History Literature / DoctorWhoNewAdventures

23rd Jan '16 2:37:43 PM StevieG
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* ForegoneConclusion: ''So Vile A Sin'' features [[spoiler:the death of Roz Forrester.]] Because the novel's release was delayed because the author's hard drive crashed halfway through writing it, readers already knows this from "later" novels. As there was no point trying to make this a twist, the finished book begins with [[spoiler:her funeral.]]
18th Jan '16 4:33:50 PM BobSaget9
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'''WARNING! THERE MAY BE UNMARKED SPOILERS!'''
4th Nov '15 8:52:39 PM PaulA
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* CassandraTruth: Played for drama in ''Just War'', when an undercover Benny is captured and interrogated by the Nazis until she cracks and confesses everything -- and the interrogation continues because the interrogator doesn't believe her. In a twist, it's not simply that he doesn't accept her claim to be from the future, but that he doesn't accept the future she claims to be from: he's genuinely convinced the Nazis will win and create a future that will not contain people like Benny.


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* TimelineAlteringMacGuffin: Played with at the end of ''Just War''. A Nazi official gets hold of a book Benny was using to blend into the time period, which details the entire progress of the war, but history is unaffected because he's unable to get his warnings heard by the paranoid and disorganized Nazi high command, and is left to watch impotently as the Third Reich falls apart on cue.
3rd Nov '15 8:25:26 AM StevieG
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* FamousAncestor: The Forrester family take great pride in being able to trace their ancestry back to Nelson Mandela.

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* FamousAncestor: The Forrester family take great pride in being able to trace their ancestry back to Nelson Mandela. [[spoiler:One of the short stories establishes that this is a myth, their ancestors merely lived in Nelson Mandela House]]
24th Oct '15 10:48:30 PM Abodos
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The ability to tell a story in 300 pages with an effectively unlimited "special effects "budget allowed the writers to provide deeper, more thought out stories along with more than a few {{story arc}}s, both universal and character-based. The novels were deliberately aimed at adult readers, rather than the family-friendly aim of the TV series, and did not shy away from depicting sex and violence. The stories expanded upon the Seventh Doctor's penchant for [[ManipulativeBastard playing people-chess]] with both enemies ''and'' friends, and gave it [[{{Deconstruction}} realistic consequences]].

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The ability to tell a story in 300 pages with an effectively unlimited "special effects "budget budget" allowed the writers to provide deeper, more thought out stories along with more than a few {{story arc}}s, both universal and character-based. The novels were deliberately aimed at adult readers, rather than the family-friendly aim of the TV series, and did not shy away from depicting sex and violence. The stories expanded upon the Seventh Doctor's penchant for [[ManipulativeBastard playing people-chess]] with both enemies ''and'' friends, and gave it [[{{Deconstruction}} realistic consequences]].
24th Oct '15 10:48:17 PM Abodos
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The ability to tell a story in 300 pages with an effectively unlimited special effects budget allowed the writers to provide deeper, more thought out stories along with more than a few {{story arc}}s, both universal and character-based. The novels were deliberately aimed at adult readers, rather than the family-friendly aim of the TV series, and did not shy away from depicting sex and violence. The stories expanded upon the Seventh Doctor's penchant for [[ManipulativeBastard playing people-chess]] with both enemies ''and'' friends, and gave it [[{{Deconstruction}} realistic consequences]].

to:

The ability to tell a story in 300 pages with an effectively unlimited special "special effects budget "budget allowed the writers to provide deeper, more thought out stories along with more than a few {{story arc}}s, both universal and character-based. The novels were deliberately aimed at adult readers, rather than the family-friendly aim of the TV series, and did not shy away from depicting sex and violence. The stories expanded upon the Seventh Doctor's penchant for [[ManipulativeBastard playing people-chess]] with both enemies ''and'' friends, and gave it [[{{Deconstruction}} realistic consequences]].
19th Oct '15 8:21:38 PM PaulA
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* BrainUploading: In ''Cat's Cradle: Warhead'', a villainous MegaCorp is experimenting with brain uploading on behalf of a consortium of rich clients seeking to cheat death.


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* SmartGun: A subplot in ''Cat's Cradle: Warhead'' involves a police officer field-testing an experimental smart gun, which has a status display screen and proves to be able to target and fire itself. It is eventually revealed to have a complete personality created by BrainUploading another police officer, and various quirks it displayed through the novel were attempts by this personality to communicate beyond the limited repertoire of gun-related information the gun's systems were designed to permit.
25th Jul '15 4:00:50 AM PaulA
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* MetaphorIsMyMiddleName: In her first appearance, Benny tells the Doctor, "Surprise is my middle name. Bernice Surprise Summerfield. My poor Mum wanted to hammer the point home." It is subsequently established that this is literally true.
8th Jun '15 1:20:29 AM PaulA
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* ContractualImmortality:
** The NA creators had (perhaps only semi-seriously?) discussed regenerating the Seventh Doctor into a Doctor "played" by David Troughton, the son of Creator/PatrickTroughton. Creator/TheBBC did not allow them to do it.
** Also played with in the final Doctor Who New Adventure, ''The Dying Days'', at the time of which a rumor went around to the effect that Virgin were going to spite the BBC by killing the Doctor off. It features quite a bit of foreshadowing to that effect, starting, obviously, with the title. [[spoiler:The Doctor is apparently killed halfway through, but it's a NeverFoundTheBody situation and he shows up alive and well in the climax, just in time to save the day.]]



* DawsonCasting: Played with as at least one writer in the early novels described Ace (around 18 when the TV series concluded and played by Creator/SophieAldred, an actress in her late twenties) as in her twenties. This might indicate that a couple of years have passed since the first NA (though apparently haven't) or could explain why Aldred did not exactly look like a teenager.



* MilestoneCelebration: The 50th New Adventure, ''Happy Endings'', marked the occasion with Benny's wedding, with characters from most of the previous books turning up, plus a chapter featuring contributions from almost every author in the range up to that point, apart from Jim Mortimore.



** Infamously, ''Lungbarrow'' revealed that, since a long-ago catastrophe rendered their entire race sterile, Time Lords don't have sex -- they get created on ''looms''. (Included at no extra cost: A tortured explanation of how, in that case, the Doctor can be Susan's grandfather.) The novel led to a lot of MemeticMutation, and was entirely ignored by the TV series.

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** Infamously, ''Lungbarrow'' revealed that, since a long-ago catastrophe rendered their entire race sterile, Time Lords don't have sex -- they get created on ''looms''. (Included at no extra cost: A tortured explanation of how, in that case, the Doctor can be Susan's grandfather.) The novel led to a lot of MemeticMutation, and This revelation was entirely ignored by the TV series.
8th Jun '15 1:12:11 AM PaulA
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** In ''Love and War'', Ace acompanies New Age Traveller Jan on a cyberspace-enhanced Vision Quest, in which they meet the {{Trickster}}. Ace starts to identify who she sees him as, but gets interupted. However his cry of "[[CatchPhrase You wouldn't let it lie!]]" and later comment "That's a Diana and Trickster sword" makes it pretty clear he's [[TheSmellOfReevesAndMortimer Vic Reeves]].

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** In ''Love and War'', Ace acompanies New Age Traveller Jan on a cyberspace-enhanced Vision Quest, in which they meet the {{Trickster}}. Ace starts to identify who she sees him as, but gets interupted. However his cry of "[[CatchPhrase You wouldn't let it lie!]]" and later comment "That's a Diana and Trickster sword" makes it pretty clear he's [[TheSmellOfReevesAndMortimer [[Series/TheSmellOfReevesAndMortimer Vic Reeves]].
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