History Literature / ErastFandorin

27th Mar '17 7:14:58 AM jamespolk
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Added DiffLines:

Live-action adaptations of Fandorin novels include a Russian TV adaptation of ''The Winter Queen'' and Russian film adaptations of ''Film/TheTurkishGambit'' and ''The State Councillor''. No English-language live-action Fandorin adaptation has ever been made; an English adaptation of ''The Winter Queen'' languished in DevelopmentHell for many years.
26th Mar '17 2:19:55 PM jamespolk
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* DashedPlotLine:
** The first half of part two of ''The Death of Achilles'' describes Achimas' life until his Moscow assignment, jumping many years between significant events in his youth, his turn to crime, and major assassination missions.
** Also, the series as a whole, which follows Fandorin at the key points of his career and life.

to:

* DashedPlotLine:
**
TheDandy: Fandorin is always very well turned out, dressing fashionably, with a neatly waxed mustache. The corset he's wearing in the first half of part two of ''The Death of Achilles'' describes Achimas' life until book saves his Moscow assignment, jumping many years between significant events in his youth, his turn to crime, and major assassination missions.
** Also, the
life.
* DashedPlotLine: The
series as a whole, which follows Fandorin at the key points of his career and life.
25th Mar '17 7:42:56 PM jamespolk
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* BadGuyBar: The Katorga Tavern in the ''Death of Achilles''.



* TheBookCipher: Used by the German spy in ''The Death of Achilles''.



* CallForward:
** In ''The Death of Achilles'', Achimas muses how OutWithABang would be acceptable for a French leader but dishonorable for a Russian one. Fast-forward 17 years later, to the death of French president Félix Faure...
** "....There are already too many empires in the world--any minute now [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI they will all start wrangling with each other]]." Doronin in ''The Diamond Chariot''. He also foresees the collapse of those empires, as well as Japan's expansion into continental Asia and confrontation with Russia.

to:

* CallForward:
** In ''The Death of Achilles'', Achimas muses how OutWithABang would be acceptable for a French leader but dishonorable for a Russian one. Fast-forward 17 years later, to the death of French president Félix Faure...
**
CallForward: "....There are already too many empires in the world--any minute now [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI they will all start wrangling with each other]]." Doronin in ''The Diamond Chariot''. He also foresees the collapse of those empires, as well as Japan's expansion into continental Asia and confrontation with Russia.



* TheChessmaster: Marie Sanfon in 'Murder on the Leviathan'.



* CultureClash:
** Between the Japanese and the Europeans (including Russians).
** Also, in ''The Death of Achilles'', between Anabaptist German refugees and Muslim Chechen natives.

to:

* CultureClash:
**
CultureClash: Between the Japanese and the Europeans (including Russians).
** Also, in ''The Death of Achilles'', between Anabaptist German refugees and Muslim Chechen natives.
Russians).



* DeceasedFallGuyGambit The background of Achimas Welde from includes him being promised a million if he manages to save a SpoiledBrat from the noose. The case is clear-cut, with several bodies of little girls murdered in a NightmareFuel fashion found in the guy's basement. Achimas manages to arrange for the blame to be shifted onto the guy who reported the bodies, who, suspiciously, is nowhere to be found (of course he isn't. Achimas is no SpoiledBrat, and therefore isn't sloppy with hiding corpses).



* GovernmentConspiracy:
** [[spoiler:The clients behind General Sobolev's murder in ''The Death of Achilles'', who thus prevented him from starting a coup d'état.]]
** Also in [[spoiler:''The State Counsellor'', when Fandorin approaches the new Governor-General of Moscow (and relative of the Tsar) with evidence of Pozharsky's crimes, only to find the Governor was well aware of everything he did]].

to:

* GovernmentConspiracy:
** [[spoiler:The clients behind General Sobolev's murder in ''The Death of Achilles'', who thus prevented him from starting a coup d'état.]]
** Also
GovernmentConspiracy: in [[spoiler:''The State Counsellor'', when Fandorin approaches the new Governor-General of Moscow (and relative of the Tsar) with evidence of Pozharsky's crimes, only to find the Governor was well aware of everything he did]].



* OutWithABang: {{Invoked| Trope}} and {{Exploited| Trope}} in ''The Death of Achilles'' [[spoiler:with Achimas' intricate murder of General Sobolev]].



* ProfessionalKiller: Achimas Welde in ''The Death of Achilles''.



