History Literature / DoctorWhoNewAdventures

7th Dec '17 6:42:15 PM PaulA
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* InMediasRes: ''Set Piece'' begins with the Doctor already held prisoner by the big bad, with a flashback later on to explain how that happened.


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* IntroOnlyPointOfView: ''Set Piece'' begins with the Doctor already held prisoner by the big bad. His repeated attempts to escape are told from the point of view of another prisoner. [[spoiler:It turns out her memories are being extracted by the big bad in an attempt to gain a better understanding of the Doctor; she doesn't survive the process.]]
22nd Nov '17 10:33:01 PM PaulA
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* ClockPunk: The main form of technology in ''Sky Pirates!'', including clockwork robots and clockwork machine guns (which, in keeping with the novel's tone, have such a ludicrously low rate of fire that it would almost be faster to reload by hand).



* LastOfHisKind: ''Sky Pirates!'' ends with the Doctor going up against an alien being that's the last survivor of species wiped out long ago by the Time Lords in an us-or-them war of extermination.



** The CoolShip in ''Sky Pirates!''

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** The CoolShip CoolShip, the Schirron Dream, in ''Sky Pirates!''


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* OffscreenMomentOfAwesome: ''Sky Pirates!'' has a sequence in which the heroes set out on an expedition to retrieve a PlotCoupon from the heart of an ancient temple full of devious and deadly traps, only for the viewpoint character to promptly be knocked unconscious and not wake up until after the rest of the expedition gets back, plot coupon in hand.


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* PlotCoupon: The plot of ''Sky Pirates!'' revolves around a search for a scattered set of legendary jewels called the Eyes of Schirron. Legends differ on what will happen when the Eyes are reunited, but it's bound to be something awesome.


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** Deconstructed in ''Sky Pirates!'', which suggests that the reason the Doctor never encounters any ''really'' alien aliens is that those were all wiped out by the Time Lords to make the universe more comfortable for Time-Lord-like species. The novel features an encounter with a lone survivor of one of the species wiped out by the Time Lords, which is so completely alien that just being in the same room as it threatens the sanity.
22nd Nov '17 8:23:40 PM PaulA
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* LiteraryAllusionTitle: ''No Future'' takes its title from the punk anthem "God Save the Queen" by the Music/SexPistols.

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* LiteraryAllusionTitle: LiteraryAllusionTitle:
**
''No Future'' takes its title from the punk anthem "God Save the Queen" by the Music/SexPistols.Music/SexPistols.
** ''So Vile a Sin'' takes its title from a line in ''Theatre/HenryV'', which is quoted as the novel's epigraph.


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* MercyKill: In ''So Vile a Sin'', the Doctor is called on to do this to [[spoiler:the Empress of Humanity, who is being kept on artificial life support in inhumane conditions as the Empire's figurehead. This complicates his mission, since he has to get on with foiling the villains while also being pursued by the authorities for murder]].
22nd Nov '17 8:09:08 PM PaulA
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* SkyPirate: In ''[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Sky Pirates]][[ExcitedShowTitle !]]''

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* SingleBiomePlanet: The System in ''Sky Pirates!'' comprises an ocean world, a forest world, a desert world and an ice world. However, this is far from [[WorldShapes the weirdest thing about them]], and it's made very clear that The System feels under no obligation to do anything that our universe would consider "making sense".
* SkyPirate: In ''[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Sky Pirates]][[ExcitedShowTitle !]]''''Sky Pirates!'' blurred the line between this trope and SpacePirates with its setting being a solar system within a pocket universe which is fully pressurized with a breathable atmosphere. The pirates (and all the other "space" ships) are able to travel in a variety of non-airtight steampunk-esque vessels, some with open decks.



* SurvivalistStash: ''Sky Pirates!'', when the heroes are stuck on an ice planet. Not a survivalists' bunker, though, but a stash left by arctic explorers.



* TokenRomance: ShowWithinAShow version, in ''Lucifer Rising''.

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* TemporaryLoveInterest: The Doctor is mostly immune, but all the companions get it to some extent.
* TheTrickster: In ''Love and War'', the 25th century New Age Travellers have a trickster god they just call the Trickster. During Jan's vision quest, he [[AFormYouAreComfortableWith appears to Jan]] as "Arlan Jardolz, the Betalan comedian" and to Ace as Vic Reeves.
* TokenRomance: ShowWithinAShow version, in ''Lucifer Rising''. Benny watches a holodrama based on the events of "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E5TheSeedsOfDeath The Seeds of Death]]". This has grafted on a romance between Professor Eldred (who has become thirty years younger) and Gia (TheSpock).



