History Literature / Cinderella

9th Jun '17 1:27:47 AM lalaTKG
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* EvenEvilHasStandards: In Perrault's version the youngest stepsister is less bitchy than her sister and mother because she names her stepsister "Cendrillon" ("Cinderella") instead of Cucendron [[hottip:note:which means, for those of us who don't speak French, ''Ash-ass'' or ''with her ass in the cinders'', though it would be more correct to use ''Cul-cendron'' instead]]. Though keep in mind, "Cendrillon" is actually a pormanteau of the french words for "ash" and "scullion," so it is not really that nicer of a name.

to:

* EvenEvilHasStandards: In Perrault's version the youngest stepsister is less bitchy than her sister and mother because she names her stepsister "Cendrillon" ("Cinderella") instead of Cucendron [[hottip:note:which [[note]]which means, for those of us who don't speak French, ''Ash-ass'' or ''with her ass in the cinders'', though it would be more correct to use ''Cul-cendron'' instead]].instead[[/note]]. Though keep in mind, "Cendrillon" is actually a pormanteau of the french words for "ash" and "scullion," so it is not really that nicer of a name.
19th May '17 2:47:05 PM JoeMerl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* EasilyForgiven: In Perrault's version, the stepsisters beg Cinderella to forgive them, and she does; they even get to marry handsome gentlemen from the prince's court. They also apologize in the Grimms' version, but only to curry their royal relative's favor. She still buys it, but [[EyeScream their ending is...less happy]].



* EyeScream: In Grimm's tale, the stepsisters end blinded by birds.

to:

* EyeScream: In Grimm's tale, the stepsisters end up blinded by birds.



** In some versions, her father is just e.g. a well-off merchant.

to:

** In some versions, her father is just e.g. a well-off merchant.
19th May '17 2:26:06 PM JoeMerl
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* TheCakeIsALie: In some versions, the Wicked Stepmother says that she'll let Cinderella go to the ball if she completes some {{Impossible Task}}s--for example, in the Grimms' version, cleaning up increasingly large messes of spilled lentils in a limited time. She succeeds because of the doves who act as her {{Spirit Advisor}}s, but naturally, the family leaves her behind anyway. Disney did a variant of this, with all the extra chores they tried so that she couldn't make a dress.
19th May '17 2:18:38 PM JoeMerl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DeathByAdaptation: Nearly every adaptation ever has Cinderella's dad die sometime after marrying the Wicked Stepmother. In both Perrault and the Brothers Grimm, he's alive--[[ParentalNeglect he just doesn't seem to care that his daughter is being abused]]. The Grimms' version even has him introduce her to the prince as their kitchen-maid, ''not'' his daughter.

to:

* DeathByAdaptation: Nearly every adaptation ever has Cinderella's dad die sometime after marrying the Wicked Stepmother. In both Perrault and the Brothers Grimm, he's alive--[[ParentalNeglect he just doesn't seem to care that his daughter is being abused]]. The Grimms' version even has him introduce her to the prince as their kitchen-maid, ''not'' his daughter.



* ParentalNeglect: While he usually suffers DeathByAdaptation, the older versions have Cinderella's father alive throughout the story--he just doesn't seem to care that she's being abused. The Grimms' version even has him introduce her to the prince as their kitchen-maid, ''not'' his daughter.



** Representing her dead mother, this might be a fairy godmother, a tree, or an animal (Yeh-Shen had a magic carp). Some are more closely to connect to the mother than others; the tree, for instance, is often planted on her mother's grave.

to:

** Representing her dead mother, this might be a fairy godmother, a tree, or an animal (Yeh-Shen had a magic carp).animal. Some are more closely to connect to the mother than others; the tree, for instance, is often planted on her mother's grave. Yeh-Shen actually had a magical fish that was the {{Reincarnation}} of her mother.
19th May '17 2:12:38 PM JoeMerl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DisappearedDad: Cinderella's father is nearly always dead or absent. If he lives, he never intervenes on his daughter's behalf.

to:

* DisappearedDad: DeathByAdaptation: Nearly every adaptation ever has Cinderella's father is nearly always dead or absent. If dad die sometime after marrying the Wicked Stepmother. In both Perrault and the Brothers Grimm, he's alive--[[ParentalNeglect he lives, he never intervenes on just doesn't seem to care that his daughter's behalf.daughter is being abused]]. The Grimms' version even has him introduce her to the prince as their kitchen-maid, ''not'' his daughter.
17th Apr '17 9:00:08 PM ChaoticNovelist
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AdaptationExpansion: In the above mentioned version, Cinderella meets the prince twice before the ball. The first is when she comes across him and his friends hunting in the woods and amuses herself by annoying them and making them chase after her. The second is when she disguises herself as a hunter and impresses them with her aiming skills.

to:

* AdaptationExpansion: AdaptationExpansion: In the above mentioned 1973 Czech version, Cinderella meets the prince twice before the ball. The first is when she comes across him and his friends hunting in the woods and amuses herself by annoying them and making them chase after her. The second is when she disguises herself as a hunter and impresses them with her aiming skills.