* SwitchingPOV:
** ''The Death of Achilles'' is divided into two parts. The first part is Fandorin's investigation (using Fandorin as the POV character, for the first time since ''The Winter Queen''). The second part is from Achimas's (the villain's) POV, in which we learn his life story and then [[PerspectiveFlip go through the events of the first part from his POV]]. Then there's a climactic chapter that switches back and forth between Fandorin and Achimas's POV as they have their confrontation.
** In the first (1905) part of ''The Diamond Chariot'' the POV switches back and forth between Fandorin and the Japanese spy he's chasing. Also happens in the second (1878) part, see ADeathInTheLimelight above.

to:

* SwitchingPOV:
** ''The Death of Achilles'' is divided into two parts. The first part is Fandorin's investigation (using Fandorin as the POV character, for the first time since ''The Winter Queen''). The second part is from Achimas's (the villain's) POV, in which we learn his life story and then [[PerspectiveFlip go through the events of the first part from his POV]]. Then there's a climactic chapter that switches back and forth between Fandorin and Achimas's POV as they have their confrontation.
**
SwitchingPOV: In the first (1905) part of ''The Diamond Chariot'' the POV switches back and forth between Fandorin and the Japanese spy he's chasing. Also happens in the second (1878) part, see ADeathInTheLimelight above.



* WholeEpisodeFlashback: Used in Part II of ''The Death of Achilles'', in which the life history and criminal career of the antagonist is recounted. This may be a nod to Literature/SherlockHolmes novels, which often used this trope.
25th Mar '17 5:59:54 PM jamespolk
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to:

* ''Literature/TheDeathOfAchilles''
23rd Mar '17 10:29:24 PM jamespolk
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* UndesirablePrize: Fandorin won a huge ugly wooden clock that won't fit into his room in a lottery, much to his own horror. [[spoiler: [[ChekhovsGun It saved his life.]]]]
* UnreliableNarrator: several in ''Murder on the Leviathan'' (not quite narrators in 3 out 5 cases, but the perspective shifts to them and the unreliability is there), but especially [[ThroughTheEyesOfMadness Lord Milford-Stokes]].
23rd Mar '17 10:24:54 PM jamespolk
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* GoodbyeCruelWorld: The villain's confession in ''Murder on the Leviathan'' [[spoiler: seems to be this at first]].



* IfICantHaveYou:
** When the passengers in ''Murder on the Leviathan'' start fighting over the Indian shawl MacGuffin ([[spoiler:which is actually a map showing the location of a treasure valuable enough to double the size of the Royal Navy, pay for a French revanche against Germany, or wipe out Russia's foreign debts]]) it's heavily implied that Fandorin deliberately let it blow out of the window to be lost at sea.
** A straighter example can be found in the latest book, ''All the World's a Stage'', where [[spoiler:the villain realizes that he cannot win the love and respect of the woman he is obsessed with and decides to kill her and everyone else in her actor troupe in a suicide bombing]].

to:

* IfICantHaveYou:
** When the passengers in ''Murder on the Leviathan'' start fighting over the Indian shawl MacGuffin ([[spoiler:which is actually a map showing the location of a treasure valuable enough to double the size of the Royal Navy, pay for a French revanche against Germany, or wipe out Russia's foreign debts]]) it's heavily implied that Fandorin deliberately let it blow out of the window to be lost at sea.
** A straighter example can be found in the latest book, ''All
IfICantHaveYou:''All the World's a Stage'', where [[spoiler:the villain realizes that he cannot win the love and respect of the woman he is obsessed with and decides to kill her and everyone else in her actor troupe in a suicide bombing]].



* MacGuffin: [[spoiler: The Indian shawl]] in ''Murder on the Leviathan''.



* TheManBehindTheMan: [[spoiler: Marie Sanfon behind Lieutenant Renier]] in ''Murder on the Leviathan''.



* NobleBigotWithABadge: Gustave Gauche, [[spoiler: though the 'noble' part failed to stand up to the test in the end]].
* ObfuscatingStupidity: [[spoiler:"Renata Kleber"]] in ''Murder on the Leviathan''.



