History Literature / ErastFandorin

8th May '18 12:58:32 PM Wint
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* ThereIsNoKillLikeOverkill: In the novel ''It's Not A Goodbye'', the main antagonist plants 180 pounds of dynamite to completely and utterly destroy [[spoiler: Fandorin himself.]] Sadly, it works.
26th Jan '18 6:15:14 PM jamespolk
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The books were written by Boris Akunin (his real name is Grigory Shalvovich Chkhartishvili but it's [[{{Gesundheit}} too difficult to pronounce]]) and noted for their eloquent writing style, remarkable characters, intelligent mysteries, and countless references to Russian history and literature. Every book in the series belongs to a different subgenre of detective mystery (GovernmentConspiracy, SpyDrama, ProfessionalKiller mystery, etc.). English translations were published for every novel through Fandorin #10, ''The Diamond Chariot''.[[note]]After a six-year gap a translation for Fandorin #12, ''All The World's a Stage'' has been announced for the fall of 2017; ''Jade Rosary Beads'' is apparently getting skipped[[/note]] Akunin has also written several novels set in the present day and starring Fandorin's grandson Nicholas Fandorin.

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The books were written by Boris Akunin (his real name is Grigory Shalvovich Chkhartishvili but it's [[{{Gesundheit}} too difficult to pronounce]]) and noted for their eloquent writing style, remarkable characters, intelligent mysteries, and countless references to Russian history and literature. Every book in the series belongs to a different subgenre of detective mystery (GovernmentConspiracy, SpyDrama, ProfessionalKiller mystery, etc.). English translations were published for every novel through Fandorin #10, ''The Diamond Chariot''.[[note]]After a six-year gap a translation for Chariot'', as well as Fandorin #12, ''All The the World's a Stage'' has been announced for the fall of 2017; Stage''. Fandorin #11, ''Jade Rosary Beads'' is apparently getting skipped[[/note]] Beads'', was skipped.

Akunin has also written several novels set in the present day and starring Fandorin's grandson Nicholas Fandorin.
Fandorin, as well as an original Erast Fandorin stage play, ''Yin/Yang''.
25th Jan '18 4:46:12 AM jamespolk
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* ''Literature/AllTheWorldsAStage''
16th May '17 9:28:12 AM nombretomado
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Erast Fandorin is the eponymous protagonist of a highly popular Russian HistoricalDetectiveFiction series set in the 19th century. He starts off as a regular police clerk in Moscow in 1876 and eventually becomes a GreatDetective of international renown, on one occasion employed even by the {{Tsar|istRussia}} himself. Early in his career, he exiles himself to Japan, learns the ways of the {{ninja}}s, and returns even more badass than before. Later in his life, he becomes a technology {{geek}} (while retaining his badassitude, of course) with a special fondness for {{Cool Car}}s.

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Erast Fandorin is the eponymous protagonist of a highly popular Russian HistoricalDetectiveFiction series set in the 19th century. He starts off as a regular police clerk in Moscow in 1876 and eventually becomes a GreatDetective of international renown, on one occasion employed even by the {{Tsar|istRussia}} UsefulNotes/{{Tsar|istRussia}} himself. Early in his career, he exiles himself to Japan, learns the ways of the {{ninja}}s, and returns even more badass than before. Later in his life, he becomes a technology {{geek}} (while retaining his badassitude, of course) with a special fondness for {{Cool Car}}s.
20th Apr '17 8:57:28 PM jamespolk
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* CallForward: "....There are already too many empires in the world--any minute now [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI they will all start wrangling with each other]]." Doronin in ''The Diamond Chariot''. He also foresees the collapse of those empires, as well as Japan's expansion into continental Asia and confrontation with Russia.



* ItWillNeverCatchOn: In the second (1878) part of ''The Diamond Chariot'', Fandorin regards the notion that Japan could transform itself into a great power in thirty years as "simply laughable".
18th Apr '17 11:36:14 AM jamespolk
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* CallBack: Many, throughout the series, to earlier novels. One example: ''The Diamond Chariot'' has a character randomly quote a newspaper, which states that Commodore Endlung and State Counsellor Zuikin are among the dead at Tsushima. Endlung and Zuikin were characters from ''The Coronation'', with Zuikin the Romanov butler being the narrator of that novel. In ''The Coronation'' Endlung recommends that Zuikin leave Romanov service and join the navy.
17th Apr '17 5:34:59 PM jamespolk
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* CentralTheme: A series of detective novels set in Russia from 1876 to 1914. The Central Theme, of course, is the decline and fall of UsefulNotes/TsaristRussia. This is underlined right off the bat in ''The Winter Queen'', when Lady Astair talks about the violent and destructive ways that change might manifest if it isn't managed. In ''The Turkish Gambit'', the BigBad says that Russia is dangerous and primitive and will do great damage to the world if it isn't contained. Sobolev's mistress in ''The Death of Achilles'' says that what Russia needs isn't the Dardanelles, it's enlightenment and a constitution; meanwhle Sobolev and his faction represent the pan-Slav militarism that eventually leads Russia to disaster in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. ''The State Counsellor'' has a friend of Fandorin musing about how the government should stand up for the workers, and guarantee them basic rights like an eight-hour day and decent living conditions, and how if the government fails, the workers will go over to the revolutionaries. ''The Coronation'' portrays a decayed, decadent Romanov family headed by a weak and spineless monarch, Nicholas II. ''The Diamond Chariot'' finds Russia embroiled in a pointless war with Japan, which Russia is losing; the book opens on the day that news of the disaster at Tsushima is filtering back.

