History Literature / FightingFantasy

7th Feb '16 12:36:58 PM StFan
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* ''TabletopGame/{{Maelstrom}}''
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* ''TabletopGame/{{Maelstrom}}''
4th Feb '16 3:03:45 AM StFan
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Clean-up; moving some examples to Trivia.

!!The books contained examples of:
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!!The books contained !!''Fighting Fantasy'' provides examples of:

!!The books contained examples of: * AnAdventurerIsYou: Usually the classless variety, but on occasion you get to play as a wizard, a demon hunter, or a four-armed space warrior battling an army of dog-headed clones. A particular note goes to ''Creature of Havoc'', in which the reader plays a monster who gets to kill and eat several standard adventuring parties.

!!The books contained examples of: * ArabianNightsDays: ''Magehunter''

* AWinnerIsYou: Several of the books have disappointing endings, the last "reference" being only a few lines long and giving no details on the outcome. Particular offenders: ''Space Assassin'', ''The Rings of Kether'', ''Rebel Planet'' and ''Deathmoor''. Even more annoying, ''Masks of Mayhem'', which has a two-line ending to avoid giving away its TwistEnding. * AnAdventurerIsYou: Usually the classless variety, but on occasion you get to play as a wizard, a demon hunter, or a four-armed space warrior battling an army of dog-headed clones. A particular note goes to ''Creature of Havoc'', in which the reader plays a monster who gets to kill and eat several standard adventuring parties. * {{Arabian Nights Days}}: ''Magehunter'' * AuthorAvatar / CreatorThumbprint: Ian Livingstone seems to be a sailboat racing fan, given how he sneaks references to his racing teams into ''Return To Firetop Mountain'' and ''Armies Of Death''.

* BillingDisplacement: Steve Jackson and Ian Livingstone's names are on the cover of every book[[note]]even though Jackson stopped writing for the series halfway through and only wrote six out of the fifty-nine original entries; Livingstone wrote a total of thirteen books right up until Puffin stopped the series, and has written new adventures for the Wizard series as recently as 2012[[/note]] due to contractual obligations when multiple copycat series required new titles to be published faster than the two of them could write. The actual author's name only appears inside the book. * BitterAlmonds: At least one book had this as the only way to tell that a bottle of liquid you have the option to drink was poison. * BodyHorror: Happens every now and then, but most notable in Beneath Nightmare Castle, thanks to the BigBad Xathaz, a sorcerer who worships Lovecraft style gods, leading to both him and his followers gaining LovecraftianSuperpower. One of the illustrations in said book was actually banned because the publishers thought the audience would get too scared. [[spoiler: It's of a woman with black eyes with tentacles coming out of her mouth]]. Its viewable on the Fighting Fantasy Wiki.
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* BillingDisplacement: Steve Jackson and Ian Livingstone's names are on the cover of every book[[note]]even though Jackson stopped writing for the series halfway through and only wrote six out of the fifty-nine original entries; Livingstone wrote a total of thirteen books right up until Puffin stopped the series, and has written new adventures for the Wizard series as recently as 2012[[/note]] due to contractual obligations when multiple copycat series required new titles to be published faster than the two of them could write. The actual author's name only appears inside the book. * BitterAlmonds: At least one book had has this as the only way to tell that a bottle of liquid you have the option to drink was is poison. * BodyHorror: Happens every now and then, but most notable in Beneath ''Beneath Nightmare Castle, Castle'', thanks to the BigBad Xathaz, a sorcerer who worships Lovecraft style Lovecraft-style gods, leading to both him and his followers gaining LovecraftianSuperpower. One of the illustrations in said book was actually banned because the publishers thought the audience would get too scared. [[spoiler: It's [[spoiler:It's of a woman with black eyes with tentacles coming out of her mouth]]. Its viewable on the Fighting Fantasy Wiki.

* CelibateHero: You might run into a fair number of beautiful women but don't expect so much as a kiss in these books. ** Although there's a notable aversion in [[spoiler: ''Vault of the Vampire'', section 301]].
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* CelibateHero: You might run into a fair number of beautiful women but don't expect so much as a kiss in these books. ** books. Although there's a notable aversion in [[spoiler: ''Vault [[spoiler:''Vault of the Vampire'', section 301]].

* ChooseYourOwnAdventure: TropeCodifier. ''Literature/FightingFantasy'' introduced or at least popularised the TabletopRPG elements found in most subsequent gamebooks. * ChronicHeroSyndrome: While normally you're kind of expected to help out anyone you encounter who needs it, ''Slaves of the Abyss'' has an interesting aversion where one character [[spoiler: the one who actually caused or exacerbated most of the problems you're facing in the first place]] tells you to focus on the big picture and not stop to blow everyone's nose for them or the country's doomed. On the other hand, you as the player at least know you're fighting the clock to save the day in that book. * CircusOfFear: The Circus of Dreams from ''Legend of the Shadow Warriors'', in which the performers were all [[PlantPeople mandrakes]]. They replaced the inhabitants of each town they visited with more mandrakes. * ContinuityNod: After a while, the authors started including more and more references to previous books. For example, the ''Trial of Champions'' follows the player through a reworked version of ''Deathtrap Dungeon'', and the protagonist goes on to star in ''Armies of Death''. Likewise, the plot of ''The Crimson Tide'' is kicked off by events that occur in ''Black Vein Prophecy'', and the PC of the former can meet several character from the latter, as well as a diplomatic envoy from Hachiman, previously seen in ''Sword of the Samurai''.
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* ChooseYourOwnAdventure: TropeCodifier. ''Literature/FightingFantasy'' ''Fighting Fantasy'' introduced or at least popularised the TabletopRPG elements found in most subsequent gamebooks. * ChronicHeroSyndrome: While normally you're kind of expected to help out anyone you encounter who needs it, ''Slaves of the Abyss'' has an interesting aversion where one character [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:(the one who actually caused or exacerbated most of the problems you're facing in the first place]] place)]] tells you to focus on the big picture and not stop to blow everyone's nose for them or the country's doomed. On the other hand, you as the player at least know you're fighting the clock to save the day in that book. * CircusOfFear: The Circus of Dreams from ''Legend of the Shadow Warriors'', in which the performers were are all [[PlantPeople mandrakes]]. They replaced the inhabitants of each town they visited with more mandrakes. * ContinuityNod: After a while, the authors started including more and more references to previous books. books. ** For example, the ''Trial of Champions'' follows the player through a reworked version of ''Deathtrap Dungeon'', and the protagonist goes on to star in ''Armies of Death''. Death''. ** Likewise, the plot of ''The Crimson Tide'' is kicked off by events that occur in ''Black Vein Prophecy'', and the PC of the former can meet several character from the latter, as well as a diplomatic envoy from Hachiman, previously seen in ''Sword of the Samurai''.

** In Caverns of the Snow Witch characters will pass in view of Firetop Mountain, and one of the companions will ask if the Warlock still rules Firetop Mountain. Presumably the player is about to answer when they are interrupted, since the reader may or may not have read that book.
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** In Caverns ''Caverns of the Snow Witch Witch'', characters will pass in view of Firetop Mountain, and one of the companions will ask if the Warlock still rules Firetop Mountain. Presumably the player is about to answer when they are interrupted, since the reader may or may not have read that book.

** You'd think that the menacing pumpkin-headed figures are the title characters of ''Legend of the Shadow Warriors'', whereas they are actually [[spoiler: just manifestations of nature's wrath against man, a force of good, not evil]]. ** the original cover for ''City Of Thieves'' shows the books BigBad Zambar Bone alongside a shot of the city Port Blacksand, making it seem like the whole story takes place there and thats where the final showdown will take place, but nope, your time in Blacksand is spent searching for the wizard Nicodemus, and later the necessary components for a compound that can destroy the villain. Zambar Bone's own lair is nowhere near Port Blacksand.
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** You'd think that the menacing pumpkin-headed figures are the title characters of ''Legend of the Shadow Warriors'', whereas they are actually [[spoiler: just [[spoiler:just manifestations of nature's wrath against man, a force of good, not evil]]. ** the The original cover for ''City Of Thieves'' shows the books BigBad Zambar Bone alongside a shot of the city Port Blacksand, making it seem like the whole story takes place there and thats that's where the final showdown will take place, but place. But nope, your time in Blacksand is spent searching for the wizard Nicodemus, and later the necessary components for a compound that can destroy the villain. Zambar Bone's own lair is nowhere near Port Blacksand.Blacksand. * CreatorThumbprint: Ian Livingstone seems to be a sailboat racing fan, given how he sneaks references to his racing teams into ''Return To Firetop Mountain'' and ''Armies Of Death''.