* BeautifulAllAlong: Once she shows up in her PimpedOutDress.

to:

* BeautifulAllAlong: Once she shows up in her PimpedOutDress.PimpedOutDress, the "cinder girl" is revealed to be quite a stunner.



* InterClassRomance: Being a noble woman the distinction is less extreme than other examples, but Cinderella's ''de facto'' status is servant.
** And in some versions, her father is just e.g. a well-off merchant.

to:

* InterClassRomance: InterClassRomance:
**
Being a noble woman the distinction is less extreme than other examples, but Cinderella's ''de facto'' status is servant.
** And in In some versions, her father is just e.g. a well-off merchant.



* NoNameGiven: One of the stepsisters is named Javotte but the other characters don't have names. Cinderella's real name is rarely given, though English variants usually imply Ella is her real name. Madame D'aulnoy used "Finetta" in her early version.

to:

* NoNameGiven: NoNameGiven:
**
One of the stepsisters is named Javotte but the other characters don't have names. Cinderella's real name is rarely given, though English variants usually imply Ella is her real name. Madame D'aulnoy used "Finetta" in her early version.
14th Feb '17 6:08:48 AM Lancelot07
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AdaptationalBadass: In the 1973 Czech version, "Three Nuts for Cinderella", Cinderella rides horses and is a sharpshooter. During her second meeting with the prince (while she's disguised as a hunter) she impresses him and his hunter friends with shooting a flying hawk with a crossbrow, then a pinecone of a tree far away.

to:

* AdaptationalBadass: In the 1973 Czech version, "Three Nuts for Cinderella", Cinderella rides horses and is a sharpshooter. During her second meeting with the prince (while she's disguised as a hunter) she impresses him and his hunter friends with shooting a flying hawk with a crossbrow, then a pinecone of off a tree far away.



* AdaptedOut: In the 1973 Czech version, Cinderella has one stepsister instead of two. And there is no Fairy Godmother. Instead, Cinderella is given three magic hazelnuts who each reveal a different outfit for her depending on when she needs them in the story. First is a hunter's outfit, then a ball gown, and lastly a wedding dress.

to:

* AdaptedOut: In the 1973 Czech version, Cinderella has one stepsister instead of two. And there is no Fairy Godmother. Instead, Cinderella is given three magic hazelnuts who that each reveal a different outfit for her depending on when she needs them in the story. First is a hunter's outfit, then a ball gown, and lastly a wedding dress.
20th Jan '17 10:54:23 AM ChaoticNovelist
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* WhenTheClockStrikesTwelve: UrExample and trope codifier. The oldest use of this trope and the one people think of.

to:

* WhenTheClockStrikesTwelve: UrExample and trope codifier. The oldest use of this trope and the one people think of. "At the stroke of midnight, the spell will be broken).
15th Jan '17 3:19:25 AM Lancelot07
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationalBadass: In the 1973 Czech version, "Three Nuts for Cinderella", Cinderella rides horses and is a sharpshooter. During her second meeting with the prince (while she's disguised as a hunter) she impresses him and his hunter friends with shooting a flying hawk with a crossbrow, then a pinecone of a tree far away.
* AdaptationExpansion: In the above mentioned version, Cinderella meets the prince twice before the ball. The first is when she comes across him and his friends hunting in the woods and amuses herself by annoying them and making them chase after her. The second is when she disguises herself as a hunter and impresses them with her aiming skills.


Added DiffLines:

* AdaptedOut: In the 1973 Czech version, Cinderella has one stepsister instead of two. And there is no Fairy Godmother. Instead, Cinderella is given three magic hazelnuts who each reveal a different outfit for her depending on when she needs them in the story. First is a hunter's outfit, then a ball gown, and lastly a wedding dress.
27th Sep '16 7:45:17 AM fruitstripegum
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The quintessential RagsToRoyalty story, the best known versions in the western world are based on the one written by Creator/CharlesPerrault in the 17th century. If, on hearing the name Cinderella, you think of fairy godmothers, glass slippers, and a pumpkin turned into a coach, you're thinking of Perrault. In 1950, [[Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon Disney]]'s ''Disney/{{Cinderella}}'' adapted Perrault's story into a movie, cementing it in people's minds as '''the''' story of Cinderella. [[note]]Unless, of course, you're Czech, Slovak, German or Norwegian, in which case you're probably thinking of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%C5%99i_o%C5%99%C3%AD%C5%A1ky_pro_Popelku this one]], notably lacking in pumpkins, glass footwear, and godmothers of any extraction.[[/note]]

to:

The quintessential RagsToRoyalty story, the best known versions in the western world are based on the one written by Creator/CharlesPerrault in the 17th century. If, on hearing the name Cinderella, you think of fairy godmothers, glass slippers, and a pumpkin turned into a coach, you're thinking of Perrault. In 1950, [[Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon Disney]]'s ''Disney/{{Cinderella}}'' adapted Perrault's story into a movie, cementing it in people's minds as '''the''' story of Cinderella. [[note]]Unless, of course, you're Czech, Slovak, German or Norwegian, in which case you're probably thinking of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%C5%99i_o%C5%99%C3%AD%C5%A1ky_pro_Popelku [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070832/ this one]], notably lacking in pumpkins, glass footwear, and godmothers of any extraction.[[/note]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 101. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.Cinderella