** ''Murder on the Leviathan'' cycles through several different POV characters.



* TenLittleMurderVictims: A variation: the French detective in ''Murder on the Leviathan'' was sure that the murderer he was chasing after was somewhere on the large ship, and made sure to have his primary suspects assigned to the same salon to keep an eye on them. Then played straight when ''one of those suspects'' was killed too.
23rd Mar '17 10:03:53 PM jamespolk
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* BigSecret: half the characters in ''Murder on the Leviathan'' either have this or seem like it (which is enough to throw off the investigation).
* BittersweetEnding:
** In ''Murder on the Leviathan'' several of the main protagonists end up dead, one is gravely wounded, not counting ten victims of the murder that sets the whole plot in motion. The perpetrator is captured [[spoiler: but the plan was so meticulous that the mastermind is supposed to get off with a short prison term]], also, the goal of the perpetrator, [[spoiler: a fortune in gems]] is possibly lost forever.
** In ''Decorator'', Fandorin manages to catch the extremely dangerous deranged serial killer (who happens to be [[spoiler:UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper himself]]) and then [[spoiler:executes him]] but is left by his lover, who says she cannot live with [[spoiler:a man who can kill defenseless captive]], even though she understands it was necessary. Also [[spoiler:Anisiy Tulipov and his sister]] are murdered by the killer.

to:

* BigSecret: half the characters in ''Murder on the Leviathan'' either have this or seem like it (which is enough to throw off the investigation).
* BittersweetEnding:
** In ''Murder on the Leviathan'' several of the main protagonists end up dead, one is gravely wounded, not counting ten victims of the murder that sets the whole plot in motion. The perpetrator is captured [[spoiler: but the plan was so meticulous that the mastermind is supposed to get off with a short prison term]], also, the goal of the perpetrator, [[spoiler: a fortune in gems]] is possibly lost forever.
**
BittersweetEnding: In ''Decorator'', Fandorin manages to catch the extremely dangerous deranged serial killer (who happens to be [[spoiler:UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper himself]]) and then [[spoiler:executes him]] but is left by his lover, who says she cannot live with [[spoiler:a man who can kill defenseless captive]], even though she understands it was necessary. Also [[spoiler:Anisiy Tulipov and his sister]] are murdered by the killer.



* CannotSpitItOut: Gintaro Aono in ''Murder on the Leviathan'', about [[spoiler: him being a doctor and his missing scalpel]]. This got him arrested, [[spoiler: though he was released pretty quickly thanks to Fandorin's intervention]].



* DeadAllAlong: Though never confirmed due to lack of OmniscientNarrator, it is heavily implied that [[spoiler:Emily]], recipient of [[spoiler:letters written by Reginald Milford-Stokes]] from ''Murder on the Leviathan'' is actually dead. There are several clues related to this death before the denouement.



* FemmeFatale: Marie Sanfon in ''Murder on the Leviathan''. [[spoiler: Dr.Lind, anyone?]]

to:

* FemmeFatale: Marie Sanfon in ''Murder on the Leviathan''. [[spoiler: Dr.Lind, anyone?]]



* FrenchJerk: Gustave Gauche.
* FreudianExcuse: Lampshaded by Gustave Gauche and used by [[spoiler:Renier]] in ''Murder on the Leviathan''.



* FunnyForeigner: Gintaro Aono in ''Murder on the Leviathan'' seems to be this, partly because of his ludicrous accent; it's handily subverted in the parts of the novel that are written from ''his'' point of view, though. Also lampshaded, as he realizes that he can use his status of FunnyForeigner (a 'wild Asian' as he puts it) to appear in his loose and light traditional Japanese garb, much better suited to the scorching heat than woolen European suits all other upper-class men are obliged to wear.
23rd Mar '17 9:40:58 PM jamespolk
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to:

* ''Literature/MurderOnTheLeviathan''
22nd Mar '17 11:53:12 PM jamespolk
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* AnachronicOrder: The entire series. The first 9 1/2 novels track Fandorin's life from 1876 to 1905--but Part II of ''The Diamond Chariot'' leaps back to 1878. The next book, ''Jade Rosary Beads'', fills in Fandorin's adventures in the 1880s. Then with ''All the World's a Stage'' Akunin jumps forward to 1911 to pick up the progress of Fandorin's life again.

to:

* AnachronicOrder: The entire series. The first 9 1/2 novels track Fandorin's life from 1876 to 1905--but Part II of ''The Diamond Chariot'' leaps back to 1878. The next book, ''Jade Rosary Beads'', fills in Fandorin's adventures in the 1880s. Then with ''All the World's a Stage'' Akunin jumps forward to 1911 to pick up the progress of Fandorin's life again. Then after ''The Black City'' takes Fandorin to 1914, the three novellas of ''Planet Water'' fill in some more of his adventures 1902-1912.