** In the beginning of ''Demons of the Deep'' the hero is made to walk the plank, tied up, into the sea by pirates and ''just happens'' to plunge down onto magic marks deep in the ocean which grant you with gills! *** And said pirates even gave him ''Provisions'' as a (stupidly wasteful) sick joke. Which also happen to be preserved by the magic.
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** In the beginning of ''Demons of the Deep'' the hero is made to walk the plank, tied up, into the sea by pirates -- and ''just happens'' to plunge down onto magic marks deep in the ocean which grant you with gills! *** gills! And said pirates even gave him ''Provisions'' as a (stupidly wasteful) sick joke. Which also happen to be preserved by the magic.

* DrivenToSuicide: ''Deathmoor'' features one of the most esoteric deaths in the series - it's possible to revisit the same references repeatedly whilst lost on the titular moor, and if you visit one particular reference (which points out the feeling that you're going around and around in circles) three times in all you are directed to the following paragraph:
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* DrivenToSuicide: ''Deathmoor'' features one of the most esoteric deaths in the series - -- it's possible to revisit the same references repeatedly whilst lost on the titular moor, and if you visit one particular reference (which points out the feeling that you're going around and around in circles) three times in all you are directed to the following paragraph:

* {{Early Installment Weirdness}}: In the first book, you can only eat a meal when specifically given the option. Subsequent books let you eat at any time except when fighting. The same book also gave out extraordinarily large Luck prizes and Skill points at times when it really made no sense. Like after deciding to search a dead body, but before discussing what's special about whatever you took.
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* {{Early Installment Weirdness}}: EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: ** In the first book, you can only eat a meal when specifically given the option. Subsequent books let you eat at any time except when fighting. The same book also gave out extraordinarily large Luck prizes and Skill points at times when it really made no sense. Like after deciding to search a dead body, but before discussing what's special about whatever you took.

* EverythingsBetterWithDinosaurs ** In a couple of the books you fight lizard men who use dinosaurs as mounts.
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* EverythingsBetterWithDinosaurs EverythingsBetterWithDinosaurs: ** In a couple of the books you fight lizard men lizardmen who use dinosaurs as mounts.

* {{Evil Lawyer Joke}}: The background section to ''Portal of Evil'' states that "there were robbers of all kinds, from desperate outlaws to clerks and lawyers." * FailureIsTheOnlyOption: If you eat some mouldy food in ''Trial of Champions'', [[spoiler: it turns out it was infected with parasites that will slowly bore through your stomach. You lose 1 STAMINA point for each new section you turn to; this is fairly late in the game, so it is still possible to win, you'll just die if you reach '''400'''.]] * FateWorseThanDeath: Some of the 'deaths' you can reach are actually this. In the book ''Night of the Necromancer'', the character you play is DeadToBeginWith, so ''all'' of the bad endings are this. BalefulPolymorph endings are also commonplace, with lycanthropy curses a particular apparent favourite of many of the authors. ''Howl Of The Werewolf'' places its cards on the table right from the very title. * FeaturelessProtagonist: Generally played straight in the original series, with one notable exception - ''Legend of Zagor'' requires you to play as one of the characters from the non-interactive Zagor Chronicles spin-off series[[note]]All four of the characters are male - there was one female character in the Zagor Chronicles series, but for ''Legend'' she was replaced by her brother[[/note]]. The second run of Wizard reissues changed the books by offering three predetermined characters with a name and short biography if the player didn't want to roll their own character. * FishMen: A few are encountered as monsters, but one benevolent example is Cyrano the Swordfish, a master swordsman who dwells in a magical painting and will provide the main character with a swordfighting lesson in ''Demons of the Deep.''
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* {{Evil Lawyer Joke}}: EvilLawyerJoke: The background section to ''Portal of Evil'' states that "there were robbers of all kinds, from desperate outlaws to clerks and lawyers." * FailureIsTheOnlyOption: If you eat some mouldy food in ''Trial of Champions'', [[spoiler: it [[spoiler:it turns out it was infected with parasites that will slowly bore through your stomach. You lose 1 STAMINA point for each new section you turn to; this is fairly late in the game, so it is still possible to win, you'll just die if you reach '''400'''.]] * FateWorseThanDeath: Some of the 'deaths' "deaths" you can reach are actually this. this. ** In the book ''Night of the Necromancer'', the character you play is DeadToBeginWith, so ''all'' of the bad endings are this. this. ** BalefulPolymorph endings are also commonplace, with lycanthropy curses a particular apparent favourite favorite of many of the authors. ''Howl Of The of the Werewolf'' places its cards on the table right from the very title. * FeaturelessProtagonist: Generally played straight in the original series, with one notable exception - -- ''Legend of Zagor'' requires you to play as one of the characters from the non-interactive Zagor Chronicles spin-off series[[note]]All four of the characters are male - -- there was one female character in the Zagor Chronicles series, but for ''Legend'' she was replaced by her brother[[/note]]. The second run of Wizard reissues changed the books by offering three predetermined characters with a name and short biography if the player didn't want to roll their own character. * FishMen: A few are encountered as monsters, but one benevolent example is Cyrano the Swordfish, a master swordsman who dwells in a magical painting and will provide the main character with a swordfighting lesson in ''Demons of the Deep.''Deep''.

* FrankensteinsMonster: In ''Legend of the Shadow Warriors'' [[spoiler: it turns out that Dr. Kauderwelsch is a would-be Dr. Frankenstein, working on one of these]]. And then her son yes, the Son of Kauderwelsch performs the same trick in ''Moonrunner'' by chopping up the inmates of an [[BedlamHouse insane asylum]] and piecing them together in an effort to resurrect his mother. * GameBreakingBug: In ''Revenge of the Vampire'', one can chase after the vampire if you pay "all of your gold" to buy a horse. You can only confront said vampire early if you catch up to him at a coaching inn; and then pay for a room; but there's no opportunities to gain gold inbetween. This causes the player to lose out on an early InfinityMinusOneSword; and a PlotCoupon. It's still possible to win if you take the game literally, but it's harder and there's sections that refer to the PlotCoupon. ** This gets stranger later in the book; in the room of the minion who had InfinityMinusOneSword; he's only in the room if you prove that you killed said minion. Also, the coach that you chased can be seen parked at the vampire's mansion...and it again has a coffin in it, even if you destroyed it early.
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* FrankensteinsMonster: In ''Legend of the Shadow Warriors'' [[spoiler: it [[spoiler:it turns out that Dr. Kauderwelsch is a would-be Dr. Frankenstein, working on one of these]]. And then her son -- yes, the Son of Kauderwelsch -- performs the same trick in ''Moonrunner'' by chopping up the inmates of an [[BedlamHouse insane asylum]] and piecing them together in an effort to resurrect his mother. * GameBreakingBug: GameBreakingBug: ** In ''Revenge of the Vampire'', one can chase after the vampire if you pay "all of your gold" to buy a horse. You can only confront said vampire early if you catch up to him at a coaching inn; and then pay for a room; but there's no opportunities to gain gold inbetween. This causes the player to lose out on an early InfinityMinusOneSword; and a PlotCoupon. It's still possible to win if you take the game literally, but it's harder and there's sections that refer to the PlotCoupon. ** This gets stranger later in the book; in the room of the minion who had InfinityMinusOneSword; he's only in the room if you prove that you killed said minion. Also, the coach that you chased can be seen parked at the vampire's mansion... and it again has a coffin in it, even if you destroyed it early.

* HeroicMime: Most of the time. The hero of these stories sometimes speaks, but its rare, and he's almost never quoted. * HeroicSacrifice: {{Averted}} in ''Slaves of the Abyss''; the authors wanted the player to sacrifice themselves, staying in the Abyss to allow everyone else to go free, but Steve Jackson insisted that the reader get a massive reward at the end.
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* HeroicMime: Most of the time. The hero of these stories sometimes speaks, but its it's rare, and he's almost never quoted. * HeroicSacrifice: HeroicSacrifice: ** {{Averted}} in ''Slaves of the Abyss''; the authors wanted the player to sacrifice themselves, staying in the Abyss to allow everyone else to go free, but Steve Jackson insisted that the reader get a massive reward at the end.