* TwoHeadedCoin: In one novel, the Doctor pulls a fifty pence piece out of his pocket and tosses it to make a decision. As he puts it back in his pocket he notices the other side also has a picture of the Queen, only she's grinning.
* UnsuspectinglySoused: Parodied in ''Sky Pirates!'', in which HardDrinkingPartyGirl Benny Summerfield wakes up with a hangover and declares "Y'know, I'm positive there was alcohol in that scotch last night."



* VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: In-universe in ''Lucifer Rising''; there's a reference to a holodrama based on "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E5TheSeedsOfDeath The Seeds of Death]]" which is only recognisable by the character names, awash with AdaptationalAttractiveness and TokenRomance, and doesn't mention the Doctor's involvement at all.
* VisionsOfAnotherSelf: In ''So Vile a Sin'', the reality-warping effects of the villainous plot have the side-effect that alternate versions of the Doctor keeping popping up for a few moments and then disappearing, including a version of the Doctor who chose to stay on Earth after his exile ended (who still in his third incarnation, though much aged). The Doctor also encounters a version of Chris who chose to stay home and not travel with him.



* WeWillNotHaveAppendixesInTheFuture: Chris and Roz.

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* WeWillNotHaveAppendixesInTheFuture: Chris and Roz.Roz, who are from the 30th century, have no appendices.
* WhatDoYouMeanItsNotDidactic: In-universe. In ''Sky Pirates!'', we're told that Bernice Summerfield, when an angsty teenager, wrote a lengthy dissertation on the ''WesternAnimation/RalphWolfAndSamSheepdog'' cartoons that used the words "Apollonian" and "Dionysian" 327 times, pointed out the significance of the supposedly primitive wolf being the tool user, and portrayed Sam as the unwitting dupe of a culture that killed and killed again, hypocritically "defending" its victims from outsiders, before concluding that everything ended in misery and death and she was glad she didn't have a boyfriend or girlfriend because they were all wilfully uninterested in the important truths behind these so-called jokes.


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* WorldShapes: In ''Sky Pirates!'', the pocket dimension known as The System comprised four {{Single Biome Planet}}s all of extremely unusual shape. Possibly the most normal is Prometheus, a desert planet shaped like a large bowl. The water world Elysium is actually a globe, but it's also a vast blob of water with no actual planet beneath it. Aneas is a jungle planet shaped like a giant tree, and Reklon is an ice planet shaped like a snowman, complete with pipe and silly hat.


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* YouCannotGraspTheTrueForm:
** The seven-dimensional Legion, introduced in ''Lucifer Rising'', aren't even ''contiguous'' in three dimensions.
** ''Sky Pirates!'' features a small pocket universe that is one of these, which is hiding a totally separate species that is also one, and it also heavily implies the Doctor himself falls into this category. Its loose sequel ''Death and Diplomacy'' extends this to the TARDIS too.
22nd Nov '17 1:02:52 AM PaulA
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* MadeFromRealGirlScouts: In ''Sky Pirates!'', when Benny wants a drink to fortify her against the cold, the Doctor offers her something called Bartle and Critchlowe's Patented And Very Efficacious Horse Oil Lineament, made from genuine horses. She declines.



* MissedHimByThatMuch: In ''Birthright'', the immortal villain has spent centuries trying to get hold of the TARDIS, and repeatedly showing up in places where it has been sighted just after it dematerializes.
* MonumentalDamage:
** Canterbury Cathedral is destroyed in ''Warlock''.
** In ''No Future'', terrorists (in an alternate timeline) bomb [[ClockTower Big Ben]].



* MusclesAreMeaningless: The Doctor is often described as having an uncanny strength, and the grip of a bear, when need be. He's 5'6" and of a small build.



* NonPOVProtagonist: The writers' guidelines included an explicit rule forbidding writers to show what was going on inside the Doctor's head, to keep an element of mystery about him; his actions were always to be seen through the eyes of his companion or another character. ''Conundrum'' [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this, as what starts out as Omniscient Third Person Narration is [[NarratorAllAlong actually]] the Master of the Land of Fiction, and the fact his omniscience stops at the Doctor's mind (and only the Doctor's) frustrates him.



* OrganicTechnology: See Living Ship.

