History Literature / DarknessAtNoon

29th Sep '16 12:30:31 PM Morgenthaler
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''Darkness at Noon'' is a 1940 novel by Arthur Koestler. The story is set in the Soviet Union during JosephStalin's Great Purge in the 1930s. None of this is identified explicitly; the country is only referred as "the Country of the Revolution", the Communist Party as "The Party" and Stalin as "Number One". Koestler, who used to be a Communist, expressed his disillusionment with the movement through the novel. ''Darkness at Noon'' is considered to be one of the most influential anti-Soviet books ever written.

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''Darkness at Noon'' is a 1940 novel by Arthur Koestler. The story is set in the Soviet Union during JosephStalin's UsefulNotes/JosephStalin's Great Purge in the 1930s. None of this is identified explicitly; the country is only referred as "the Country of the Revolution", the Communist Party as "The Party" and Stalin as "Number One". Koestler, who used to be a Communist, expressed his disillusionment with the movement through the novel. ''Darkness at Noon'' is considered to be one of the most influential anti-Soviet books ever written.
23rd Aug '16 9:57:42 PM Fireblood
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* DoomedMoralVictor: Averted strongly. [[spoiler:Rubashov is not and has never been a hero; he has actually done things just as bad or worse than what is being done to him to others when the party demanded it. He has no code of morality to which he can truly appeal beyond the will of the party, and the party now demands that he die for crimes he didn't commit, so this is what he does. This sets him apart from the officer in the neighboring cell, who belongs to a pre-revolutionary code.]]

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* DoomedMoralVictor: Averted {{Averted}} strongly. [[spoiler:Rubashov is not and has never been a hero; he has actually done things just as bad or worse than what is being done to him to others when the party demanded it. He has no code of morality to which he can truly appeal beyond the will of the party, and the party now demands that he die for crimes he didn't commit, so this is what he does. This sets him apart from the officer in the neighboring cell, who belongs to a pre-revolutionary code.]]



* FromACertainPointOfView: From a certain point of view, the charges brought up against Rubashov were true; for instance he did talk about plans of removing Number One by violence, or handing over a strategic territory to an enemy country. But nothing would have ever came of it, because the old generation was too tired, too worn out to actually do anything: "the whole activity of the so-called opposition had been senile chatter". But Rubashov can't explain this to Gletkin. However, when he's accused with something that isn't true from any point of view - committing sabotage in the aluminum trust he led - he manages to convince Gletkin to drop the charge.

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* FromACertainPointOfView: From a certain point of view, the charges brought up against Rubashov were true; for instance he did talk about plans of removing Number One by violence, or handing over a strategic territory to an enemy country. But nothing would have ever came of it, because the old generation was too tired, too worn out to actually do anything: "the whole activity of the so-called opposition had been senile chatter". But Rubashov can't explain this to Gletkin. However, when he's accused with of something that isn't true from any point of view - committing sabotage in the aluminum trust he led - he manages to convince Gletkin to drop the charge.



* TortureAlwaysWorks: Gletkin is a firm believer of this, stating "Human beings able to resist any amount of physical pressure do not exist." Ivanov brings up that during the Civil War, Gletkin was captured by the enemy, and they tied a lighted candlewick on to his shaven skull, but he didn't confess. Gletkin counters that this was only because they didn't have enough time to torture him, as he was rescued a few hours later.

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* TortureAlwaysWorks: Gletkin is a firm believer of in this, stating "Human beings able to resist any amount of physical pressure do not exist." Ivanov brings up that during the Civil War, Gletkin was captured by the enemy, and they tied a lighted candlewick on to his shaven skull, but he didn't confess. Gletkin counters that this was only because they didn't have enough time to torture him, as he was rescued a few hours later.
6th Jul '16 12:08:25 AM freesefan
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* AMillionIsAStatistic: Ivanov uses this as an excuse for the ReignOfTerror:
-->"Every year several million people are killed quite pointlessly by epidemics and other natural catastrophes. And we should shrink from sacrificing a few hundred thousand for the most promising experiment in history? Not to mention the legions of those who die of undernourishment and tuberculosis in coal and quicksilver mines, rice-fields and cotton plantations. No one takes any notice of them; nobody asks why or what for; but if here we shoot a few thousand objectively harmful people, the humanitarians all over the world foam at the mouth."


