTitle: As noted by Anthony Burgess, the title has multiple meanings.
**
Obviously it refers to the famous Irish ballad from the 19th Century music hall. But since it doesn't have an apostrophe like the song, it becomes a plural, implying multiple Finnegans rather than a single Finnegan. Likewise, the words "Fin" or "Fine" means End in French and Italian, forming the multi-lingual pun of "Fin Again Wake" or "End Again Wake" i.e. an eternal cycle of multiple ends and wakes. [[ReferenceOverdosed That's Joyce for you]].
** And of course, the word "Wake" has the classic double meaning of a funeral and waking up from sleep, i.e. it can refer to both life and death. This pun is used to similar effect in the titular Irish ballad and fits the constant theme of cycle, resurrection and repitition.
12th Jun '16 9:56:25 AM JulianLapostat
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* DoubleMeaningTitle: As noted by Anthony Burgess, the title has multiple meanings. Obviously it refers to the famous Irish ballad from the 19th Century music hall. But since it doesn't have an apostrophe like the song, it becomes a plural, implying multiple Finnegans rather than a single Finnegan. Likewise, the words "Fin" or "Fine" means End in French and Italian, forming the multi-lingual pun of "Fin Again Wake" or "End Again Wake" i.e. an eternal cycle of multiple ends and wakes. [[ReferenceOverdosed That's Joyce for you]].



* GuideDangIt: [[RunningGag A rare non-video game usage of the trope,]] as the richness of references used in ''Finnegans Wake'' need to be listed and referenced in a separate volume which will typically be about as massive as the text itself.

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* GuideDangIt: [[RunningGag A rare non-video game usage of the trope,]] as the richness of references used in ''Finnegans Wake'' need to be listed and referenced in a separate volume volume. Joseph Campbell's "Skeleton Key" is quite well known, as is James. W. Atherton's ''The Books of the Wake'' which will typically be about as massive as tracks down all the text itself.literary references in the books (and numbers to 300 pages just to keep score).


Added DiffLines:

* ShownTheirWork: For a work that is suprisingly imaginative and experimental in style, Joyce nonetheless did a lot of accurate research and background checking.
** For one thing the opening sentence, rather than the odd non-sequitir that it seems on surface, is actually an accurate reflection of Dublin's topography: the river Liffey runs past the Adam and Eve Church before swerving past Vico Road upon which one can find Howth Castle and its surroundings. Many other scenes refer to actual locations in Dublin, such as a monument to the Duke of Wellington, the actual Phoenix Park and the many other locations referred to there.
** Likewise, Joyce makes countless accurate references and glosses on history of Ireland and Europe, and also the world. The famous "Anna Livia Plurabelle" chapter refers to rivers flowing through cities from across the world, from Aare to Zambezi. There are also many discrete references to the personal life of Jonathan Swift, via his "Journal to Stella" among many others.
12th Jun '16 6:36:59 AM JulianLapostat
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The plot, discerned over careful readings, concerns a family in the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chapelizod Chapelizod area]] of UsefulNotes/{{Dublin}} and concerns the family of individuals known as Humphrey Chimpden Earwicker (HCE), his wife Anna Livia Plurabelle (ALP), and their children -- brothers Shem and Shaun, and the young sister Issy. Hilarity and Contrapuntal puns Ensue.


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The plot, discerned over careful readings, concerns a family in the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chapelizod Chapelizod area]] of UsefulNotes/{{Dublin}} and concerns the family UsefulNotes/{{Dublin}}, a group of individuals known identified as Humphrey Chimpden Earwicker (HCE), his wife Anna Livia Plurabelle (ALP), and their children -- brothers Shem and Shaun, and the young sister Issy. Hilarity and Contrapuntal puns Ensue.

12th Jun '16 6:30:47 AM JulianLapostat
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[[quoteright:280:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/wake_9279.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:280:A more accurate title, many will find]]

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[[quoteright:280:http://static.[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/wake_9279.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:280:A more accurate title, many will find]]
org/pmwiki/pub/images/first_edition_finnegans_wake.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:First Edition, Faber and Faber, UK]]
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