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History Literature / DonQuixote

12th May '16 4:33:19 AM Amon_Ra
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The story is about an old ''hidalgo'' named Alonso Quijano, who was so into chivalric novels that he became insane and decided that he was a vagrant knight. Quijano renames himself as "Don Quixote de La Mancha" and decides to win eternal fame through the besting of criminals and general upholding of the Chivalric Code. Unfortunately for a lot of innocent people, his delusions make him pick fights with innocent bystanders, some of whom do not fight back because Don Quixote is obviously crazy. Of course, there are strangers who are not that sympathetic, and after one of those delivers a brutal beating to Don Quixote, a neighbor from his village meets the wounded Don Quixote and takes him home, where his friends and family burn out the accursed books of chivalry to try to cure him, but he soon returns to his delusion and journey. This time he manages to convince a simple farm-man, Sancho Panza, to become his squire and sidekick under the promise of a governorship in the future. Then they live a lot of adventures, including the famous one where Don Quixote attacks some windmills because they might be giants in disguise[[note]]the band Music/TheyMightBeGiants was named after the film ''Film/TheyMightBeGiants'', which referenced the book[[/note]]. At the end of the book, Don Quixote’s friends trick him by making him believe he is enchanted and take him back to his village.

to:

The story is about an old ''hidalgo'' named Alonso Quijano, who was so into chivalric novels that he became insane and decided that he was a vagrant knight. Quijano renames himself as "Don Quixote de La Mancha" and decides to win eternal fame through the besting of criminals and general upholding of the Chivalric Code. Unfortunately for a lot of innocent people, his delusions make him pick fights with innocent bystanders, some of whom do not fight back because Don Quixote is obviously crazy. Of course, there are strangers who are not that sympathetic, and after one of those delivers a brutal beating to Don Quixote, a neighbor from his village meets the wounded Don Quixote and takes him home, where his friends and family burn out the accursed cursed books of chivalry to try to cure him, but he soon returns to his delusion and journey. This time he manages to convince a simple farm-man, Sancho Panza, to become his squire and sidekick under the promise of a governorship in the future. Then they live a lot of adventures, including the famous one where Don Quixote attacks some windmills because they might be giants in disguise[[note]]the band Music/TheyMightBeGiants was named after the film ''Film/TheyMightBeGiants'', which referenced the book[[/note]]. At the end of the book, Don Quixote’s friends trick him by making him believe he is enchanted and take him back to his village.
12th May '16 4:32:27 AM Amon_Ra
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The story is about an old ''hidalgo'' named Alonso Quijano, who was so into chivalric novels that he became insane and decided that he was a vagrant knight. Quijano renames himself as "Don Quixote de La Mancha" and decides to win eternal fame through the besting of wrongdoers and general upholding of the Chivalric Code. Unfortunately for a lot of innocent people, his delusions make him pick fights with innocent bystanders, some of whom do not fight back because Don Quixote is obviously crazy. Of course, there are strangers who are not that sympathetic, and after one of those delivers a brutal beating to Don Quixote, a neighbor from his village meets the wounded Don Quixote and takes him home, where his friends and family burn out the accursed books of chivalry to try to cure him, but he soon returns to his delusion and journey. This time he manages to convince a simple farm-man, Sancho Panza, to become his squire and sidekick under the promise of a governorship in the future. Then they live a lot of adventures, including the famous one where Don Quixote attacks some windmills because they might be giants in disguise[[note]]the band Music/TheyMightBeGiants was named after the film ''Film/TheyMightBeGiants'', which referenced the book[[/note]]. At the end of the book, Don Quixote’s friends trick him by making him believe he is enchanted and take him back to his village.

to:

The story is about an old ''hidalgo'' named Alonso Quijano, who was so into chivalric novels that he became insane and decided that he was a vagrant knight. Quijano renames himself as "Don Quixote de La Mancha" and decides to win eternal fame through the besting of wrongdoers criminals and general upholding of the Chivalric Code. Unfortunately for a lot of innocent people, his delusions make him pick fights with innocent bystanders, some of whom do not fight back because Don Quixote is obviously crazy. Of course, there are strangers who are not that sympathetic, and after one of those delivers a brutal beating to Don Quixote, a neighbor from his village meets the wounded Don Quixote and takes him home, where his friends and family burn out the accursed books of chivalry to try to cure him, but he soon returns to his delusion and journey. This time he manages to convince a simple farm-man, Sancho Panza, to become his squire and sidekick under the promise of a governorship in the future. Then they live a lot of adventures, including the famous one where Don Quixote attacks some windmills because they might be giants in disguise[[note]]the band Music/TheyMightBeGiants was named after the film ''Film/TheyMightBeGiants'', which referenced the book[[/note]]. At the end of the book, Don Quixote’s friends trick him by making him believe he is enchanted and take him back to his village.
30th Mar '16 6:48:59 AM Zaphira76
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The first part of the novel was published in 1605, when the books of chivalry were pushing DeaderThanDisco and Don Quixote's dreams of reviving chivalric ways were really a strange, misbegotten idea. The novel became a big success among the public of the time (although that success was nothing unheard of at the time with other titles, and certainly that was not the case with the contemporary Spanish critics), and was reprinted several times in the next decade and even translated into French and English. But most notable was the change in Spanish popular culture. A few months after printing, virtually all of Spain knew about Don Quixote’s exploits: {{Memetic Mutation}}s arose, those ridiculous books of chivalry became popular again]], and even apocryphal "continuations" appeared. Cervantes created a character to mock the FanDumb and the books of chivalry that perverted true heroism, only to find that Don Quixote, thanks to his readers, had achieved his goal: to change reality.

to:

The first part of the novel was published in 1605, when the books of chivalry were pushing DeaderThanDisco and Don Quixote's dreams of reviving chivalric ways were really a strange, misbegotten idea. The novel became a big success among the public of the time (although that success was nothing unheard of at the time with other titles, and certainly that was not the case with the contemporary Spanish critics), and was reprinted several times in the next decade and even translated into French and English. But most notable was the change in Spanish popular culture. A few months after printing, virtually all of Spain knew about Don Quixote’s exploits: {{Memetic Mutation}}s arose, those ridiculous books of chivalry became popular again]], again, and even apocryphal "continuations" appeared. Cervantes created a character to mock the FanDumb and the books of chivalry that perverted true heroism, only to find that Don Quixote, thanks to his readers, had achieved his goal: to change reality.
15th Mar '16 4:51:27 AM star3catcher
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** In any Arcadia poem, one of the various [[LoveMartyr shepherds complains about]] [[IceQueen the shepherdess that ignores him]]. Marcela and Grisostomo deconstruct this at chapter XII – XIV, where the Shepherdess IceQueen claims she is SoBeautifulItsACurse and so she had to be a shepherdess only to get her freedom, but all the [[CityMouse city mice]] [[FlockOfWolves that courted her decided to be shepherds too]]. If [[SpurnedIntoSuicide Grisóstomo killed himself]], [[FairForItsDay it is unjust to blame her]].

to:

** In any Arcadia poem, one of the various [[LoveMartyr shepherds complains about]] [[IceQueen the shepherdess that ignores him]]. Marcela and Grisostomo deconstruct this at chapter XII – XIV, where the Shepherdess IceQueen claims she is SoBeautifulItsACurse and so she had to be a shepherdess only to get her freedom, but all the [[CityMouse city mice]] [[FlockOfWolves that courted her decided to be shepherds too]]. She states plainly that just because you are attracted to someone doesn't mean that you are entitled to that person's affections or that they are obligated to love you back, and if someone's rejection of your advances is so very torturous, then the onus is on you to get over them and move on, not to continue chasing after them when they've already made it clear that they want nothing to do with you. If you continue to do so, the only one who is being cruel to you is ''yourself'', not the object of your affections for merely ''existing'' and asserting their basic right to not have to be with anyone they don't love. Thus, if [[SpurnedIntoSuicide Grisóstomo killed himself]], [[FairForItsDay it is unjust to blame her]].
21st Feb '16 12:20:43 AM LordGro
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** Played straight at the end of the novel by Don Quixote, whom could not survive his FanDisillusionment.