* HoistByHisOwnPetard: The Archmage from ''Spectral Stalkers'' sends a group of unstoppable demons called the Spectral Stalkers after the bearer of an artifact called the Aleph. You eventually hand him the Aleph... just as the Spectral Stalkers are about to appear in his throne room. The resulting OhCrap moment is stupendous.
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* HoistByHisOwnPetard: HoistByHisOwnPetard: ** The Archmage from ''Spectral Stalkers'' sends a group of unstoppable demons called the Spectral Stalkers after the bearer of an artifact called the Aleph. You eventually hand him the Aleph... just as the Spectral Stalkers are about to appear in his throne room. The resulting OhCrap moment is stupendous.

* HumanoidAbomination: Most of the opponents in ''Creatures of Chaos''. ** Not to mention the Abomination from Dead of Night, a undead creature formed from the corpse of a necromancer.
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* HumanoidAbomination: HumanoidAbomination: ** Most of the opponents in ''Creatures of Chaos''. ** Not to mention the Abomination from Dead ''Dead of Night, Night'', a undead creature formed from the corpse of a necromancer.

* InfinityPlusOneSword: While there have been many powerful weapons in FF that aren't just a Magic Sword giving you +2 Attack Strength or +1 Skill, the ultimate weapon in your hands had to be the Trident of Skarlos that you can find in Beneath Nightmare Castle. It gave you +2 Attack Strength and +2 damage against undead (which was practically every enemy at this point). Against the last boss, it would do +5 damage because it took an unnatural joy at skewering the hell out of him * InstantAwesomeJustAddNinja: One of the competing champions in ''Deathtrap Dungeon''. ''Armies of Death'': the "Elite Fanatic." ''Caverns of the Snow Witch'' has a magic ring you can use to summon a random warrior to fight for you; one of the possibilities is a ninja. * IntercontinuityCrossover: The Chaos Warriors of the ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'' universe appear here as well, possibly due to Ian Livingstone and Steve Jackson being involved both with Fighting Fantasy and Games Workshop. * {{Karma Meter}}: Honour in several of the books. In ''Sword of the Samurai'', if Honour drops to 0, the main character automatically commits seppuku. In ''Knights of Doom'', the lower the PC's Honour, the easier it is to corrupt them. ''Tower of Destruction'' has a stat with similar utility. Honour also appears in ''Night Dragon'', though having too little has no adverse effects. In all of these books, a sufficiently high Honour score nets bonuses towards the end.
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* InfinityPlusOneSword: While there have been many powerful weapons in FF that aren't just a Magic Sword giving you +2 Attack Strength or +1 Skill, the ultimate weapon in your hands had has to be the Trident of Skarlos that you can find in Beneath ''Beneath Nightmare Castle. Castle''. It gave gives you +2 Attack Strength and +2 damage against undead (which was is practically every enemy at this point). Against the last boss, it would will do +5 damage because it took takes an unnatural joy at skewering the hell out of him him. * InstantAwesomeJustAddNinja: InstantAwesomeJustAddNinja: ** One of the competing champions in ''Deathtrap Dungeon''. Dungeon''. ** ''Armies of Death'': the "Elite Fanatic." Fanatic". ** ''Caverns of the Snow Witch'' has a magic ring you can use to summon a random warrior to fight for you; one of the possibilities is a ninja. * IntercontinuityCrossover: The Chaos Warriors of the ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'' universe appear here as well, possibly due to Ian Livingstone and Steve Jackson being involved both with Fighting Fantasy ''Fighting Fantasy'' and Games Workshop. * {{Karma Meter}}: KarmaMeter: Honour in several of the books. In all of these books, a sufficiently high Honour score nets bonuses towards the end. ** In ''Sword of the Samurai'', if Honour drops to 0, the main character automatically commits seppuku. seppuku. ** In ''Knights of Doom'', the lower the PC's Honour, the easier it is to corrupt them. ''Tower of Destruction'' has a stat with similar utility. utility. ** Honour also appears in ''Night Dragon'', though having too little has no adverse effects. In all of these books, a sufficiently high Honour score nets bonuses towards the end.effects.

* KnightInShiningArmour: You play as one in ''Knights of Doom''
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* KnightInShiningArmour: You play as one in ''Knights of Doom''Doom''.

* LostForever: Ian Livingstone's books are particularly bad for this - you have one chance only to get the PlotCoupons you need to win the game, and very few (if any) of them are signposted.
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* LostForever: Ian Livingstone's books are particularly bad for this - -- you have one chance only to get the PlotCoupons you need to win the game, and very few (if any) of them are signposted.

** The Hungarian translations take great pains to transplant every riddle correctly as well. Not too surprising, given that Hungary has a very large and active fantasy/roleplaying scene with several publishing companies dedicated solely to it, one of which publishes the Literature/FightingFantasy gamebooks. * LoveRedeems: See CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming. * LuckBasedMission: In the first part of ''Creature Of Havoc'', your character is almost mindless, so instead of choosing what to do, you have to roll dice. Also, this trope comes into play in virtually every book in a different respect: often, there's no way of judging what will or won't harm you except for having played the gamebook before. ** In The Forest of Doom, you can easily miss one or both halves of the hammer that you're supposed to retrieve. If you do, you have to start over again, as there is no way to backtrack to get them, and there is little to no indication of where the parts are - both are easily missed, and one requires success in two other specific previous encounters to even find it.
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** The Hungarian translations take great pains to transplant every riddle correctly as well. Not too surprising, given that Hungary has a very large and active fantasy/roleplaying scene with several publishing companies dedicated solely to it, one of which publishes the Literature/FightingFantasy ''Fighting Fantasy'' gamebooks. * %%* LoveRedeems: See CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming. * LuckBasedMission: LuckBasedMission: ** In the first part of ''Creature Of of Havoc'', your character is almost mindless, so instead of choosing what to do, you have to roll dice. Also, this dice. ** This trope comes into play in virtually every book in a different respect: often, there's no way of judging what will or won't harm you except for having played the gamebook before. ** In The ''The Forest of Doom, Doom'', you can easily miss one or both halves of the hammer that you're supposed to retrieve. If you do, you have to start over again, as there is no way to backtrack to get them, and there is little to no indication of where the parts are - -- both are easily missed, and one requires success in two other specific previous encounters to even find it.

* LukeIAmYourFather: The player character of ''[[spoiler:Black Vein Prophecy]]''
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* LukeIAmYourFather: The player character of ''[[spoiler:Black Vein Prophecy]]''Prophecy]]''.

* TheManyDeathsOfYou / HaveANiceDeath: You can die in combat, but you can also suffer a number of "instant death" fates, ranging from being permanently imprisoned to crushed beneath a falling ceiling to passing out from the poisonous fumes in a monster's lair and then being devoured by said monster to being paralysed and devoured by the undead. * MarketBasedTitle: ''House of Hell'' became ''House of Hades'' in America, because 'Hell' is considered a curse over there.
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* TheManyDeathsOfYou / HaveANiceDeath: TheManyDeathsOfYou: You can die in combat, but you can also suffer a number of "instant death" fates, ranging from being permanently imprisoned to crushed beneath a falling ceiling to passing out from the poisonous fumes in a monster's lair and then being devoured by said monster to being paralysed and devoured by the undead. * MarketBasedTitle: ''House of Hell'' became ''House of Hades'' in America, because 'Hell' "Hell" is considered a curse over there.

* MilestoneCelebration: ''Return to Firetop Mountain'', as its name suggests, takes place in the same location as the first book, in order to mark both the fiftieth book and the 10-year anniversary of the franchise.