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* OrganicTechnology: See Living Ship.The TARDIS, at least in part. The "Cat's Cradle" arc has the Doctor needing to replace the organic material that the TARDIS uses for calculations that are impossible on conventional computers.



* ProudWarriorRaceGuy: The Chelonians, who appear in several novels, are a heavily militarised race of hermaphroditic cyborg turtles, at least when they appear on the page -- we're told that eventually they get a more enlightened leadership and dedicate themselves to flower-arranging instead.
* PyramidPower: In ''SLEEPY'' by Kate Orman, the planet Yemaya has pyramids that seem to focus psychic powers, with a ContinuityNod to the Osirians (the AncientAstronauts who influenced the Egyptians in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E3PyramidsOfMars Pyramids of Mars]]") and the Exxilons (Space {{Mayincatec}}s from "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS11E3DeathToTheDaleks Death to the Daleks]]"). This is partly because her previous two [=NAs=], which happened to be set in Mexico and Egypt respectively, had both had a pyramid on the cover and she wanted to maintain the theme. (Her fourth NA, ''Return of the Living Dad'', is largely set in a New Age bookshop/café called The Pyramid.)



* RashomonStyle: During the murder investigation in ''Lucifer Rising''.

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* RashomonStyle: During the The murder investigation in ''Lucifer Rising''.Rising''. The murder occurred in a facility with a futuristic surveillance system that makes only a basic record of what happens, relying on computer extrapolation to fill in the details when it's played back. It becomes both sides of a Rashomon Style dispute about what really happened in a certain conversation, producing two different extrapolations in which the speakers perform the same actions and say the same words, but the ''way'' they do it makes the difference between the version where one speaker was trying to help the other and the version where he was deliberately making matters worse.



* RuleNumberOne: A character-defining moment in ''Set Piece'', calling back to the RuleNumberOne moment in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS24E4Dragonfire Dragonfire]]".

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* RetroactivePreparation: {{Subverted|Trope}} in one novel. The Doctor walks up to a fridge, and proclaims "This fridge will be full of delicious food: in the future I will travel back in time and put it there." He opens the fridge; it's almost empty. "I forgot," he adds.
* RuinsForRuinsSake: In ''Theatre of War'', Bernice grows increasingly frustrated at a super-computer's inability to reconstruct what a ruined Roman-esque amphitheatre would have looked like before it fell into ruins. Turns out that there never was a real amphitheatre, it was built as a pile of ruins as part of a trap.
* RuleNumberOne: A character-defining moment in ''Set Piece'', calling back to the RuleNumberOne moment in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS24E4Dragonfire Dragonfire]]".Dragonfire]]" (where the Doctor said there were three rules for travelling with him, but couldn't think of a third one so said they'd work that one out later). Ace, seemingly left with no choice but to kill the Doctor to save the universe, flashes back to this conversation (and occasions when the Doctor had to make similar decisions) and decides that the third rule -- ''her'' rule -- is "No-one deserves to be sacrificed".
* RuleOfFunny: Deconstructed in ''Sky Pirates!'', which is set in a PocketDimension based on jokes, but makes it clear that it's not funny if it actually happens to you.
21st Nov '17 9:04:49 PM PaulA
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* AndIMustScream: ''The Room With No Doors'' has multiple examples:
** The "room with no doors" of the title refers to a mental cell where the Doctor fears his seventh incarnation's personality will be imprisoned once he regenerates into the Eighth Doctor. [[spoiler:''The New Adventures'' novels postulated that the Doctor's previous selves continue to exist and be aware in his own subconscious, able to interact with each other and observe the current incarnation's activities; the Seventh Doctor's mind had imprisoned the Sixth Doctor's personality for fear of it becoming too unstable and corrupting him, but faced that fate himself for nevertheless becoming dark, manipulative, and serving the greater good at the expense of his friends and innocent lives.]]
** [[spoiler:The macguffin of the novel turns out to be an lost cryogenic suspension pod containing a telekinetic alien. His abilities are unusual even amongst his own species, and freezing him for his own protection has unwittingly accelerated his mental processing to over 4,000 times normal as his brain became superconducting, which also hugely amplifies his abilities. The Doctor's recurring nightmare of the room with no doors is actually an echo of the alien's experience of being trapped in the pod.]]
** The Doctor himself is at one point buried alive by people who believe him to be dead. When he regains consciousness he directly invokes this trope by realising where he is and trying to give "one little tiny scream... but I can't open my mouth".



* BigBad: [[spoiler:The Monk from the TV series]] for the Alternative Universe arc.