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** Played straight at Forced to return to his hometown and lay down his arms by his defeat to the end Knight of the novel by White Moon (really his friend Sansón Carrasco), Don Quixote, whom could not survive Quijote falls seriously ill. His friends believe he is dying of despair over his FanDisillusionment.defeat, but unexpectedly the sickness snaps him out of his delusion, and he expresses relief that he has regained his sanity before dying.
6th Feb '16 11:00:46 PM Viethra
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*** Rhino's hamsterball is Rocinante.

to:

*** Rhino's The hamsterball is Rocinante.
6th Feb '16 10:59:49 PM Viethra
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Added DiffLines:

** The Disney film {{Disney/Bolt}} is arguably a retelling of this story with Bolt in the place of [[spoiler:Don Quixote]], Rhino filling the role of [[spoiler:Sancho Panza]], Penny playing [[spoiler:Dulcinea]], and Mittens standing in for [[spoiler:Cordonza.]] The windmill is the [[spoiler:television show ''Bolt'']] but there is a real windmill too.
*** Rhino's hamsterball is Rocinante.
15th Jan '16 7:36:55 AM Anddrix
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** In the Preface of the Author, Part I, [[TakeThat Cervantes attacks authors that want to impress their readers with his knowledge without the appropriate research]]. Cervantes denounces [[AltumVidetur to include sentences of Latin that seem to be profound]] [[ShownTheirWork (and so impress his lectors)]], but [[ViewersAreMorons in reality,]] [[SmallReferencePools those Latin sentences were very common and any author of his time could find them with very little effort]]. In a word, [[LampshadeHanging he]] '''[[LampshadeHanging defines]]''' [[LampshadeHanging this trope]] in the 17th century. And then, Cervantes proceeds to [[HypocriticalHumor include some sentences in Latin in both parts of Don Quixote]].

to:

** In the Preface of the Author, Part I, [[TakeThat Cervantes attacks authors that want to impress their readers with his knowledge without the appropriate research]]. Cervantes denounces [[AltumVidetur to include sentences of Latin that seem to be profound]] [[ShownTheirWork (and so impress his lectors)]], but [[ViewersAreMorons in reality,]] reality, [[SmallReferencePools those Latin sentences were very common and any author of his time could find them with very little effort]]. In a word, [[LampshadeHanging he]] '''[[LampshadeHanging defines]]''' [[LampshadeHanging this trope]] in the 17th century. And then, Cervantes proceeds to [[HypocriticalHumor include some sentences in Latin in both parts of Don Quixote]].



-->''"I myself, at any rate," said the canon, "[[DeadFic was once tempted to write a book of chivalry]] [[FixFic in which all the points I have mentioned were to be observed]]; [[FanFic and if I must own the truth I have more than a hundred sheets written; and to try if it came up to my own opinion of it, I showed them to persons who were fond of this kind of reading]], [[ViewersAreGeniuses to learned and intelligent men]] as well as to [[ViewersAreMorons ignorant people who cared for nothing but the pleasure of listening to nonsense]], and from all I obtained flattering approval; nevertheless I proceeded no farther with it, [[SciFiGhetto as well because it seemed to me an occupation inconsistent with my profession]], as because I perceived that the [[LowestCommonDenominator fools are more numerous than the wise; and, though it is better to be praised by the wise few than applauded by the foolish many, I have no mind to submit myself to the stupid judgment of the silly public, to whom the reading of such books falls for the most part]]."''

to:

-->''"I myself, at any rate," said the canon, "[[DeadFic was once tempted to write a book of chivalry]] [[FixFic in which all the points I have mentioned were to be observed]]; [[FanFic and if I must own the truth I have more than a hundred sheets written; and to try if it came up to my own opinion of it, I showed them to persons who were fond of this kind of reading]], [[ViewersAreGeniuses to learned and intelligent men]] as well as to [[ViewersAreMorons ignorant people who cared for nothing but the pleasure of listening to nonsense]], nonsense, and from all I obtained flattering approval; nevertheless I proceeded no farther with it, [[SciFiGhetto as well because it seemed to me an occupation inconsistent with my profession]], as because I perceived that the [[LowestCommonDenominator fools are more numerous than the wise; and, though it is better to be praised by the wise few than applauded by the foolish many, I have no mind to submit myself to the stupid judgment of the silly public, to whom the reading of such books falls for the most part]]."''



** Played straight at the Preface of the Author, Part I: a friend of Cervantes advises him to get [[LongList a book that quotes famous authors from A to Z and just insert the examples in his own book, so Cervantes can feign that he knows all those authors, because some]] [[ViewersAreMorons readers are simple enough to believe that the author can use all those quotes in any book]].

to:

** Played straight at the Preface of the Author, Part I: a friend of Cervantes advises him to get [[LongList a book that quotes famous authors from A to Z and just insert the examples in his own book, so Cervantes can feign that he knows all those authors, because some]] [[ViewersAreMorons readers are simple enough to believe that the author can use all those quotes in any book]].book.



* SmallReferencePools: This trope is defined and lampshaded by Cervantes in the Preface of the Author, Part I, [[TakeThat denouncing a common author trick]]: Any Spanish author of XVII century only needs to mention the most obvious and world-renowned people or facts. And he doesn't even need to know those facts, he could only research [[LongList a book that quotes famous authors from A to Z]] and just insert the examples in his own book, because some [[ViewersAreMorons readers are simple enough to believe that the author can use all those quotes in any book]].

to:

* SmallReferencePools: This trope is defined and lampshaded by Cervantes in the Preface of the Author, Part I, [[TakeThat denouncing a common author trick]]: Any Spanish author of XVII century only needs to mention the most obvious and world-renowned people or facts. And he doesn't even need to know those facts, he could only research [[LongList a book that quotes famous authors from A to Z]] and just insert the examples in his own book, because some [[ViewersAreMorons readers are simple enough to believe that the author can use all those quotes in any book]].book.



*** The second advice of his friend is [[AltumVidetur to include sentences of Latin that seem to be profound]] [[ShownTheirWork (and so impress his lectors)]], but [[ViewersAreMorons in reality,]] [[SmallReferencePools those Latin sentences were very common and any author of his time could find them with very little effort]].

to:

*** The second advice of his friend is [[AltumVidetur to include sentences of Latin that seem to be profound]] [[ShownTheirWork (and so impress his lectors)]], but [[ViewersAreMorons in reality,]] reality, [[SmallReferencePools those Latin sentences were very common and any author of his time could find them with very little effort]].



*** Last but not least, in his prologue of part I, Cervante’s friend mentions a common author trick of his time: Any Spanish author of XVII century only needs to mention the most obvious and world-renowned people or facts. And he doesn´t even need to know those facts, he could only research [[LongList a book that quotes famous authors from A to Z]] and just insert the examples in his own book, because some [[ViewersAreMorons readers are simple enough to believe that the author can use all those quotes in any book]]. Critics have said that this last reference was an attack to Lope de Vega, the most influential Spanish playwright and writer, and very successful and famous in their own time. (Cervantes himself was not successful, but he is one of the most influential universal writers).

to:

*** Last but not least, in his prologue of part I, Cervante’s friend mentions a common author trick of his time: Any Spanish author of XVII century only needs to mention the most obvious and world-renowned people or facts. And he doesn´t even need to know those facts, he could only research [[LongList a book that quotes famous authors from A to Z]] and just insert the examples in his own book, because some [[ViewersAreMorons readers are simple enough to believe that the author can use all those quotes in any book]].book. Critics have said that this last reference was an attack to Lope de Vega, the most influential Spanish playwright and writer, and very successful and famous in their own time. (Cervantes himself was not successful, but he is one of the most influential universal writers).
21st Dec '15 11:59:20 AM maxwellsilver
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* AchillesInHisTent: Parodied when Don Quixote invokes this trope for no other reason that a lot of other Knights (Amadis of Gaul, Beltenebros, and Orlando) did it. At the Sierra Morena forest, Don Quixote sends Sancho with a letter to Dulcinea (his imaginary love interest) explaining her that he will be in the forest until she forgives him… Even when Don Quixote has not made anything against her. This madness will force the Curate and the Barber to ask Dorotea to pretend to be a princess and ask Don Quixote a favour to get him out of the forest.
-->'' "It seems to me," said Sancho, "[[FridgeLogic that the knights who behaved in this way had provocation and cause for those follies and penances; but what cause has your worship for going mad? What lady has rejected you, or what evidence have you found to prove that the lady Dulcinea del Toboso has been trifling with Moor or Christian?"]]''
-->'' "There is the point," replied Don Quixote, "[[InsaneTrollLogic and that is the beauty of this business of mine; no thanks to a knight-errant for going mad when he has cause; the thing is to turn crazy without any provocation, and let my lady know, if I do this in the dry, what I would do in the moist;]] ''

to:

* AchillesInHisTent: Parodied when Don Quixote invokes this trope for no other reason that a lot of other Knights (Amadis of Gaul, Beltenebros, and Orlando) did it. At the Sierra Morena forest, Don Quixote sends Sancho with a letter to Dulcinea (his imaginary love interest) explaining to her that he will be in the forest until she forgives him… Even when Don Quixote has not made anything against her. This madness will force the Curate and the Barber to ask Dorotea to pretend to be a princess and ask Don Quixote a favour to get him out of the forest.
-->'' "It seems to me," said Sancho, "[[FridgeLogic that "that the knights who behaved in this way had provocation and cause for those follies and penances; but what cause has your worship for going mad? What lady has rejected you, or what evidence have you found to prove that the lady Dulcinea del Toboso has been trifling with Moor or Christian?"]]''
Christian?"''
-->'' "There is the point," replied Don Quixote, "[[InsaneTrollLogic and "and that is the beauty of this business of mine; no thanks to a knight-errant for going mad when he has cause; the thing is to turn crazy without any provocation, and let my lady know, if I do this in the dry, what I would do in the moist;]] moist; ''
21st Dec '15 11:57:54 AM maxwellsilver
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The story is about an old ''[[BlueBlood hidalgo]]'' named Alonso Quijano, [[YouWatchTooMuchX who was so into]] [[ChivalricRomance chivalric novels]] that he became insane and [[AscendedFanboy decided that he was a vagrant knight]]. [[MeaningfulRename Quijano renames himself as "Don Quixote de La Mancha"]] and decides to [[GlorySeeker win eternal fame]] through [[KnightInShiningArmor the besting of wrongdoers and general upholding of the Chivalric Code]]. Unfortunately for a lot of innocent people, his delusions [[LordErrorProne make him pick fights]] with innocent bystanders, some of whom do not fight back because Don Quixote is obviously crazy. Of course, there are strangers who are not that sympathetic, and after one of those [[HilarityEnsues delivers a brutal beating to Don Quixote]], a neighbor from his village meets the wounded Don Quixote and takes him home, where his friends and family burn out the accursed [[ChivalricRomance books of chivalry]] to try to cure him, but he soon returns to his delusion and journey. This time he manages to convince a simple farm-man, [[{{Foil}} Sancho Panza]], to become his squire and sidekick under the [[StandardHeroReward promise of a governorship in the future]]. Then they live [[{{Troperiffic}} a lot of adventures]], including the famous one where [[WindmillCrusader Don Quixote attacks some windmills]] because they might be [[WindmillPolitical giants in disguise]][[note]]the band Music/TheyMightBeGiants was named after the film ''Film/TheyMightBeGiants'', which referenced the book[[/note]]. At the end of the book, [[ThoseTwoGuys Don Quixote’s friends]] trick him [[WrongGenreSavvy by making him believe he is enchanted]] and take him back to his village.