* NighInvulnerable: Many demonic and undead enemies are immune to normal weapons and if you didn't have a magic sword and an escape option, then the monster would kill you automatically. Zanbar Bone took the cake, to kill him your character first had to shoot him through the heart with a silver arrow. This only paralysed him for a short time. Then you must rub a mixture of witches hair and black lotus into his eye sockets. He was immune to everything else. * NintendoHard: Most of the books were designed to entertain and amuse adolescent and young adult readers. ''Creature of Havoc'', however, is designed to make you kill yourself in frustration.\\ Some of Ian Livingstone's books were also unpleasant in this regard, forcing you into constant combats, many of which are against enemies with extremely high Skill scores and that much harder to beat. What's exceptionally galling about Livingstone is that sometimes he doesn't even give you any Provisions (the general equivalent to {{Healing Potion}}s) to start out with, and you have precious few opportunities to heal at all. ** ''Crypt of the Sorcerer'' is the most unfairly difficult book in the entire series. Even if you make all the correct choices and have the highest possible stats, there's still a chance of being randomly killed (e.g. at one point you must roll a dice: if you roll a 1, you die - and no amount of Luck or magic items can save you) or weakened to the point you can no longer defeat the BigBad... However, what really sets this particular book apart is the final battle: provided you have the highest possible Skill score (12), you have a mere 5.5% chance of winning. * NoFairCheating: ''Midnight Rogue'' had one of these as well and another where if you attempted to pull out a magic weapon to fight a gargoyle, the book would tell you that there is no way you could have acquired one yet and tell you to start over, "honestly this time". Since you played a thief in this book that was a bit rich... ''Tower of Destruction'' had a section that gave the reader a slap on the wrist for cheating at one point, as it terminates the current sequence and denies you any further advantages you might've been able to find instead of just ending the game. More annoyingly, ''Black Vein Prophecy'' and ''The Crimson Tide'' each have a situation where the player must ''fail'' a dice roll in order to win. * NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished: Trying to help a fellow galley slave at the start of ''Masters of Chaos'' just gets ''you'' whipped instead.
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* NighInvulnerable: Many demonic and undead enemies are immune to normal weapons and if you didn't don't have a magic sword and an escape option, then the monster would kill you automatically. Zanbar Bone took takes the cake, cake: to kill him your character first had has to shoot him through the heart with a silver arrow. This only paralysed paralyses him for a short time. Then time; then you must rub a mixture of witches witches' hair and black lotus into his eye sockets. He was is immune to everything else. * NintendoHard: NintendoHard: ** Most of the books were are designed to entertain and amuse adolescent and young adult young-adult readers. ''Creature of Havoc'', however, is designed to make you kill yourself in frustration.\\ frustration. ** Some of Ian Livingstone's books were are also unpleasant in this regard, forcing you into constant combats, many of which are against enemies with extremely high Skill scores and that much harder to beat. What's exceptionally galling about Livingstone is that sometimes he doesn't even give you any Provisions (the general equivalent to {{Healing Potion}}s) to start out with, and you have precious few opportunities to heal at all. ** ''Crypt of the Sorcerer'' is the most unfairly difficult book in the entire series. Even if you make all the correct choices and have the highest possible stats, there's still a chance of being randomly killed (e.g. at one point you must roll a dice: if you roll a 1, you die - -- and no amount of Luck or magic items can save you) or weakened to the point you can no longer defeat the BigBad... However, what really sets this particular book apart is the final battle: provided you have the highest possible Skill score (12), you have a mere 5.5% chance of winning. * NoFairCheating: NoFairCheating: ** ''Midnight Rogue'' had one of these as well and another where if you attempted to pull out a magic weapon to fight a gargoyle, the book would tell you that there is no way you could have acquired one yet and tell you to start over, "honestly this time". Since you played plays a thief in this book that was is a bit rich... rich... ** ''Tower of Destruction'' had has a section that gave gives the reader a slap on the wrist for cheating at one point, as it terminates the current sequence and denies you any further advantages you might've been able to find instead of just ending the game. game. ** More annoyingly, ''Black Vein Prophecy'' and ''The Crimson Tide'' each have a situation where the player must ''fail'' a dice roll in order to win. * NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished: NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished: ** Trying to help a fellow galley slave at the start of ''Masters of Chaos'' just gets ''you'' whipped instead.

* NoOntologicalInertia: After the villain of Spectral Stalkers dies, all of his creations die with him and his [[LoadBearingBoss castle starts to fall apart]]. * NumericalThemeNaming: The traitor in Masks of Mayhem has a number hidden in their name ([[spoiler:Ifor Tynin]]) to tell you which reference to turn to when your character realises they have been betrayed. Genre savvy players will have identified him as the traitor the moment they saw his name written down. * OneSteveLimit: Averted quite literally; see Name's The Same in the Trivia section.
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* NoOntologicalInertia: After the villain of Spectral Stalkers ''Spectral Stalkers'' dies, all of his creations die with him and his [[LoadBearingBoss castle starts to fall apart]]. * NumericalThemeNaming: The traitor in Masks ''Masks of Mayhem Mayhem'' has a number hidden in their name ([[spoiler:Ifor Tynin]]) to tell you which reference to turn to when your character realises they have been betrayed. Genre savvy players will have identified him as the traitor the moment they saw his name written down. * OneSteveLimit: Averted quite literally; see Name's The the Same in the Trivia section.

* OurZombiesAreDifferent: The Slave Warriors from "Portal of Evil." They don't eat flesh and retain just enough of their minds to wield weapons, albeit clumsily. In all other respects, they're zombies.
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* OurZombiesAreDifferent: The Slave Warriors from "Portal ''Portal of Evil." Evil''. They don't eat flesh and retain just enough of their minds to wield weapons, albeit clumsily. In all other respects, they're zombies.

* PlantPerson: The Mandrakes from Legend Of the Shadow Warriors, a magical plant species that can mimic a human being. * PrintLongRunners: The series has been running since 1982, including a seven-year gap between 1995 and 2002. There are currently 64 different gamebooks across the Puffin and Wizard print runs, plus the four-volume ''Literature/{{Sorcery}}'' spinoff, two books that adapt the rules for a TabletopRPG, two supplementary titles (''Out of the Pit'' lists various monsters, ''Titan'' is a guide to the world of Fighting Fantasy) four books in the ''Advanced Fighting Fantasy'' system, seven novels, a magazine that ran for three years, the two ''Clash of the Princes'' books which form a two-player adventure, the [=10th=] Anniversary Yearbook, and the [=25th=] Anniversary edition of ''Warlock of Firetop Mountain''.
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* PlantPerson: The Mandrakes from Legend Of ''Legend of the Shadow Warriors, Warriors'', a magical plant species that can mimic a human being. * PrintLongRunners: The series has been running since 1982, including a seven-year gap between 1995 and 2002. There are currently 64 different gamebooks across the Puffin and Wizard print runs, plus the four-volume ''Literature/{{Sorcery}}'' spinoff, two books that adapt the rules for a TabletopRPG, two supplementary titles (''Out of the Pit'' lists various monsters, ''Titan'' is a guide to the world of Fighting Fantasy) ''Fighting Fantasy'') four books in the ''Advanced Fighting Fantasy'' system, seven novels, a magazine that ran for three years, the two ''Clash of the Princes'' books which form a two-player adventure, the [=10th=] Anniversary Yearbook, and the [=25th=] Anniversary edition of ''Warlock of Firetop Mountain''.

* {{Quirky Miniboss Squad}}: The Shadow Warriors. * RedHerring: Goes all the way back to the very first book, which featured a Y-shaped stick whose only function was to break and be useless. As time went on, in order to provide a challenge for increasingly GenreSavvy readers, the writers started including items which would only hinder the player. For example, in ''House of Hell'' the player is encouraged to look for the Man in Grey. This character does exist, and he ''is'' an enemy of the antagonists, but the information he gives you won't help you much. * TheRestShallPass: When you're making your way through the villain's lair in ''Portal Of Evil'', you can rescue two of his prisoners. If you do, they'll help you fight the villain's bodyguards. Rescue both of them and they'll each take on one of the guards and free you up to take on the villain.
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* {{Quirky Miniboss Squad}}: QuirkyMinibossSquad: The Shadow Warriors. * RedHerring: Goes all the way back to the very first book, which featured a Y-shaped stick whose only function was is to break and be useless. As time went on, in order to provide a challenge for increasingly GenreSavvy readers, the writers started including items which would only hinder the player. For example, in ''House of Hell'' the player is encouraged to look for the Man in Grey. This character does exist, and he ''is'' an enemy of the antagonists, but the information he gives you won't help you much. * TheRestShallPass: TheRestShallPass: ** When you're making your way through the villain's lair in ''Portal Of of Evil'', you can rescue two of his prisoners. If you do, they'll help you fight the villain's bodyguards. Rescue both of them and they'll each take on one of the guards and free you up to take on the villain.