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* BigBad: BigBad:
** The Timewyrm in the first story arc.
**
[[spoiler:The Monk from the TV series]] for the Alternative Universe arc.arc.
** The Psi Powers arc has the Brotherhood, ultimately led by the Grandmaster.



* DysfunctionJunction

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* DysfunctionJunctionDysfunctionJunction: Over the course of the books, Seventh did quite a few morally questionable things, which would leave him wondering just how close he was to going over to TheDarkSide. He got put through the proverbial grinder quite a few times in the course of events. Ace's parental issues had been established in the TV series, but in the books, the Doctor arranged the death of her current boyfriend, causing her to leave the TARDIS for several books and come back a [[DarkerAndEdgier hardbitten mercenary]] who took a long time to reconcile with the Doctor. Bernice had many issues, mainly relating to her childhood involving an interstellar war, a dead mother and a DisappearedDad. Roz was seriously unlucky in love; she killed her first partner -- a man she loved deeply -- when she found out he was corrupt, then [[LaserGuidedAmnesia got it wiped from her memory]] by the BigBad. Another of her love interests turned out to be a murderer; Roz being a by-the-book cop, this did not sit well with her. About the only one who was left untouched was Chris... up until Roz died, anyway, after which the novels made up for lost time.



* KeeperOfForbiddenKnowledge: The Library of St John the Beheaded

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* KeeperOfForbiddenKnowledge: The Library of St John the BeheadedBeheaded collects and stores forbidden texts (both in the sense of banned-by-the-mundane-authorities and in the sense of Knowledge For Which TheWorldIsNotReady). It's definitely got the isolated or hazardous location part of the trope down pat; on Earth, it was hidden away in TheCityNarrows, and in TheFuture it will be located on an asteroid as part of the Braxiatel Collection, which stores texts for which many worlds are not ready. In principle, it's an aversion of the usual some-things-man-should-not-know corollary: the founder believed that all knowledge is useful if handled carefully, and potential researchers are vetted very carefully before being offered access to the collection. (The Doctor, of course, holds the first ticket the Library ever issued.) In practice, though, pretty much every time it's appeared in a story it's because somebody's found a way to use information from the Library to cause trouble.


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** ''No Future'', set in the 1970s, features an unnamed BBC producer who has a beard, wears a Hawaiian shirt, and in the course of his few lines manages to hit every catchphrase and cliché associated with the bearded, Hawaiian-shirt-wearing ''Doctor Who'' producer Creator/JohnNathanTurner.


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* SuspiciouslySpecificDenial: In ''Transit'', the Doctor gets the AI FLORENCE to wipe every mention of him from Earth's data records, in exchange giving it the valuable advice "The golden rule is [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney those who have the gold, make the rules]]". In the much later NA ''Sky Pirates!'' the EncyclopediaExposita quotes include FLORENCE's autobiography, which attributes the line to "Anon. And not some alien who never existed in the first place and even if he did I never met him".


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* VerbalTic: Keri the Pakhar in ''Legacy'', yeah?
21st Nov '17 7:29:43 PM PaulA
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* GrayEyes: The novels tended to make much of the Seventh Doctor's gray eyes, presumably as a way to contrast his characterisation as TheChessmaster with his [[DitzyGenius previous incarnations]].
* HeadbuttOfLove: The Doctor and Benny instigate a headbutt of love mutually in ''SLEEPY'' during a point where they're both busy worrying about each other, and it's almost too adorable for words.



* HistoricalBeautyUpgrade: In-universe. In ''Lucifer Rising'', a historical drama about [[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E5TheSeedsOfDeath the Ice Warrior invasion of 2090]] features a "handsome young museum curator", who is presumably meant to be [[http://tardis.wikia.com/wiki/Daniel_Eldred this guy]].



* HorrifyingTheHorror: In ''Love and War'', the Doctor describes himself to his new acquaintance Benny as "what monsters have nightmares about".



* HurtComfortFic: A recurring theme, particularly in the novels of Kate Orman; two novels (Orman's ''Set Piece'' and Paul Cornell's ''Human Nature'') have chapters actually titled "Hurt/Comfort".

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* HurtComfortFic: A recurring theme, particularly in the novels of Kate Orman; two novels (Orman's ''Set Piece'' and Paul Cornell's ''Human Nature'') have chapters actually titled "Hurt/Comfort"."Hurt/Comfort" (chapter 15 and chapter 5 respectively).