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* AMillionIsAStatistic: Ivanov uses this as an excuse for the ReignOfTerror:
-->"Every year several million people are killed quite pointlessly by epidemics and other natural catastrophes. And we should shrink from sacrificing a few hundred thousand for the most promising experiment in history? Not to mention the legions of those who die of undernourishment and tuberculosis in coal and quicksilver mines, rice-fields and cotton plantations. No one takes any notice of them; nobody asks why or what for; but if here we shoot a few thousand objectively harmful people, the humanitarians all over the world foam at the mouth."
13th Jul '15 6:51:05 AM Aquila89
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* FromACertainPointOfView: From a certain point of view, the charges brought up against Rubashov were true; for instance he did talk about plans of removing Number One by violence, or handing over a strategic territory to an enemy country. But nothing would have ever came of it, because the old generation was too tired, too worn out to actually do anything: "the whole activity of the so-called opposition had been senile chatter". But Rubashov can't explain this to Gletkin. When he's accused with something that isn't true from any point of view - committing sabotage in the aluminum trust he led - he manages to convince Gletkin to drop the charge.

to:

* FromACertainPointOfView: From a certain point of view, the charges brought up against Rubashov were true; for instance he did talk about plans of removing Number One by violence, or handing over a strategic territory to an enemy country. But nothing would have ever came of it, because the old generation was too tired, too worn out to actually do anything: "the whole activity of the so-called opposition had been senile chatter". But Rubashov can't explain this to Gletkin. When However, when he's accused with something that isn't true from any point of view - committing sabotage in the aluminum trust he led - he manages to convince Gletkin to drop the charge.
13th Jul '15 6:50:32 AM Aquila89
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Added DiffLines:

* FromACertainPointOfView: From a certain point of view, the charges brought up against Rubashov were true; for instance he did talk about plans of removing Number One by violence, or handing over a strategic territory to an enemy country. But nothing would have ever came of it, because the old generation was too tired, too worn out to actually do anything: "the whole activity of the so-called opposition had been senile chatter". But Rubashov can't explain this to Gletkin. When he's accused with something that isn't true from any point of view - committing sabotage in the aluminum trust he led - he manages to convince Gletkin to drop the charge.
13th Jul '15 6:35:36 AM Aquila89
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* AsTheGoodBookSays: Wassilij, the porter of the house Rubashov lived in, and a veteran of his regiment in the Civil War keeps a Bible hidden in a hole in his mattress until his daughter finds it and throws it away. He can still quote passages from it by heart. The newspaper account of Rubashov's trial reminds him of the mockery of Jesus by the Roman soldiers.

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* AsTheGoodBookSays: Wassilij, the porter of the house Rubashov lived in, and a veteran of his regiment in the Civil War keeps a Bible hidden in a hole in his mattress until his daughter finds it and throws it away. He can still quote passages from it by heart. The newspaper account of Rubashov's trial reminds him of the mockery of Jesus by the Roman soldiers.soldiers - and himself signing a resolution condemning traitors like Rubashov reminds him of Peter denying Jesus.
19th May '15 6:37:33 PM Hundun
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-->'''No. 402:''' Honor is to live and die for one's belief.

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-->'''No. 402:''' Honor is to live and die for one's belief.beliefs.
19th May '15 6:35:57 PM Hundun
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Added DiffLines:

* DoomedMoralVictor: Averted strongly. [[spoiler:Rubashov is not and has never been a hero; he has actually done things just as bad or worse than what is being done to him to others when the party demanded it. He has no code of morality to which he can truly appeal beyond the will of the party, and the party now demands that he die for crimes he didn't commit, so this is what he does. This sets him apart from the officer in the neighboring cell, who belongs to a pre-revolutionary code.]]
-->'''No. 402:''' Honor is to live and die for one's belief.
-->'''Rubashov:''' Honor is to be useful without vanity.
19th May '15 5:52:58 PM Hundun
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* TotalitarianUtilitarian: The philosophy of the revolution in a nutshell. Ivanov at one point notes that countless people die of starvation or disease every year, so he sees no reason why the party should shed any tears over the need to exterminate a few million 'objectively harmful' people if it helps create a better world for those who survive.

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* TotalitarianUtilitarian: The philosophy of the revolution in a nutshell. Ivanov at one point notes that countless people die pointlessly and meaninglessly of starvation or disease every year, so he sees no reason why the party should shed any tears over the need to exterminate a few million 'objectively harmful' people if it helps create a better world for those who survive.
19th May '15 5:52:25 PM Hundun
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Added DiffLines:

* MotiveDecay: The Revolution as a whole.


Added DiffLines:

* TotalitarianUtilitarian: The philosophy of the revolution in a nutshell. Ivanov at one point notes that countless people die of starvation or disease every year, so he sees no reason why the party should shed any tears over the need to exterminate a few million 'objectively harmful' people if it helps create a better world for those who survive.
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