* SchmuckBait: And lots of it. Unguarded treasure chest? Turns out to be a monster. Choice of two candles to light a pitch-black room? The one that stays alight for longer feeds on your blood.
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* SchmuckBait: And lots of it. it. ** Unguarded treasure chest? Turns out to be a monster. Choice of two candles to light a pitch-black room? The one that stays alight for longer feeds on your blood.

** But not always, because sometimes the books try to trick you this way. The original ''Deathtrap Dungeon'' is full of places that play this Trope straight. However, [[spoiler:In one place, a sad-looking ghostly girl recites a poem to you, and later it becomes clear she's urging you to dive into a pool of water at the end of a corridor. While this seems like an obvious attempt to trick you into jumping into a flooded subterranean tunnel with no exit, she's telling the honest to goodness truth. Not only is it safe, but if you don't believe her, you won't find a crucial item you need to win the game.]] * SeaMonster: A few pop up, but the most notable example would be the Kraken from ''Demons of the Deep.'' Either that, or the Abyssal Horror from ''Stormslayer''.
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** But not always, because sometimes the books try to trick you this way. The original ''Deathtrap Dungeon'' is full of places that play this Trope straight. However, [[spoiler:In one place, a sad-looking ghostly girl recites a poem to you, and later it becomes clear she's urging you to dive into a pool of water at the end of a corridor. While this seems like an obvious attempt to trick you into jumping into a flooded subterranean tunnel with no exit, she's telling the honest to goodness honest-to-goodness truth. Not only is it safe, but if you don't believe her, you won't find a crucial item you need to win the game.]] * SeaMonster: A few pop up, but the most notable example would be the Kraken from ''Demons of the Deep.'' Deep''. Either that, or the Abyssal Horror from ''Stormslayer''.

* SequelEpisode ** The very first book, ''The Warlock of Firetop Mountain'', received a follow-up ten years later for the series' 50th release, ''Return to Firetop Mountain''. ''Return'' was itself followed shortly after by ''Legend of Zagor''. ''Legend of Zagor'' itself was also a sequel to a "Puzzle Art Book" called "Casket of Souls", causing a {{crossover}}. (Zagor fusing with the BigBad Demon from that book)
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* SequelEpisode SequelEpisode: ** The very first book, ''The Warlock of Firetop Mountain'', received a follow-up ten years later for the series' 50th release, ''Return to Firetop Mountain''. ''Return'' was itself followed shortly after by ''Legend of Zagor''. ''Legend of Zagor'' itself was also a sequel to a "Puzzle Art Book" called "Casket of Souls", causing a {{crossover}}. {{crossover}} (Zagor fusing with the BigBad Demon from that book)book).

* ShoutOut: Ian Livingstone and his teammates appear as minor [=NPCs=] with real-world names (albeit sometimes spelled phonetically-"Fyll" instead of Phil, "Ndroo" instead of Drew, etc.), and can offer help to the player. Another example is in the more recent ''Eye of The Dragon'', where shopkeeper Thomas Peppercorn is a dead ringer for Livingstone, although he's not a sailor.
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* ShoutOut: ShopliftAndDie: Generally justified that the shopkeeper who forged the items he's selling is a powerful wizard, or the vendor just throws an item of merchandise at you and scoots away. Yaztromo is polite enough to warn you twice before unleashing BalefulPolymorph on you. You later run into to a talking crow who was a theif who had this happen to him... * ShoutOut: ** Ian Livingstone and his teammates appear as minor [=NPCs=] with real-world names (albeit sometimes spelled phonetically-"Fyll" instead of Phil, "Ndroo" instead of Drew, etc.), and can offer help to the player. player. ** Another example is in the more recent ''Eye of The the Dragon'', where shopkeeper Thomas Peppercorn is a dead ringer for Livingstone, although he's not a sailor.

** ''Moonrunner'' contains a ludicrous number of Shout Outs to different horror movies:
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** ''Moonrunner'' contains a ludicrous number of Shout Outs Shout-Outs to different horror movies:

* ShowWithinAShow: In ''Magehunter'', to defeat Mencius, you listen to a story by Al-Haddar, which starts out as a metaphor for your own adventure - Jaddar pursued the evil Abdul Al-Azrad with his magic bow. Abdul escapes, but Jaddar pursues, and en route encounters a man who tells him the story of a prince who befriended an evil wizard. ::In this substory, the wizard was captured but the prince freed him, and the wizard turned him into a lion. The lion prince wandered the land in desolation and eventually came across a genie, who had to kill him. First, however, the genie told the lion prince the story of his brother to explain why he had to kill him. ::The genie's brother was a great genie, but he was killed by his jealous brother. The brother was thrown out of the tower, and when he tried to get in, he found his way blocked by a snake, a lion, and a raven, and he was instructed to kill the most dangerous. ::At this point, the story transitions to second-person choose your own adventure style, but still has Al-Haddar's quotation marks. When the most dangerous animal is dead, the hero is approached by an exile prince who asks for aid - and at this point Al-Haddar stops narrating. * SidequestSidestory: Some of the more ambitious books in the series featured these as opposed to having to follow one incredibly specific path to be able to win, giving you the option of going through them to win items or other benefits that would help in the endgame.
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* ShowWithinAShow: In ''Magehunter'', to defeat Mencius, you listen to a story by Al-Haddar, which starts out as a metaphor for your own adventure - -- Jaddar pursued the evil Abdul Al-Azrad with his magic bow. Abdul escapes, but Jaddar pursues, and en route encounters a man who tells him the story of a prince who befriended an evil wizard. ::In wizard.\\ In this substory, the wizard was captured but the prince freed him, and the wizard turned him into a lion. The lion prince wandered the land in desolation and eventually came across a genie, who had to kill him. First, however, the genie told the lion prince the story of his brother to explain why he had to kill him. ::The him.\\ The genie's brother was a great genie, but he was killed by his jealous brother. The brother was thrown out of the tower, and when he tried to get in, he found his way blocked by a snake, a lion, and a raven, and he was instructed to kill the most dangerous. ::At dangerous.\\ At this point, the story transitions to second-person choose your own adventure style, but still has Al-Haddar's quotation marks. When the most dangerous animal is dead, the hero is approached by an exile prince who asks for aid - -- and at this point Al-Haddar stops narrating. * SidequestSidestory: Some of the more ambitious books in the series featured feature these as opposed to having to follow one incredibly specific path to be able to win, giving you the option of going through them to win items or other benefits that would will help in the endgame.

** Ian Livingstone's books require the player to collect a tonne of items and trinkets, and usually they have to open every door and pick a fight with everyone they meet in order to find them all. *** The markedly different style of ''Legend of Zagor'' created a RunningGag within the fandom that Livingstone had taken the credit for the book from Keith Martin and buried him in his back garden. ** Steve Jackson is more experimental, always trying new ideas and situations. His books often require the player to collect items in order to ''avoid'' hard battles. *** The notorious style shift within the series' very first book ''The Warlock of Firetop Mountain'', frequently registered when its infamous 'maze' section comes up, is a result of Jackson and Livingstone essentially writing half the adventure each and simply jamming the two parts together to create the finished volume.
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** Ian Livingstone's books require the player to collect a tonne ton of items and trinkets, and usually they have to open every door and pick a fight with everyone they meet in order to find them all. *** all. The markedly different style of ''Legend of Zagor'' created a RunningGag within the fandom that Livingstone had taken the credit for the book from Keith Martin and buried him in his back garden. ** Steve Jackson is more experimental, always trying new ideas and situations. His books often require the player to collect items in order to ''avoid'' hard battles. *** battles. The notorious style shift within the series' very first book ''The Warlock of Firetop Mountain'', frequently registered when its infamous 'maze' "maze" section comes up, is a result of Jackson and Livingstone essentially writing half the adventure each and simply jamming the two parts together to create the finished volume.

* SmugSuper: The dog-headed Prefectas from ''Sky Lord'' were an entire race of "perfect warriors." They are defeated by cloning another group of Prefectas who are even more unbelievably arrogant than the first, sparking an EnemyCivilWar.
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* SmugSuper: The dog-headed Prefectas from ''Sky Lord'' were are an entire race of "perfect warriors." warriors". They are defeated by cloning another group of Prefectas who are even more unbelievably arrogant than the first, sparking an EnemyCivilWar.