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* IRegretNothing: Played with in ''Transit''. The Doctor and Kadiatu are caught in a crashing plane on Mars. Kadiatu hears him humming.
-->'''Kadiatu:''' What's that noise?\\
'''The Doctor:''' Edith Piaf. Born on a doorstop and sang the blues.\\
'''Kadiatu:''' I'd sing the blues, if I'd been born on a doorstep. What's the song about?\\
'''The Doctor:''' Regret.\\
'''Kadiatu:''' What did she regret?\\
'''The Doctor:''' Absolutely nothing.\\
''[they hit the ground]''
20th Nov '17 11:33:56 PM PaulA
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* DiscontinuityNod: Various novels include references to various dubious ''Doctor Who'' spin-offs in ways that establish their unreality:
** In ''First Frontier'', ''[[Recap/DoctorWho30thASDimensionsInTime Dimensions in Time]]'' was a ''literal'' [[AllJustADream nightmare]].
** In ''Head Games'', the OutOfCharacter ''Dalek Attack'' video game was a cathartic daydream, and the "Doctor Who" stories in ''TV Comic'' only happened in the Land of Fiction.

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* DiscontinuityNod: Various novels include references to various dubious ''Doctor Who'' spin-offs in ways that establish their unreality:
** In ''First Frontier'', ''[[Recap/DoctorWho30thASDimensionsInTime Dimensions in Time]]'' was a ''literal'' [[AllJustADream nightmare]].
**
In ''Head Games'', the OutOfCharacter ''Dalek Attack'' video game was a cathartic daydream, and the "Doctor Who" stories in ''TV Comic'' only happened in the Land of Fiction.
20th Nov '17 11:31:59 PM PaulA
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* DeadAlternateCounterpart: In ''Blood Heat'', the Seventh Doctor finds himself in a universe where Earth is ruled by Earth Reptiles, and learns it all started when the Third Doctor was killed during "Doctor Who and the Silurians".
* DeadlyGraduation: ''No Future'' features a U.N.I.T. soldier who had to do the puppy version (with a rabbit) when she was training for the British Army. The Brigadier's reaction to learning about it is that the people who trained her were bastards.



* DenserAndWackier: The series' mission was to push the envelope on stories that could be told in novel form, but none did it quite like ''Sky Pirates!'', which even replaced the usual blurb with:
-->Stories deeper, wider, firmer, plumper, perkier, yellower, crispier and with more incredible bad jokes than you can shake a stick at, the New Adventures take the TARDIS into previously unexplored realms of taste and stupidity.



* DiscontinuityNod: Various novels include references to various dubious ''Doctor Who'' spin-offs in ways that establish their unreality (''[[Recap/DoctorWho30thASDimensionsInTime Dimensions in Time]]'' was a ''literal'' [[AllJustADream nightmare]], the OutOfCharacter ''Dalek Attack'' video game was a cathartic daydream, the "Doctor Who" stories in ''TV Comic'' only happened in the Land of Fiction, and so on).

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* DiscontinuityNod: Various novels include references to various dubious ''Doctor Who'' spin-offs in ways that establish their unreality (''[[Recap/DoctorWho30thASDimensionsInTime unreality:
** In ''First Frontier'', ''[[Recap/DoctorWho30thASDimensionsInTime
Dimensions in Time]]'' was a ''literal'' [[AllJustADream nightmare]], nightmare]].
** In ''Head Games'',
the OutOfCharacter ''Dalek Attack'' video game was a cathartic daydream, and the "Doctor Who" stories in ''TV Comic'' only happened in the Land of Fiction, and so on).Fiction.



* DrunkenSong: A footnote in ''Sky Pirates!'' reveals a proverb common to many planets that Bernice Summerfield has visited:
-->"If a strange dark woman, after the tenth drink, suddenly begins to sing
--->What's that I hear? ''(put your hand to your ear)''\\
Upstairs in the attic? ''(point up)''\\
It is an elephant ''(make like a trunk)''\\
Riding around on a bicycle ''(stomp stupidly)''\\
It is an elephant ''(ditto last line but one)''\\
So ''chic'' and elegant ''(flounce!)''\\
With one trunk here and one tail there ''(thing with the trunk again, and then bump and grind)''
-->do not under any circumstances approach her for she shall immediately fall over and be violently and spectacularly ill on you."



* EngineeredPublicConfession: The Doctor arranges one for the villain in ''The Dying Days''.