** Akunin does this on occasion deliberately, for humorous effect. ''The Winter Queen'' has Fandorin using a telephone in Moscow in 1876--the same year that the telephone was being invented in the United States.

to:

** Akunin does this on occasion deliberately, for humorous effect. ''The Winter Queen'' has Fandorin a character using a telephone in Moscow in 1876--the same year that the telephone was being invented in the United States.
22nd Mar '17 6:42:13 PM jamespolk
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** Fandorin's victories seldom come without a price. Also, in a more specific example, [[spoiler:in ''The Turkish Gambit'', Fandorin manages to stop the villain's EvilPlan before its final and most disastrous (for the Russians) stage could commence, the villain ends up shooting himself, and the war is won, but it is very much a PyrrhicVictory, lots of [[RedShirtArmy soldiers]] and several characters are dead, and Fandorin himself [[ButNowIMustGo leaves for Japan]]]].



* TheCavalry: A literal example in ''The Turkish Gambit'': Sobolev's UsefulNotes/{{cossacks}} arrive to rescue Fandorin and Varvara from the Bashi-bazouks.



* CompletelyDifferentTitle: The original Russian title of ''The Winter Queen'' is ''Azazel'', a reference to the secret society at the center of the mystery. The English title is a random reference to a hotel Fandorin stays at.



* DubNameChange: Charles d'Hevrais became Charles ''Paladin'' in Bromfield's translation of ''The Turkish Gambit'' (justified because [[spoiler:"d'Hevrais" (French "from Hevrais") is a huge giveaway of Charles' real identity, namely, Anwar Effendi (born in the town of Hevrais); it works well in Russian because the Cyrillic spelling of "d'Hevrais" and "Hevrais" are almost nothing alike but in English, it would be a ruinous spoiler]]). Later, Anisiy Tulpanov became Anisiy ''Tulipov'' (because "tulpan" is Russian for "tulip" and Anisiy's family is explained to have been named after that flower).

to:

* DubNameChange: Charles d'Hevrais became Charles ''Paladin'' in Bromfield's translation of ''The Turkish Gambit'' (justified because [[spoiler:"d'Hevrais" (French "from Hevrais") is a huge giveaway of Charles' real identity, namely, Anwar Effendi (born in the town of Hevrais); it works well in Russian because the Cyrillic spelling of "d'Hevrais" and "Hevrais" are almost nothing alike but in English, it would be a ruinous spoiler]]). Later, Anisiy Tulpanov became Anisiy ''Tulipov'' (because "tulpan" is Russian for "tulip" and Anisiy's family is explained to have been named after that flower).



* {{Jerkass}}: Colonel Lukan in ''The Turkish Gambit''



* MadScientist: Doctor Blank in ''The Winter Queen''.



* MrFanservice: D'Hevrais in ''The Turkish Gambit''
* MyCountryRightOrWrong: Fandorin himself has this to some extent, as do some other characters otherwise critical of the Tsar's government and policies. On the other hand, averted with [[spoiler:Anwar Effendi, the Ottoman super-spy, who is perfectly willing to sacrifice his own country for sake of stopping autocratic Russia and winning time for the liberal powers of the West]].

to:

* MrFanservice: D'Hevrais in ''The Turkish Gambit''
* MyCountryRightOrWrong: Fandorin himself has this to some extent, as do some other characters otherwise critical of the Tsar's government and policies. On the other hand, averted with [[spoiler:Anwar Effendi, the Ottoman super-spy, who is perfectly willing to sacrifice his own country for sake of stopping autocratic Russia and winning time for the liberal powers of the West]].



* NotSoDifferent: Fandorin and Anwar Effendi.



* OfficerAndAGentleman: Several in ''The Turkish Gambit'', but especially Sobolev.



* SpyDrama: ''The Turkish Gambit'', ''The Diamond Chariot''.

to:

* SpyDrama: ''The Turkish Gambit'', ''The Diamond Chariot''.



* StressVomit: Subverted in ''The Turkish Gambit'', when Varya throws up after spending days bandaging the wounded and, to top it off, learning that her fiance attempted suicide. She thinks that it's just stress but it turns out that she contracted typhoid fever, putting her out of commission for weeks.



** Lady Astair, the BigBad from the first novel, is certainly this.
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