Throughout the novel, Don Quixote never, even for a moment, doubts that the fictional adventures that he has read were real and that he really is a knight errant. Not even the [[ThresholdGuardians petitions of his loved ones]], [[HumiliationConga the continuous ridicule of his peers]], or [[YouCanBarelyStand the brutal beatings he suffers]] made him break his resolution: [[{{Determinator}} Don Quixote always continues trying to impose his quixotic (literally; he's the word's origin) beliefs on the world]].

The first part of the novel was [[OlderThanSteam published in 1605]], when the books of chivalry were pushing DeaderThanDisco and Don Quixote's [[AffectionateParody dreams of reviving chivalry ways]] were really a strange, misbegotten idea. The novel became a big success among the public of the time (although that success was nothing unheard of at the time with other titles, and [[ItsPopularNowItSucks certainly that was not the case]] [[SmallNameBigEgo with the contemporary Spanish critics)]], and was reprinted several times in the next decade and even translated into French and English. But most notable was the change in Spanish popular culture. [[PopCulturalOsmosis A few months after printing, virtually all of Spain knew about Don Quixote’s exploits:]] {{Memetic Mutation}}s arose, [[CyclicTrope those ridiculous books of chivalry became popular again]], and even apocryphal "[[FanFiction continuations]]" appeared. Cervantes created a character to mock the FanDumb and the books of chivalry that perverted true heroism, only to find that Don Quixote, [[ArtistDisillusionment thanks to his readers]], had achieved his goal: to change [[RealLife reality]].

Cervantes had promised a sequel at the end of Volume I and had begun writing it when he caught word of [[OlderThanTheyThink a spurious fake sequel of Don Quixote written as a cash grab]]. This led him to denounce the book in his own pages and led him to make Vol II, the hidalgo's final adventure. The second part has [[CerebusSyndrome a more serious tone]], taking advantage of the change operated by the first part of the book in RealLife, where Don Quixote has evolved from a LordErrorProne to an honest (but still insane) man whose noble attitude and delusions makes him the ButtMonkey of a lot of people. Don Quixote has to confront his delusions (but only in the very last chapter), and the harshness of reality makes him realize that [[FanDisillusionment his naïve dreams were shallow]], [[BoredWithInsanity which brings him back to sanity]] [[DeathByDespair before his death]].

It has been adapted to every medium, among those illustrated by Creator/GustaveDore. Also made into a couple of animated adaptations (one of them with {{Funny Animal}}s) and even a [[TheMusical Musical]].

Very commonly cited, in literary criticism, as "the first modern novel", and is probably among the most influential books of all time (just take a look at TheOtherWiki's [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_works_influenced_by_Don_Quixote list]]). It's also largely considered the best book ever written in the Spanish language, and nowadays every single Spaniard kid must read it and study it in school at one point or another, pretty much as every kid in the USA and UK must read and study Shakespeare.

to:

The story is about an old ''[[BlueBlood hidalgo]]'' ''hidalgo'' named Alonso Quijano, [[YouWatchTooMuchX who was so into]] [[ChivalricRomance into chivalric novels]] novels that he became insane and [[AscendedFanboy decided that he was a vagrant knight]]. [[MeaningfulRename knight. Quijano renames himself as "Don Quixote de La Mancha"]] Mancha" and decides to [[GlorySeeker win eternal fame]] fame through [[KnightInShiningArmor the besting of wrongdoers and general upholding of the Chivalric Code]]. Code. Unfortunately for a lot of innocent people, his delusions [[LordErrorProne make him pick fights]] fights with innocent bystanders, some of whom do not fight back because Don Quixote is obviously crazy. Of course, there are strangers who are not that sympathetic, and after one of those [[HilarityEnsues delivers a brutal beating to Don Quixote]], Quixote, a neighbor from his village meets the wounded Don Quixote and takes him home, where his friends and family burn out the accursed [[ChivalricRomance books of chivalry]] chivalry to try to cure him, but he soon returns to his delusion and journey. This time he manages to convince a simple farm-man, [[{{Foil}} Sancho Panza]], Panza, to become his squire and sidekick under the [[StandardHeroReward promise of a governorship in the future]]. future. Then they live [[{{Troperiffic}} a lot of adventures]], adventures, including the famous one where [[WindmillCrusader Don Quixote attacks some windmills]] windmills because they might be [[WindmillPolitical giants in disguise]][[note]]the disguise[[note]]the band Music/TheyMightBeGiants was named after the film ''Film/TheyMightBeGiants'', which referenced the book[[/note]]. At the end of the book, [[ThoseTwoGuys Don Quixote’s friends]] friends trick him [[WrongGenreSavvy by making him believe he is enchanted]] enchanted and take him back to his village.

Throughout the novel, Don Quixote never, even for a moment, doubts that the fictional adventures that he has read were real and that he really is a knight errant. Not even the [[ThresholdGuardians petitions of his loved ones]], [[HumiliationConga ones, the continuous ridicule of his peers]], peers, or [[YouCanBarelyStand the brutal beatings he suffers]] suffers made him break his resolution: [[{{Determinator}} Don Quixote always continues trying to impose his quixotic (literally; he's the word's origin) beliefs on the world]].

world.

The first part of the novel was [[OlderThanSteam published in 1605]], 1605, when the books of chivalry were pushing DeaderThanDisco and Don Quixote's [[AffectionateParody dreams of reviving chivalry ways]] chivalric ways were really a strange, misbegotten idea. The novel became a big success among the public of the time (although that success was nothing unheard of at the time with other titles, and [[ItsPopularNowItSucks certainly that was not the case]] [[SmallNameBigEgo case with the contemporary Spanish critics)]], critics), and was reprinted several times in the next decade and even translated into French and English. But most notable was the change in Spanish popular culture. [[PopCulturalOsmosis A few months after printing, virtually all of Spain knew about Don Quixote’s exploits:]] exploits: {{Memetic Mutation}}s arose, [[CyclicTrope those ridiculous books of chivalry became popular again]], and even apocryphal "[[FanFiction continuations]]" "continuations" appeared. Cervantes created a character to mock the FanDumb and the books of chivalry that perverted true heroism, only to find that Don Quixote, [[ArtistDisillusionment thanks to his readers]], readers, had achieved his goal: to change [[RealLife reality]].

reality.

Cervantes had promised a sequel at the end of Volume I and had begun writing it when he caught word of [[OlderThanTheyThink a spurious fake sequel of Don Quixote written as a cash grab]].grab. This led him to denounce the book in his own pages and led him to make Vol II, the hidalgo's final adventure. The second part has [[CerebusSyndrome a more serious tone]], tone, taking advantage of the change operated by the first part of the book in RealLife, where Don Quixote has evolved from a LordErrorProne to an honest (but still insane) man whose noble attitude and delusions makes him the ButtMonkey of a lot of people. Don Quixote has to confront his delusions (but only in the very last chapter), and the harshness of reality makes him realize that [[FanDisillusionment his naïve dreams were shallow]], [[BoredWithInsanity shallow, which brings him back to sanity]] [[DeathByDespair sanity before his death]].death.

It has been adapted to every medium, among those illustrated by Creator/GustaveDore. Also made into a couple of animated adaptations (one of them with {{Funny Animal}}s) and even a [[TheMusical Musical]].

Musical.

Very commonly cited, cited in literary criticism, criticism as "the first modern novel", novel" and is probably among the most influential books of all time (just take a look at TheOtherWiki's [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_works_influenced_by_Don_Quixote list]]). It's also largely considered the best book ever written in the Spanish language, and nowadays every single Spaniard kid must read it and study it in school at one point or another, pretty much as every kid in the USA and UK must read and study Shakespeare.
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