* SNKBoss: A lot of bosses are super-strong and super-cheap. Special mention for Razak in ''Crypt Of The Sorcerer'': if you even manage to get to him, he has top stats and will kill you instantly if he hits you ''twice in a row''.
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* SNKBoss: A lot of bosses are super-strong and super-cheap. Special mention for Razak in ''Crypt Of The of the Sorcerer'': if you even manage to get to him, he has top stats and will kill you instantly if he hits you ''twice in a row''.

* SomeDayThisWillComeInHandy: As a basic rule for these books, grab everything that's not nailed down. If one of the available items is a claw hammer, ignore the last four words of the previous sentence.
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* SomeDayThisWillComeInHandy: SomeDayThisWillComeInHandy: ** As a basic rule for these books, grab everything that's not nailed down. If one of the available items is a claw hammer, ignore the last four words of the previous sentence.

** There are a few SciFi stories appearing sporadically across the range, although they stopped altogether near the end in favour of the "traditional" adventures in Titan ** ''Freeway Fighter'' takes place in a ''Mad Max''-type near-future society
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** There are a few SciFi stories appearing sporadically across the range, although they stopped altogether near the end in favour of the "traditional" adventures in Titan Titan. ** ''Freeway Fighter'' takes place in a ''Mad Max''-type near-future societysociety.

** ''Black Vein Prophecy'' has none of the usual introduction or rules at all, sending you straight into the first paragraph - you don't roll up your statistics or find out ''anything'' about the adventure at all before starting.
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** ''Black Vein Prophecy'' has none of the usual introduction or rules at all, sending you straight into the first paragraph - -- you don't roll up your statistics or find out ''anything'' about the adventure at all before starting.

* SpikesOfVillainy: A Chaos Champion from ''Trial of Champions'' wears plate armour that is literally covered in spikes. And he wields a spiked mace. ** Practically all Chaos Warriors or Champions in the series sport this look.
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* SpikesOfVillainy: A Chaos Champion from ''Trial of Champions'' wears plate armour armor that is literally covered in spikes. And he wields a spiked mace. ** mace. Practically all Chaos Warriors or Champions in the series sport this look.

* TakeAThirdOption: A ''lot'' of dangerous encounters give you an alternative to fighting, and some even give you an alternative to ''that''. For example, in ''Space Assassin'', there's a place where you have to get by a sentry who won't let you pass unless you answer a riddle. You can actually answer the riddle, which gets you buy without a fight, or you can fight him (''not'' recommended, seeing as he uses a disintegrator, which means he wins the fight if he makes ''one'' successful attack), or you can use options that involve items from your inventory, assuming you have them. (Although one of these options carries a risk of making him angry and forcing you into the fight option.) Note that the first option (answering the riddle) seems to be the proper option, because the challenge in the next room is much harder if you get past him any other way. ** Some of the more ambitious gamebooks hid options from you; the notoriously NintendoHard ''Creature of Havoc'' had several items or options that you weren't prompted to use but you had to deduct or add to a reference number to get a new reference number to use certain items (for example, a pendant that can find secret doors that required you to add 20 to the reference number you were on at the time to use it). Notably, one of these options ''had'' to be used in a section that ends in your death to win the game. ** The spin-off series ''The Cretan Chronicles'' had a system where at certain points you could add 20 to the section number to attempt a nonstandard action. If no such action was available, you were penalized for trying to be ahead of your time.
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* TakeAThirdOption: A ''lot'' of dangerous encounters give you an alternative to fighting, and some even give you an alternative to ''that''. ''that''. ** For example, in ''Space Assassin'', there's a place where you have to get by a sentry who won't let you pass unless you answer a riddle. You can actually answer the riddle, which gets you buy without a fight, or you can fight him (''not'' recommended, seeing as he uses a disintegrator, which means he wins the fight if he makes ''one'' successful attack), or you can use options that involve items from your inventory, assuming you have them. (Although one of these options carries a risk of making him angry and forcing you into the fight option.) Note that the first option (answering the riddle) seems to be the proper option, because the challenge in the next room is much harder if you get past him any other way. ** Some of the more ambitious gamebooks hid options from you; the notoriously NintendoHard ''Creature of Havoc'' had has several items or options that you weren't aren't prompted to use but you had have to deduct or add to a reference number to get a new reference number to use certain items (for example, a pendant that can find secret doors that required requires you to add 20 to the reference number you were are on at the time to use it). Notably, one of these options ''had'' ''have'' to be used in a section that ends in your death to win the game. ** The spin-off series ''The Cretan Chronicles'' had has a system where at certain points you could add canadd 20 to the section number to attempt a nonstandard action. If no such action was is available, you were are penalized for trying to be ahead of your time.

* TreacherousQuestGiver: The TwistEnding to ''Masks of Mayhem''
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* TreacherousQuestGiver: The TwistEnding to ''Masks of Mayhem''Mayhem''.

* TurnsRed: At least one BossBattle did this; if Count Heydrich of ''Vault of the Vampire'' is reduced to 4 Stamina points he will try biting your throat, which will kill you outright if he manages to hit you twice.
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* TurnsRed: At least one BossBattle did does this; if Count Heydrich of ''Vault of the Vampire'' is reduced to 4 Stamina points he will try biting your throat, which will kill you outright if he manages to hit you twice.

* UnwinnableByDesign: In more than a few books if you fail to pick up the right item, 50 pages later you find that you're ''completely'' screwed. ** ''Caverns Of The Snow Witch'': if you roll too low for your initial statistics, half-way through the book, you die. ** Steve Jackson is a big fan of using this as cruelly as possible; ''House of Hell'' and ''Creature of Havoc'' both contain multiple areas with large decision trees but ''every'' path leads to death. Two battles in ''Creature Of Havoc'' are unwinnable, as they will simply restart every time you win (by means of trapping you in an infinite loop of the same three or four sections), until you run out of Stamina. One is a fight against a constantly respawning number of Chaos Warriors, the other is against the undead Quimmel Bone, who will simply reform every time you win.
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* UnwinnableByDesign: UnwinnableByDesign: ** In more than a few books if you fail to pick up the right item, 50 pages later you find that you're ''completely'' screwed. ** ''Caverns Of The of the Snow Witch'': if you roll too low for your initial statistics, half-way through the book, you die. ** Steve Jackson is a big fan of using this as cruelly as possible; ''House of Hell'' and ''Creature of Havoc'' both contain multiple areas with large decision trees but ''every'' path leads to death. Two battles in ''Creature Of of Havoc'' are unwinnable, as they will simply restart every time you win (by means of trapping you in an infinite loop of the same three or four sections), until you run out of Stamina. One is a fight against a constantly respawning number of Chaos Warriors, the other is against the undead Quimmel Bone, who will simply reform every time you win.

* UnwinnableByMistake: In ''The Crimson Tide'', the player starts out as a child with a maximum SKILL score of 6, as opposed to the usual 12. Unfortunately, the editor of the book failed to realise this and increased the maximum SKILL of one of the first monsters you encounter from 6 to 12, thereby making the game more or less completely unwinnable at time of publication (since the error became apparent and the author of the book described the editor as 'an idiot', most people reduce the monster's SKILL score accordingly).
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* UnwinnableByMistake: UnwinnableByMistake: ** In ''The Crimson Tide'', the player starts out as a child with a maximum SKILL score of 6, as opposed to the usual 12. Unfortunately, the editor of the book failed to realise this and increased the maximum SKILL of one of the first monsters you encounter from 6 to 12, thereby making the game more or less completely unwinnable at time of publication (since the error became apparent and the author of the book described the editor as 'an idiot', "an idiot", most people reduce the monster's SKILL score accordingly).

** Another subversion occurs in ''Vault Of The Vampire'' with the CloudCuckooLander Wilhelm Heydrich. If you attack and kill him, you'll suffer a LUCK penalty...but if you catch him in an AxCrazy mood and he attacks you first, you will ''not'' be punished for killing him.
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** Another subversion occurs in ''Vault Of The of the Vampire'' with the CloudCuckooLander Wilhelm Heydrich. If you attack and kill him, you'll suffer a LUCK penalty...but if you catch him in an AxCrazy mood and he attacks you first, you will ''not'' be punished for killing him.