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* EngineeredPublicConfession: The Doctor arranges one for the villain in In ''The Dying Days''.Days'', the Doctor arranges one of these for the alien warlord who has taken over Britain and declared himself King. After tricking him into breathing in {{helium|Speech}} the Doctor then displays the whole conversation as a giant hologram in the sky with the villain's (squeaky) rant broadcast all over the world.
-->'''The Doctor:''' I think you've just made your abdication speech, Your Majesty.
* EverybodyIsSingle: Less than a year after Benny exited the series by marrying Jason, with an entire novel devoted to showing the wedding and assuring the audience they were going to live happily ever after, the decision was made to give her her own spin-off, and since the lead character of an adventure series obviously must be available to hook up with Love Interests of the Week, another entire novel was devoted to showing their marriage collapsing so messily that it upstaged the violent deaths of a tenth of the Earth's population.


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* ExcitedShowTitle: ''Sky Pirates!''


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* ExplosiveDecompression: In ''Lucifer Rising'', a man explodes into [[SpaceIsCold pink snow]] when he can't fully close his helmet before the SpaceElevator he's in ruptures.
20th Nov '17 8:38:16 PM PaulA
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* AdaptationExpansion: ''Shakedown'', by Terrance Dicks, is an expanded adaptation of the fan video of the same name, also written by Terrance Dicks. The video isn't long enough for a novel (and doesn't have the Doctor or his companions in it, only a few of the aliens from the series), so the novel is in three sections: an adventure with the Doctor and his companions that sets up the events of the video; the novelisation of the video; another adventure with the Doctor, his companions, and the characters from the video that ties everything up. One consequence of this structure is that the first section changes the context of some of the events, and something that seemed like a happy ending in the video isn't in the novel (but it gets sorted out in the third section, so that's okay).


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* {{Arcadia}}: ''Deceit'' mentions a human colony named Arcadia which was designed to embody the trope.


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* AscendedFanboy: Joel in the ''Return of the Living Dad'' and ''The Room With No Doors'', both by Kate Orman, is a sci fi geek and fan of ''Professor X'' (the ShowWithinAShow with suspicious similarities to ''Doctor Who'') who travelled back in time and found himself helping at a halfway house for stranded aliens and the like.
* AuthorPowers: ''Conundrum'' features a return to the Land of Fiction, where the Master of the Land has Author Powers over everything that occurs.
* BackForTheDead: ''Eternity Weeps'', which can't make up its mind whether it's a homage to the Third Doctor era or a ruthless deconstruction, brings Liz Shaw back just so it can kill her off horribly.


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* BBCQuarry: Lampshaded in ''Return of the Living Dad'', where the Doctor comments that Earth is special because he has been to countless other planets, and most of them look like gravel pits.


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* BeigeProse: ''The Pit'' is written entirely in this. A good example comes early on, when a police officer goes from looking over the horribly mutilated corpse of a teenage boy to wondering what his wife's going to cook for dinner, with no change at all in the writing style. What might have come across as a nice bit of black humour in the hands of another writer instead just seems like a bizarre tonal shift.


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* BlackBeltInOrigami: In ''Transit'', the Doctor gets past some Japanese mooks by using the court dialect of the Japanese royal family. They recognised it, but didn't understand it, which was just as well, since he said "Make way, for I am the official keeper of the Emperor's penguins and his majesty's laundry basket is on fire."


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* BreakoutCharacter: Bernice Summerfield proved so popular that when the publishers lost the rights to the Doctor, they [[Franchise/BerniceSummerfield made her the main character of the series]] instead.
* CaptainSpaceDefenderOfEarth: ''The Highest Science'' has the Doctor discover a triangular video cassette showing "Captain Millennium" battling "Libida, Queen of the Virenies", which he considers to be SoBadItsGood. (And when it ends on a cliffhanger with the Captain's assistant being threatened by an evil robot, he concludes it's "almost like real life, in a glamorized sort of way".)


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* ColonCancer: The initial strategy of giving each story arc its own explicit title had results like ''Doctor Who: The New Adventures: Timewyrm: Genesys'' and ''Doctor Who: The New Adventures: Cat's Cradle: Time's Crucible''.


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* CrowdSong: A sequence in ''Sky Pirates!'' features a stress-induced disorder called Rojahama's Song-And-Dance. It only exists in the System, where reality itself runs on RuleOfFunny. (And, since the book twists Rule of Funny into Fridge Horror and back, Benny is deeply traumatised at finding herself singing a song about trusting one another against her will.)
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