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* CentralTheme: A series of detective novels set in Russia from 1876 to 1914. The Central Theme, of course, is the decline and fall of UsefulNotes/TsaristRussia. This is underlined right off the bat in ''The Winter Queen'', when Lady Astair talks about the violent and destructive ways that change might manifest if it isn't managed. In ''The Turkish Gambit'', the BigBad says that Russia is dangerous and primitive and will do great damage to the world if it isn't contained. Sobolev's mistress in ''The Death of Achilles'' says that what Russia needs isn't the Dardanelles, it's enlightenment and a constitution; meanwhle Sobolev and his faction represent the pan-Slav militarism that eventually leads Russia to disaster in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. ''The State Counsellor'' has a friend of Fandorin musing about how the government should stand up for the workers, and guarantee them basic rights like an eight-hour day and decent living conditions, and how if the government fails, the workers will go over to the revolutionaries. ''The Coronation'' portrays a decayed, decadent Romanov family headed by a weak and spineless monarch, Nicholas II. ''The Diamond Chariot'' finds Russia embroiled in a pointless war with Japan, which Russia is losing; the book opens on with the day word of a disastrous naval defeat at Tsushima. A worried Fandorin muses that news of the disaster at Tsushima is filtering back."Russia was seriously ill, running a high fever," while "[[UsefulNotes/RedOctober a deadly tumor was burgeoning]]" inside.
17th Apr '17 3:27:51 PM jamespolk
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* CentralTheme: A series of detective novels set in Russia from 1876 to 1914. The Central Theme, of course, is the decline and fall of UsefulNotes/TsaristRussia. This is underlined right off the bat in ''The Winter Queen'', when Lady Astair talks about the violent and destructive ways that change might manifest if it isn't managed. In ''The Turkish Gambit'', the BigBad says that Russia is dangerous and primitive and will do great damage to the world if it isn't contained. Sobolev's mistress in ''The Death of Achilles'' says that what Russia needs isn't the Dardanelles, it's enlightenment and a constitution; meanwhle Sobolev and his faction represent the pan-Slav militarism that eventually leads Russia to disaster in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. ''The State Counsellor'' has a friend of Fandorin musing about how the government should stand up for the workers, and guarantee them basic rights like an eight-hour day and decent living conditions, and how if the government fails, the workers will go over to the revolutionaries. ''The Coronation'' portrays a decayed, decadent Romanov family headed by a weak and spineless monarch, Nicholas II.

to:

* CentralTheme: A series of detective novels set in Russia from 1876 to 1914. The Central Theme, of course, is the decline and fall of UsefulNotes/TsaristRussia. This is underlined right off the bat in ''The Winter Queen'', when Lady Astair talks about the violent and destructive ways that change might manifest if it isn't managed. In ''The Turkish Gambit'', the BigBad says that Russia is dangerous and primitive and will do great damage to the world if it isn't contained. Sobolev's mistress in ''The Death of Achilles'' says that what Russia needs isn't the Dardanelles, it's enlightenment and a constitution; meanwhle Sobolev and his faction represent the pan-Slav militarism that eventually leads Russia to disaster in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. ''The State Counsellor'' has a friend of Fandorin musing about how the government should stand up for the workers, and guarantee them basic rights like an eight-hour day and decent living conditions, and how if the government fails, the workers will go over to the revolutionaries. ''The Coronation'' portrays a decayed, decadent Romanov family headed by a weak and spineless monarch, Nicholas II. ''The Diamond Chariot'' finds Russia embroiled in a pointless war with Japan, which Russia is losing; the book opens on the day that news of the disaster at Tsushima is filtering back.



* EyeRemember: In ''He Lover of Death'', a serial killer punctured eyes of his victims to defy this trope. Fandorin told the cop that it is a superstition. [[spoiler:Then Fandorin understood that the cop is the killer because he stopped to puncture the eyes.]]



* ShoutOut: At least several phrases and mannerisms used by Achimas Welde in ''Death of Achilles'' are taken almost verbatim from Creator/FrederickForsyth's ''Literature/TheDayOfTheJackal''.
15th Apr '17 7:50:41 AM jamespolk
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* ''Literature/TheDiamondChariot''



* {{Ninja}}: Fandorin and [[spoiler:the Tamba Clan in ''Diamond Chariot'', including his own son]].



* NoPartyLikeADonnerParty: this is the backstory of Caliban.



* SpyDrama: ''The Diamond Chariot''.



* SwitchingPOV: In the first (1905) part of ''The Diamond Chariot'' the POV switches back and forth between Fandorin and the Japanese spy he's chasing. Also happens in the second (1878) part, see ADeathInTheLimelight above.
* TearOffYourFace: ''The Diamond Chariot'', twice.



* {{Yakuza}}: ''The Diamond Chariot''. Masa is a former criminal, whose life and honor Fandorin accidentally saved.

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* {{Yakuza}}: ''The Diamond Chariot''. Masa is a former criminal, whose life and honor Fandorin accidentally saved.

15th Apr '17 7:02:19 AM jamespolk
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* PlayingCardMotifs:
** In ''He Lover of Death'', all Khitrovka gangs seem to be structured like card decks: the gang leader is referred as King, his girlfriend is the Queen and his right-hand man is the Jack, while the regular gang members are spread out between ten and six (from most important to most expendable, respectively). The Ace is a King whose gang dominates the entirety of Moscow underworld.
*** This has some basis in fact: "shesterka" (the card six) is a [[TheMafiya fenya]] term for "stooge, lackey, expendable man".



* StreetUrchin: Senka Skorik in ''He Lover of Death''
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