* WeaksauceWeakness: One of the ways you can kill the warlock Baltus Dire in ''Citadel Of Chaos'' is by pulling down the curtain in the room, exposing him to sunlight, which immediatly drains his life and kills him. * WhatHaveIBecome: In ''Portal of Evil,'' the warlord Horfak will undergo a VillainousBreakdown if you reveal his hideously-disfigured features with a mirror. The portal is forced to destroy his mind to bend the former mine-owner to its will; while he will still fight you, he is now just another slave warrior and significantly weaker. * WhatTheHellHero: After your home village is decimated at the start of ''Tower of Destruction'', you can either start clearing away rubble and helping the survivors or you can start gathering up supplies for yourself by basically looting the ruins. Your fellow townsfolk do not appreciate your apparent opportunism. ** You can get a few moments like this from the gamebooks themselves, such as by killing the harmless goblin children in ''Citadel Of Chaos'', or killing the blacksmith in ''City Of Thieves'', the latter of which actually punishes you with a Luck deduction.
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* WeaksauceWeakness: One of the ways you can kill the warlock Baltus Dire in ''Citadel Of of Chaos'' is by pulling down the curtain in the room, exposing him to sunlight, which immediatly drains his life and kills him. * WhatHaveIBecome: In ''Portal of Evil,'' Evil'', the warlord Horfak will undergo a VillainousBreakdown if you reveal his hideously-disfigured features with a mirror. The portal is forced to destroy his mind to bend the former mine-owner to its will; while he will still fight you, he is now just another slave warrior and significantly weaker. * WhatTheHellHero: WhatTheHellHero: ** After your home village is decimated at the start of ''Tower of Destruction'', you can either start clearing away rubble and helping the survivors or you can start gathering up supplies for yourself by basically looting the ruins. Your fellow townsfolk do not appreciate your apparent opportunism. ** You can get a few moments like this from the gamebooks themselves, such as by killing the harmless goblin children in ''Citadel Of of Chaos'', or killing the blacksmith in ''City Of of Thieves'', the latter of which actually punishes you with a Luck deduction.

* WeaksauceWeakness: One AWinnerIsYou: Several of the ways you can kill books have disappointing endings, the warlock Baltus Dire in ''Citadel Of Chaos'' is by pulling down last "reference" being only a few lines long and giving no details on the curtain in the room, exposing him to sunlight, outcome. Particular offenders: ''Space Assassin'', ''The Rings of Kether'', ''Rebel Planet'' and ''Deathmoor''. Even more annoying, ''Masks of Mayhem'', which immediatly drains his life and kills him. * WhatHaveIBecome: In ''Portal of Evil,'' the warlord Horfak will undergo has a VillainousBreakdown if you reveal his hideously-disfigured features with a mirror. The portal is forced two-line ending to destroy his mind to bend the former mine-owner to its will; while he will still fight you, he is now just another slave warrior and significantly weaker. * WhatTheHellHero: After your home village is decimated at the start of ''Tower of Destruction'', you can either start clearing avoid giving away rubble and helping the survivors or you can start gathering up supplies for yourself by basically looting the ruins. Your fellow townsfolk do not appreciate your apparent opportunism. ** You can get a few moments like this from the gamebooks themselves, such as by killing the harmless goblin children in ''Citadel Of Chaos'', or killing the blacksmith in ''City Of Thieves'', the latter of which actually punishes you with a Luck deduction.its TwistEnding.

* WeaksauceWeakness: One of the ways you can kill the warlock Baltus Dire in ''Citadel Of Chaos'' is by pulling down the curtain in the room, exposing him to sunlight, which immediatly drains his life and kills him. * WhatHaveIBecome: In ''Portal of Evil,'' the warlord Horfak will undergo a VillainousBreakdown if you reveal his hideously-disfigured features with a mirror. The portal is forced to destroy his mind to bend the former mine-owner to its will; while he will still fight you, he is now just another slave warrior and significantly weaker. * WhatTheHellHero: After your home village is decimated at the start of ''Tower of Destruction'', you can either start clearing away rubble and helping the survivors or you can start gathering up supplies for yourself by basically looting the ruins. Your fellow townsfolk do not appreciate your apparent opportunism. ** You can get a few moments like this from the gamebooks themselves, such as by killing the harmless goblin children in ''Citadel Of Chaos'', or killing the blacksmith in ''City Of Thieves'', the latter of which actually punishes you with a Luck deduction.

!!The world of Titan contains examples of:
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!!The world of Titan contains provides examples of:

* AllThereInTheManual: ''Titan: The Fighting Fantasy World'', which includes backstories on a lot of the villains and [=NPCs=]. There is also ''Out of the Pit'' which contains game stats and backstories on hundreds of different monsters from the series.
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* AllThereInTheManual: AllThereInTheManual: ** ''Titan: The Fighting Fantasy World'', which includes backstories on a lot of the villains and [=NPCs=]. [=NPCs=]. ** There is also ''Out of the Pit'' which contains game stats and backstories on hundreds of different monsters from the series.

* {{Crystal Dragon Jesus}}: Several books show a somewhat consistent polytheistic pantheon, with different gods even having their own cults and devotional orders (for example, the [[{{Knight in Shining Armour}} Templars]] are devoted to Telak), but the cross is a significant religious symbol.
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* {{Crystal Dragon Jesus}}: CrystalDragonJesus: Several books show a somewhat consistent polytheistic pantheon, with different gods even having their own cults and devotional orders (for example, the [[{{Knight in Shining Armour}} [[KnightInShiningArmour Templars]] are devoted to Telak), but the cross is a significant religious symbol.

* HeroicNeutral: Nicodemus spent most of his life fighting the forces of evil. He eventually became so burned out from the struggle that he retired to Port Blacksand, where almost no one would bother him. While he doesn't typically do much these days (and can become very irritated if he's bothered by adventurers who try to run to him to solve all their problems for them), he will help if the problem is sufficiently big enough.
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* HeroicNeutral: Nicodemus spent most of his life fighting the forces of evil. He eventually became so burned out from the struggle that he retired to Port Blacksand, where almost no one no-one would bother him. While he doesn't typically do much these days (and can become very irritated if he's bothered by adventurers who try to run to him to solve all their problems for them), he will help if the problem is sufficiently big enough.

* OurElvesAreBetter: All Elves know magic. And they're far better at it than humans will ever be, though this verges on being an InformedAbility considering that most Elves you meet and have the option to fight are fairly weak as enemies, and considering the huge number of world threateningly powerful human spellcasters. * OurGnomesAreWeirder: Very much so. Some of them, like the one in ''Forest Of Doom'', are cranky magic-using eccentrics who just want to be left alone, but the gnome you can meet in the ''[[Literature/{{Sorcery}} Crown of Kings]]'' series will sell you out to the guards of Mampang if he recognizes you.
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* OurElvesAreBetter: All Elves know magic. And they're far better at it than humans will ever be, though this verges on being an InformedAbility considering that most Elves you meet and have the option to fight are fairly weak as enemies, and considering the huge number of world threateningly world-threateningly powerful human spellcasters. * OurGnomesAreWeirder: Very much so. Some of them, like the one in ''Forest Of of Doom'', are cranky magic-using eccentrics who just want to be left alone, but the gnome you can meet in the ''[[Literature/{{Sorcery}} Crown of Kings]]'' series will sell you out to the guards of Mampang if he recognizes you.

* OurWerewolvesAreDifferent: FF werewolves can be killed with normal weapons, but silver weapons are still your best bet [[spoiler: Which you unfortunately have the chance to discover for yourself in the one book that has silver bullets]]
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* OurWerewolvesAreDifferent: FF werewolves can be killed with normal weapons, but silver weapons are still your best bet [[spoiler: Which bet. [[spoiler:Which you unfortunately have the chance to discover for yourself in the one book that has silver bullets]]bullets.]]

* {{Retcon}}: Zagor, the Warlock of Firetop Mountain has at least two very different backstories portraying him as either a brooding but not especially evil hermit, a more evil but still human would-be- EvilOverlord. Three negates any of this and fuses him with the antagonist demon from ''Casket of Souls'' from Puzzle Quest Books.
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* {{Retcon}}: Zagor, the Warlock of Firetop Mountain has at least two very different backstories portraying him as either a brooding but not especially evil hermit, a more evil but still human would-be- EvilOverlord.would-be-EvilOverlord. Three negates any of this and fuses him with the antagonist demon from ''Casket of Souls'' from Puzzle Quest Books.

* ShopliftAndDie: Generally justified that the shopkeeper who forged the items he's selling is a powerful wizard, or the vendor just throws an item of merchandise at you and scoots away. Yaztromo is polite enough to warn you twice before unleashing BalefulPolymorph on you. You later run into to a talking crow who was a theif who had this happen to him...

* TakeOurWordForIt: The Shamutanti Hills are supposedly as wild and full of evil as the rest of Kakhabad. There ''are'' monsters and plenty of dangerous humans in the wilderness but the villages you pass through are harmless, or even friendly. Birritanti, the largest is downright pleasant seeming. * {{Uberwald}}: parts of ''Legend Of the Shadow Warriors'', and ''Moonrunner'' contains a simply ridiculous number of Expies and Shout Outs to every well-known horror movie imaginable, of every era and sub-genre, including the Uberwald classics. Also ''Vault of the Vampire'' and its sequels.
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* TakeOurWordForIt: The Shamutanti Hills are supposedly as wild and full of evil as the rest of Kakhabad. There ''are'' monsters and plenty of dangerous humans in the wilderness wilderness, but the villages you pass through are harmless, or even friendly. Birritanti, the largest largest, is downright pleasant seeming. pleasant-seeming. * {{Uberwald}}: parts Parts of ''Legend Of of the Shadow Warriors'', and ''Moonrunner'' contains a simply ridiculous number of Expies and Shout Outs to every well-known horror movie imaginable, of every era and sub-genre, including the Uberwald classics. Also ''Vault of the Vampire'' and its sequels.

* WithGreatPowerComesGreatInsanity: The Minimites, a race of pixie-like creatures who had tremendous magical abilities, joined with a number of human wizards in a powerful magical ritual to destroy the forces of evil threatening the Old World during the War of the Wizards. They succeeded, and the Old World was spared the destruction suffered by Allansia and Khul, but many of the Minimites were so overwhelmed by the power they wielded that they thought they could become the benevolent leaders of the world.\\ \\ Other Minimites realized that this was simple tyranny, so they deliberately nerfed themselves so that most magic wouldn't even work in their presence and they could not stay in close contact with one another.
to:
* WithGreatPowerComesGreatInsanity: The Minimites, a race of pixie-like creatures who had tremendous magical abilities, joined with a number of human wizards in a powerful magical ritual to destroy the forces of evil threatening the Old World during the War of the Wizards. They succeeded, and the Old World was spared the destruction suffered by Allansia and Khul, but many of the Minimites were so overwhelmed by the power they wielded that they thought they could become the benevolent leaders of the world.\\ \\ Other Minimites realized that this was simple tyranny, so they deliberately nerfed themselves so that most magic wouldn't even work in their presence and they could not stay in close contact with one another.
30th Jan '16 3:56:03 PM LondonKdS
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*** The main enemy is a Franchise/FuManchu CaptainErsatz.
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*** The main enemy is a Franchise/FuManchu CaptainErsatz.CaptainErsatz (with a definite dash of [[Recap/DoctorWhoS14E6TheTalonsOfWengChiang Magnus Greel]]).
28th Jan '16 6:48:16 AM RossN
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Added DiffLines:
The series now has a CharacterSheet under construction [[Characters/FightingFantasy here]].
8th Jan '16 10:01:59 AM Berrenta
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* NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished: Trying to help a fellow GalleySlave at the start of ''Masters of Chaos'' just gets ''you'' whipped instead.
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* NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished: Trying to help a fellow GalleySlave galley slave at the start of ''Masters of Chaos'' just gets ''you'' whipped instead.
8th Jan '16 9:58:52 AM Berrenta
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* GalleySlave: You get to start ''Master of Chaos'' by going undercover as one. Played straight in ''Trial of Champions''.

* {{Show Within a Show}}: In ''Magehunter'', to defeat Mencius, you listen to a story by Al-Haddar, which starts out as a metaphor for your own adventure - Jaddar pursued the evil Abdul Al-Azrad with his magic bow. Abdul escapes, but Jaddar pursues, and en route encounters a man who tells him the story of a prince who befriended an evil wizard.
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* {{Show Within a Show}}: ShowWithinAShow: In ''Magehunter'', to defeat Mencius, you listen to a story by Al-Haddar, which starts out as a metaphor for your own adventure - Jaddar pursued the evil Abdul Al-Azrad with his magic bow. Abdul escapes, but Jaddar pursues, and en route encounters a man who tells him the story of a prince who befriended an evil wizard.

* Main/{{Sidequest}}/SidequestSidestory: Some of the more ambitious books in the series featured these as opposed to having to follow one incredibly specific path to be able to win, giving you the option of going through them to win items or other benefits that would help in the endgame.
to:
* Main/{{Sidequest}}/SidequestSidestory: SidequestSidestory: Some of the more ambitious books in the series featured these as opposed to having to follow one incredibly specific path to be able to win, giving you the option of going through them to win items or other benefits that would help in the endgame.

Added DiffLines:
* Main/{{Sidequest}}/SidequestSidestory: Some SlaveGalley: You get to start ''Master of the more ambitious books in the series featured these as opposed to having to follow one incredibly specific path to be able to win, giving you the option of Chaos'' by going through them to win items or other benefits that would help undercover as a galley slave. Played straight in the endgame.''Trial of Champions''.
4th Jan '16 1:24:11 AM CornwindEvilman
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** One of the big evil empires in Titan is the desert-dwelling (but expanding) Snake Man empire, who were created when one of the lesser gods of evil collected a variety of human and snake specimens and blended them together. Unusually for a god, there were a 'a great many horrific mistakes, on which it is better not to dwell', before said god actually got the species they wanted.
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** One of the big evil empires in on Titan is the desert-dwelling (but expanding) Snake Man empire, who were created when one of the lesser gods of evil collected a variety of human and snake specimens and blended them together. Unusually for a god, there were a '' 'a great many horrific mistakes, on which it is better not to dwell', dwell' '', before said god actually got managed to create the species they wanted.
4th Jan '16 1:22:19 AM CornwindEvilman
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Added DiffLines:
** One of the big evil empires in Titan is the desert-dwelling (but expanding) Snake Man empire, who were created when one of the lesser gods of evil collected a variety of human and snake specimens and blended them together. Unusually for a god, there were a 'a great many horrific mistakes, on which it is better not to dwell', before said god actually got the species they wanted.
15th Dec '15 9:16:55 AM LondonKdS
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*** One section of the book creates a unique type of "[[ZombieApocalypse Plague Zombie]]", (in contrast to the franchise's usual depiction of the Voodoo Zombie in order to do a Film/LivingDeadSeries homage.
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*** One section of the book creates a unique type of "[[ZombieApocalypse Plague Zombie]]", (in contrast to the franchise's usual depiction of the Voodoo Zombie VoodooZombie) in order to do a Film/LivingDeadSeries homage.
15th Dec '15 9:16:00 AM LondonKdS
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* SecretTestOfThievingSkill: The whole plot of ''Midnight Rogue'' turns out to be set up as your character's final exam from the Thieves' Guild.

** In the illustrations for ''Legend of the Shadow Warriors'', the titular bad guys look exactly like the Golden Vampires in the Film/HammerHorror[=/=]Shaw Brothers crossover oddity ''Film/TheLegendOfTheSevenGoldenVampires''.
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** In the illustrations for ''Legend of the Shadow Warriors'', the titular bad guys look exactly like the Golden Vampires in the Film/HammerHorror[=/=]Shaw Brothers crossover oddity ''Film/TheLegendOfTheSevenGoldenVampires''.''Film/TheLegendOfThe7GoldenVampires''.

*** Conrad Zaar is [[Franchise/FridayTheThirteenth Jason Voorhees]].
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*** Conrad Zaar is [[Franchise/FridayTheThirteenth [[Franchise/FridayThe13th Jason Voorhees]].

*** The Corpsemaster is ThePhantomOfTheOpera with the personality and appearance of [[Franchise/NightmareOnElmStreet Freddie Krueger]].
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*** The Corpsemaster is ThePhantomOfTheOpera with the personality and appearance of [[Franchise/NightmareOnElmStreet [[Franchise/ANightmareOnElmStreet Freddie Krueger]].
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